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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-FIVE. 

SEPTEMBER 20. 1911 SEPTEMBER 11. 1912. 



Title No. Pajre 

A 

Accidents in British F"actorics 29 4 

Accidents, Railroad, in United States... 36 12 

Advance in Doctors' Fees 40 9 

Against Lascar Crews 30 6 

Airship, First in China 23 5 

Alaska Correspondence (By Louis Berg) 51 10 

Alaska, Commerce With 16 12 

".Albatross Bol)" (By Thomas True).... 31 11 
•'All's Well That Ends Well" (By "Fl 

Tiierto") 9 10 

.\nil)ergris Found 22 5 

Ambergris, A i'orlune in 36 9 

American Federation of Labor — 

Convention Call 1 2 

Gompers at San Francisco 2 1 

Gompers' Report 10 1 

Growth of Membership 11 3 

Figlit on Civic Federation Lost 12 3 

Convention Proceedings 13 1 

McXamara Defense Fund 13 15 

"Gompers Desecrates the I''lag!" 22 1 

Contempt Case Still On 26 3 

President Gompers' Mascot 27 10 

American Sea Spirit, to Revive (By An- 
drew Furuseth ) 6 1 

America, Central, Wireless in 45 2 

.\merican Shi]iping, Facts of 9 6 

.\nierican Steam Vessels in I^'oreign 

Trade, Tonnage of 24 15 

.\mcrican Miners Turn 29 7 

.\merican Ships, Seamen on 32 7 

American Factories, Output of 32 13 

.Americanization of Germany 33 10 

.Amundsen Discovers South Pole 26 14 

-Ancients, Ships of the 36 10 

.\nother "Party" Wanted! 50 7 

.\ntwerp Port Improvement 39 9 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Compulsory .Arljitration .Again 9 6 

New Zealand Seamen Reject .Arbitra- 
tion 31 4 

Country Without Strikes 51 6 

.\rI)itration, Peace and 7 9 

-\rgentina, Furope and 46 9 

-Argentine Shipping Projects 33 10 

.\rgentinc Strike Bill 44 ^ 

-Arizona .Admitted to Statehood 23 12 

.Arizona, h'irst Legislature Meets 29 12 

-\rizona Seaport, -An 31 10 

-Around Bristol Channel (By Walter Mac- 

artlnir) 51 7 

San Francisco, -As Seen in Californi;i . . . 8 6 

.Atlantic, Icebergs in the 21 11 

Atlantic, Navigation in North 30 9 

-Austin (Pa.) Dam Breaks 5 14 

-\ustralia. Old Age Pensions in.. 17-4; 18-14; 33-4 

.Australia's New Capital 6 2 

.\ustralian Waters, Wrecks in 11 5 

.\u.\iliary Sailing Ship 29 11 

-Aviation. XA'orld's Speed Record 25 14 

-Aviation, Speed Record 45 14 

B 

Ban on Log Raft 1 7 

Bavaria, Strikes in 3 15 

Beer, Consumption of 11 12 

Beer, Consumption of United States.... 44 12 

Belgian .Seamen, Strike of 48 7 

Bells Beneath the Sea 11 7 

Benefits, Cigarmakers' 47 10 

Benson, Captain Carl Albert (Ameri- 
cana ) Murdered 31 5 

Benson Captain (.Americana), Murderer 

Sentenced 35 5 

Bergen, Port of 16 11 

Bergen-Christiania Railway 31 2 

Berlin, Growth of 8 10 

Births, Deaths, Etc., in France 38 14 

"Brassbound" 40 8 

Bravery, Seamen Rewarded for 2-12; 8-14 

Bravest Seamen of the Year 29 5 

Bread, Buy Union Label 4 2 



Title No. Pr'.ge 

Britain, Industrial Peace in 33 9 

I5ritisli Seamen's Demands 29 6 

liritish Trade-Union Congress 6 2 

British Seamen Drowned in 1910 9 4 

I'.ritish Shijjping, Tonnage of 22 15 

British Ships and Subsidies 23 8 

British -Miners' Strike 25 6 

British Trade-Unions, Number and Fi- 
nances of 26 4 

British Empire, No 27 2 

British Naval Estimates 28 14 

P>ritish Mines, Regulations for 36 8 

British Seamen's Outlook, The 39 8 

British Undermanning 39 9 

British Insurance -Act 46 3 

British National Insurance (Bj- Walter 

-Macarthur) 50 I 

British Navy, Unionizing 50 10 

Boats and Seamen, for 33 7 

P>olu-mia, New Wage Scale in 38 9 

B(ii)t (in Wrong Foot (Gompers' Con- 

tem pt Case ) 42 6 

Booth. General, Death of 50 14 

Born .After Mother's Death .38 12 

P.oycott and Picket Legal 42 3 

Building Big Ships 4 2 

F.urden of Militarism 48 11 

Business Still on Top..* 13 6 

C 

California, (iold Protluction of 3 14 

California In the Lead (Constitutional 

-Amendments) 5 7 

California, Value of Property in 8 12 

California, Population of 9 12 

California, School Attendance in 10 12 

California, Gold Produced in 19 12 

California, Tuberculosis in . . . „ 21 12 

California, Indians in 24 12 

California Warns Labor 27 2 

California, Illiteracy in 36 12 

California, White Foreign- Born Popula- 
tion of ! ,38 12 

California Is "Some Pumpkins" 45 10 

Camorrists Convicted 44 14 

Canada, Population of 2-14; 6-14 

Canada, Immigration to 16 13 

Canada. Growth of 32 10 

(Tanada, Not Needed in 43 9 

Canadian Immigration Returns 28 10 

Canal Opens, When the 11 11 

Canal (Panama) Is Finished, When the 36 2 
Carnegie Gift to San Francisco, Labor 

Opi)oses 36 13 

Carnegie Gift Accepted 41 6 

Charity and Trickery 50 2 

Child Labor Bureau Created 32 13 

Child-Labor in England 41 9 

Child-Labor in Greece 42 11 

China, Population of 3 13 

China, Demand for Constitution Granted 9 13 

China, First .\irship in 23 5 

Chinese Language Test 11 7 

Chinese and Lascar Crews 27 6 

Chinese Wages and Living 29 2 

Christmas Tidings 14 6 

Chronicle Nearly Hits It 34 6 

Cigarmakers' Benefits 47 10 

Circumstances Alter Cases... 36 7 

Circumstantial Evidence (By "El Tu- 

erto") 38 2 

Classes, Safety by 49 7 

Coal, the Cry for 28 6 

Coal Cargo, A Record 28 9 

Coal, Production of in England 29 4 

Coal Strikes and Trustees 29 7 

Coal Strike, Effects of the 47 8 

Coaling Record 13 14 

Coast Stamen's Journal — 

.About Ouisc'ves 1 6 

Coastwise (Pa(,ific) Passengers Carried ,30 5 

Commerce With .Alaska 16 12 

Commerce of New York 46 13 

Commodity, Labor Not a 44 8 

Company Stores in France 45 11 



Title X 

Compasses Without Magnets 

Concerning Number Nine 

Constitutional .Amendments California.. 

Constitution, The U. S 

Constitutional Amendments (Cal.) 

Consumption, Seamen and 

Cooks' Organizer Reports 

Coos Bay (Or.), Commentary on 

Copper, World's Production of 

Cost of Militarism 

Cost of War 

Courage of the Striker 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Citizenship of Seamen 

Citizenship (Seamen) Case Decided.. 

I )isappearance of Seamen 

Distressed British Seamen 

Fisherman Gets Damages 

1 n jured by -Occident 

Seamen Awarded Wages 

Smith. Chas. T., Second-Mate Maka 
wcli, Con\'icte(l 

Smith (Makaweli) Sentenced 

Critic Corrected, .A 

Cuba to Have a Navy 

Cunard Line, Report of 

Cunard Line Dividend 



o. Pa 
30 
13 
2 

47 
44 
52 
37 
38 
52 
21 
51 
29 



13 
28 
23 
12 
6 
28 
24 



8 
20 
47 
28 
2» 



D 

Darrow. Clarence, Trial of Begun 37 

Day We Celebrate, The 50 

Deadly Iceberg, The 33 

Death of Japanese Emperor 47 

Debris, Islands of 49 

Deckloads, Timber 48 

Defending Seamen's Rights 16 

Defending Monopoly 33 

Demonstration of Efficiency 45 

Depopulation, French 33 

Dejith of the Seas 47 

Dickens, Charles, Centenary of 22 

Direct Legislation 46 

Dirigible Balloon, .Altitude Record 41 

Disappearance of the Seaman 36 

Disease of Idleness, the 39 

Dividends on Suez Canal 39 

Doctors' Fees, -Advance in 40 

Dog. Eulogy on the 35 

Dominion, Dry-Docks in the 51 

Dry-Dock, For a Public 28 

Dry-Dock, Largest in World 31 

Dry-Docks in the Dominion 51 



"lulucated" Strikebreakers 

I'-fficiency, Demonstration of 

I-'gg, the Largest 

Fight-Hour Bill, Government 

Bill 

Bill .Signed 

Law. New 

Del Puerto" (By "Fl 



Fight-Hour 
Fight-Hour 
Fight-Hour 
"El Capitan 

erto") 

■•Elections, (U. S.), Socialist Gains in 

ICmi)ire, No British _ 

Employers' Liability 

l';mi)loyes of United States 

h'ngineers (Titanic), Tribute to the. 

I'.ngl.ind, Paui)ers in 

ICngland. Profit Sharing in 

England, Child-Labor in 

English Channel, Swimming the.... 

luilogy on the Dog 

F-uropeans in India 

luiropc and Argentina 

I'.vans, Rear-Admiral, Death of 



Tu- 



45 
45 
29 
16 
40 
42 
44 

3 

10 
27 
45 

3 
42 
16 
28 
41 

1 
35 
40 
46 
17 



Falkland Islands, Wireless Station 3 

I'.-ither of the Man 1 

Features of Trade-Unions 47 

Federation (Cal.) and Seamen 5 

I'ire I.osso in London 24 



6 
11 
8 
11 
7 
9 
5 

5 
5 
7 
9 
8 
15 



13 
6 
2 

14 
9 

11 
6 

11 
7 
8 
8 

14 
1 

14 
6 

11 

14 
9 
8 
8 
7 

15 
8 



6 

7 

12 

3 

3 

3 

11 



12 
2 

10 

15 
9 
4 
4 
9 

13 
8 

14 
9 

15 



5 
2 
11 
7 
7 



COAST SEAMi:\S |()l"R.\Al, I XDEX— \"( )IA'MR T\VE^"|•^'-1•■|\ !•:. 



(Sliipping) Dodge, Latest... 44 1 

llenclo 41) 9 

■ Through 45 11 

rs at Sea 4S 8 



...|)i;in Soil l'"ir-herie> 

Oundie Whalers I'rosperous 

I-isherman Gets Damages 

WhaliiiK Industry Revival 

Pacilic Coast Fisheries 

Piiget Soiitul Salmon Pack, 1911... 

Pacific Salmon Pack 

Swedish Fishing Industries 

Xova Scotia's F'isheries 

Whaling in South .\frica 

Whaling Industry. The 

Russian I'isheries 

Xorwegian Whalers .Active 

Zuidcr Zee l-'ishery 

.\lask;i Salmon Feeding Grounds.. 

Hritisli Columl)ia Herring 

Herring Trade in Canada 

Whaling in Southern Seas 

i'ishing Indu.stry in Xorvvay 

Mfitor I-"ishing Boats 

Scotch I'ishing Industry 

Bristol Bay Salmon Pack 

l^undee Whaling Industry 

l-'leet. The Vanishing 

l'"og Signals. Hertzian Waves as.... 

I'"oo(l Prices Soar, Why 

F'ortune in .\mhergris, .\ 

l-"ourth of July Accidents 

Fraternal Delegate Departs 

l'"rench Depopulation 

h'rencli Shipping Statistics 

F'rench Seamen's Strike 

France, Population of 

I'rance, Time in Changed 

hrance, Births, Deaths, Etc., in 

hrance. Company Stores in 

l-"rye (William P.) "Mutiny'" on the. 
l-"unneK, Ships Without 



30 



6 
6 
13 
13 
16 
19 
28 
9: 30- 
30 
30 
36 
41 
42 
44 
45 
46 
48 
48 
48 
48 
49 



Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by — 

I'ndernianning. ICtTects ot 

Tow-Barges and Log-Rafts. . . . 
To Revive .\merican Sea Spirit. 



45 
4 
51 
36 
44 
45 
3^ 
40 
46 
19 
31 
38 
45 
30 
7 



(ia--(iiiiie for Sailing Vessels 30 

Generation, Wrecks of a 34 

German Unions of 1910 20 

(lerman Shiphuilding Industry 45 

German Yards, Output of 46 

German Companies Prosperous 47 

(German Merchant Marine 52 

(iermany. .Americanization of 3.3 

(jennany. Strikes in 45 

(;iasgo\v, Port of 47 

(ioing I'-arming (By ""Kl Tuerto") 49 

Gol.l Mines (Transvaal) Output of 1 

(lold I'roduction of California 3 



(jold Produced in California. 



19 



10 

9 

9 

12 

6 

8 

8 

() 

4 

14 

14 

11 

6 

11 



8 

11 

11 

2 

ll 

il 

9 

'0 

2 

9 

2 

13 
14 
12 



Gompcrs at San I'Vancisco 2 1 

Government F-ight-Hour Bill 16 3 

Graft Cases San I'Tancisco, Dismissed.. 37 12 

"Grand Old Man, .\," James H. Barry.. 6 7 

Great Lakes. Tonnage on 22 15 

Greatest Skvscraper. The 7 10 

Greece. Clnid-I.ahor in 42 11 

Growth of Berlin 8 10 

Growth of Can.ida <2 10 

Gulf Stream Help and Menace 43 11 

Gyro-Compass, The ^2 10 

H 

ll.inilnirg. Traffic of 23 15 

llanihnrg's Great ll.irbor 29 10 

Harl.or Work in Italy 49 8 

Hawaiian Plantation W'ages 49 8 

Hertzian Waves as Fog Signals 4 10 

History Repeats Itself 47 6 

Hookworm. Quarantining 49 9 

Holland. Hours uf Labor in 28 10 

Home Rule Bill 31-14: 32-14: 35-14 

Hongkong Shipping Record 43 10 

Hours of Labor 32 8 

I-J-K 

Injunction, Government By, Etc. — 

I'uru^eth on the Injunction 29 

Injunction l.imit.ition Bill 33 

Report on Injunction Rill 36 

Injunction Bill Passes 37 

Sentences Reimposcd (Buck Contempt 

Case ) 43 

Anti-Injunction Plank 43 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Seamen's Bill Indorsed .' 7 

Prospects of Seamen's Bill 7 

Seamen's Convention Call 7 

.Analysis of Greene Bill 9 

Greene Hill, .Analyses of by .A. Furu- 
seth. G. C. Bodine and Wm. Den- 
man r 9-1: 10-2: 

Seamen's Convention, The 11 

Seamen's Convention 14-1: 14-6; 15-1; 

Con\ention Group (Photo) 17 

Convention's Work, The 17 

Seamen's Bill, Press on the l'< 

Seamen Make Good 18 

"Imprisonment" in -Seamen's Bill 19 

Question of improvement 19 

Good Recommendation. -A 19 

"Efficiency and Language" 20 

Washington Labor .Aids Seamen 20 

Seamen Speak for Their Bill... 17-1; 18-2; 

Strange Bedfellows 21 

Seamen's Legislative History 23 



Xi 



16-2 
1 

(> 
1 
6 
1 
6 
6 
1 
6 

19-2 
6 
1 



Title 

History of the international 

Talk for Talk's Sake 

Seamen's Bill Indorsed (J. .A. John- 
son ) 

Features of Seamen's Hill 

Simpson on Seamen's Bill 

Seamen's Hill .Aids Shipping 

Senator Xelson's Red Herring 

""Efliciency" Clause, The 

Seamen's Bill on Its W^y 

Safety Depends Upon Seamen (Mem- 
orial to Congress) 

Replies From Washington 

Seamen's Bill Reported 

Seamen's Bill in (iood Shape 

Shipowners' Objections (Seamen's 
Rill) 

Women's .Appeal for Seamen 

Shipowners on Seamen's Bill 

Exceptional Shipowner, .An 

Seamen's Bill Gets a Boost (Minority 
Report ) 

What Will Congress Do? . 

Seamen's Bill in Congress (Descrip- 
tion of I'eatures) 

Legislation for Seamen 

This Is .Xo Dream (Seamen's Bill)... 

Manning Question. The 

Owners' Objections Answered 

Seamen's Bill in Senate 

House .Approves Seamen's Bill 

Safety Vs. Dividends 

Shipowners Stand Pat 

Seamen's Bill Delayed 

Tribute to Wilson 

Seamen's Bill as .Amended 

Seamen's Rill, The (La Follette 
.Amendments) 

Iceberg Detection 

Iceberg. The Deadly 

Iceberg, Sunk by 

Icebergs in the .Atlantic 

Idleness, The Disease of 

Illiteracy in California 

Immigration to Canada 

Immigration, Labor and 

Immigration Returns, Canadian 

India. Europeans in 

Indians in California 

Indictments, The Latest (Tveitmoe and 

Johannsen ) 

I ndustrial Schools, Xight 

1 ndustrial Commission 

Industrial Peace in Rritain 

Industrial Diseases 

Initiative and Referendum, U. S. Supreme 

Court on 

Information Wanted (U. S. Sanatorium)' 

31-10; 32-9; 33 

Insurance, Swiss Federal 

Insurance .Act, British 

Insurance, Sick, in Xorwaj' 

Insurance, Rritish Xational (By W'alter 

Macarthur) *. 

International T'rogress 

Is It Hypocrisy? 

Islands of Debris 

I smay. The Goat 

Italian-Turkish War, Casualties in 

Italy Declares War on Turkey 

Italv. Harbor Work in 

It Might Have Been Worse (By "El 

Tuerto" ) 

Jack and His Togs 

Japanese and Chinese Exclusion — 

Canada .Stands I'irni 

Shall the Japanese Control? 

Japanese Soldiers in Hawaii 

.Australia's Yellow Peril 

Japan, Death of Emperor 

Japanese Industries, Women in 

Judge, A Middle-.Age 

Justice Versus Charity 

King Frederick XIII of Denmark, Death 

of 



Lake Department — 

■"ilelifare" Sliip Xew- 

Passing of .Mr. Root 

Lake Steamers Undermanned 

Report on L.ike Steamers 

Look Out for Root ! 

■".A Good Bunch" 

Columbus Discovers .America! 

Inspector Misleads Public 

Improving ( ? ) the Personnel 

Seamen Reject Slavery 

Death I .ist of Members 

Has Their Master Consented? (Ry 
""Joshua Blunt") 

Death of Comrade Black (By "Joshua 
Hlunt") 

Death List of Members 

Seamen's Bill Vs. '"Hellfare" 

.Another Mutiny Case 

Stockholders Waking Up 

Deceased Members 

Report of Vice-President Olander 

Lake Seamen's LInion, The (By "Josh- 
ua Blunt") 

Olander an<l L;ike Seamen 

Lake Carriers E.xplain 

"Hellfare" Described 

Olander's Report (I. S. U. .A. Con- 
vention) 

Intern.'itional .Supports Lakes 

Conditions on Great Lakes 

.Seamen and Steel Trust (Olander's 
Testimon v) 



24 
24 

27 
28 
28 
30 
31 
31 
33 



34 
34 
35 

35 



35 
36 
37 

37 



38 
39 



39 
39 
40 
41 
43 
47 
47 
48 
48 
49 
50 
52 



10 

2 

8 

11 

11 

12 

13 

2 

10 

14 



6 
11 
6 
9 
8 



25 12 



-9: 


34-9 


29 


11 


46 


3 


46 


11 


50 


1 


52 


6 


13 


7 


49 


9 


^^^ 


6 


42 


14 


4 


13 


49 


8 


1 > 


7 


7 


10 


10 


6 


13 


11 


19 


12 


51 


9 


47 


14 


29 


9 


24 


6 


15 


6 



36 14 



1 


8 


4 


s; 


5 


1 


.s 


6 


3 


8 


8 


8 


8 


9 


9 


8 


9 


8 


9 


9 


9 


9 



10 

10 
10 

11 
11 
11 

12 
14 

15 
20 
21 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 



'Jitlc .\'o Page 

.Seanuii and Steel Trust (Olander's 

Testimony) 26 2 

Steel Trust .Methods 26 6 

Coulbv Confesses (By V. A. Olander) 27 8 
•Hellfare" Is Riglit -Xame (By V. A. 

Olander) _ 27 8 

.Simpson on Seamen's Bill 28 8 

"Protection" for Lake Seamen 30 8 

Constitution .Amended 31 9 

Lake Policy Changecf 33 6 

Lake Situation, The (By V. A. Olan- 
der) 33 8 

Lakes, liarly Commerce on (By "'Josh- 
ua Hlunt") 33 8 

Titanic, The (By Victor .\. Olander) 41 8 

Johnson, Fred, Death of 50 9 

F'lintje, Gust., Death of 51 9 

DnfTy, Martin J., Death of 51 9 

Orvis, Myron, Death of 52 9 

Labor and Politics, San Francisco 8 1 

Labor Against Tuberculosis II 6 

Labor in Special Session (Cal. Legisla- 
ture) 21 7 

Labor Needed, Xo (San Francisco) 23 6 

Labor .and Immigration 24 2 

l,abor, California Warns 27 2 

Labor, Hours of in Holland 28 10 

Labor Laws, Xew York 32 3 

Labor, Hours of 32 8 

L.-ibor Legislation for Women 39 11 

Labor Rejects Politics 40 6 

Labor and Politics 42 6 

Labor Xot a Commodity 44 8 

Labor Is Restless 44 9 

Labor, Migratory (By V. .A. Olander).. 45 8 

Labor Losses 46 8 

Labor, Scarcity of 49 9 

Labor Day Review (By Samuel Gom- 

pers) 51 1 

Labor Day at San Francisco 51 2 

Labor Day, Inauguration of 51 3 

Language Test, Chinese II 7 

Largest Sailing Ships 2 5 

Lascar Crews, .Against 30 6 

Launchmen .Adopt Rules 45 7 

Lawrence (Mass.) Strike Settled 28 13 

Law- Making for Seamen 42 8 - 

I.eith ;ind the Forth (By Walter .Mac- 
arthur ) 52 7 

Leprosy in the L'nited States 50 9 

Library, A Ship's 12 11 

Licensed Men, .About tlie 46 6 

Licensed Men Win Strike 50 6 

Licenses, Officers and 2 6 

■"Life and Labor" 21 11 

Lifeboats on Transports 34 3 

Lifeboat Rules, Xew 46 2 

Life Preserver, .A Xew 2 11 

Life-Saving .Apparatus, Xew Rules 43 13 

Life-Saving Device, Best SO 7 

Lighthouse for Salina Cruz 52 8 

l.ightkeepers. Wages of Wf)men ;is 23 15 

Liner, Xew Type of 29 2 

Liner, First .Motor Oce;in 40 8 

Liverpool Shipping (iains 4 10 

Living in Switzerland 8 10 

Lloyds' "A 1." Meaning of 23 11 

Loading Marks on Vessels 52 10 

Loans to Settlers 46 9 

Log Drifts on Pacilic Coast 42 5 

Log Raft, Wreck of 1 5 

Log Raft. Ban on I 7 

London, l-'ire Losses in 24 7 

London and Xew York 32 8 

London and Its Employes 41 10 

Lone Xavigators 24 2 

Los .Angeles Election , 8 7 

Los .\ngeles Primary Election Returns 9 12 

Los .Angeles Election Returns 13 12 

M 
Macarthur, Walter, European Correspondence — 

On the Olympic 49 1 

.\round Bristol Channel 51 7 

Leith and the Forth 52 7 

.M.ignets, Compasses Without 30 8 

Mail Company's Nerve 32 6 

.Maine. Report of External I'.xplosion . . 6 12 

Maine Retains Prohibition 10 12 

.Maine, Battleship, Report of Xavy Board 14 12 

Maine Floated 23 15 

Maine. lUirial of 27 15 

Man, F'ather of the 1 2 

Manchu Dynasty .Abdicates 24 14 

.Marine Engineers' Wages 41 10 

McNamara Case — 

r.oth Sides of the Case (Letters to 

Furuseth and Macarthur! 3 6 

J. J. .McXamara Elected .Secretary.... 3 15 

Trial I'.egins at Los .Angeles 5 15 

McX.imaras and Labor, The 6 6 

Mc.Vamara Defense League (Cal.).... 7 6 

Rurdette the Buffoon 10 6 

Labor Betrayed 12 6 

L.ibor on Record 13 7 

McXamaras Sentenced 13 12 

.McXamara Case, The 14 3 

Statement by .A. F. of L 14 3 

McXamara Case, The (By Prof. Geo. 

B. Foster) 16 8 

Grand Jury Methods (By Paul Schar- 

renberg) 18 7 

Socialist Vs. Trade-Unionist 21 1 

Thirtv-Two Indictments Returned.... 22 13 

I ..ibor Officials Indicted 24 13 

I'r.inklin, Detective, Pleads Guilty.... 25 13 

Merchant Shipping .Acts 50 9 

Merchant Marine, German 52 9 

.Messina, Rebuilding 27 9 

Metropolitan New York 16 11 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-FIVE. 



Title Xo, Page 

Mexico, .Madero Inaugurated President 10 13 

.Middle-Age Judge A 24 6 

.Mighty Voice Stilled, A (Justice Har- 
lan) 5 6 

•Migratory Labor (By V. A. Olander) . . 45 8 

.Miiitari-ni, Cost of 21 10 

.Militarism in Schools, .Against 46 8 

Militari>ni, Burden of 48 11 

-Militarj- Training in Schools 44 8 

.Miners' Strike, British 25 6 

.Miners' Turn, .American 29 7 

.Miners' .Minimum Wage 32 3 

.Miners (Britisli), Minimum Wage for.. 52 3 

.Mines. British Regulations for 36 8 

Minimum Wage (British Miners') Law 

Passed 29 4 

.Minimum Wage Law 48 (S 

".Missing." Seven Vessels 24 5 

.Mollendo, Fire at 40 9 

M ono])oly, Defending 33 11 

.Motor Vessel, Larg£st 28 8 

Motor Ocean Liner, First 40 8 

".Mutiny" on the Frye 30 6 

".Mutiny," The Olympic 42 1 

.Murderer Sentenced (Benson of .Ameri- 
cana Case ) 35 5 

N 

Xames of Rigs 41 11 

Xations, \Vealth of 46 9 

.Xaval Junk, Warships as 8 10 

Xaval Estimates. British 28 14 

.Xavigation of Suez Canal 4 2 

.Xavigation in North .Atlantic 30 9 

.Xavigators, Lone 24 2 

Xavv, Cuba to Have a 47 9 

Xel.s'on's Logbook Sold 10 13 

.Xews From Punta Arenas 13 6 

Xew York City, Cost of Government... 4 12 

Xew York, Metropolitan 16 11 

Xfw York, London and 32 8 

Xew York's Population 46 8 

.Xew York, Commerce of 46 13 

Xew Slavery. The 27 1 

Xew Type of Liner 29 2 

Xiagara Falls Xavigated..^ 7 14 

Xight Industrial Schools 48 II 

Xineteen Llexen, Progress of 12 I 

Xobcl Prizes Awarded 10 13 

Xo Hritish Empire 27 2 

Xome, .\laska, F.arliest .\rrival at 39 5 

Xorway. .Sick Insurance in 46 11 

.Xot Xeeded in Canada 43 9 

.Xumber Nine. Concerning 13 11 

O-P 

Ocean Currents and Weather 47 9 

( )lticers and Licenses 2 6 

<)ld .Age Pensions in .\ustralia 33 4 

Old Age, Cause of 40 14 

Oldest Sailing Ship 39 11 

( )lvnipic "Mutiny." The 42 1 

On the Olympic (By Walter .Macarthur) 49 1 
Organizing the Unorganized ( Hv J. B. 

Dale> ' 16 10 

Outlook. The British Seaman's 39 8 

Owners Object to Rules 49 7 

Pacific, South, Whaling in 2 10 

Pacilic Coast Wrecks 35 9 

Pacific .Mail Comijany's Receipts and 

E.xpenses 39 5 

Panama-Pacific Exposition. President 

Taft Breaks Ground 5 14 

Panama Canal, Progress of 20 13 

Panama Canal. First Ship Through 29 15 

Panama-Pacific Exposition Work Begun 32 12 

Pan.ama Registry Laws 41 8 

1 'an;inia Canal and Tolls 48 9 

Paris. Population of 39 14 

Passtnger.s Carried Coastwise (Pacilic). 30 5 

Paul, A Trade-unionist? Was 52 9 

Paupers in England 16 4 

Peace and .Arbitration : 7 9 

Peace, For World 11 6 

Pen-acola ( U. S. Frigate) Burned 35 5 

Pensioning Railway Employes 45 11 

Pension liill, .Amount of 36 12 

Pensions, Old .Age, in .\ustralia 17-4; 33-4 

Pensions. .\|)propriations for 51 12 

Peruvian Steamship, Xew 28 9 

•Phossy-Iaw" Bill Passed 32 10 

Pittsburgh's Population 46 8 

Police Power. Usurped 15 6 

Politics (San Francisco), Labor Rejects 40 6 

Politics, Labor and 42 6 

Poll Tax. Abolish the 44 2 

Poor Jack ( By "El Tucrto") 7 2 

Population of California 9 12 

Pop;''at'on of Canada 2-14; 6-14 

Population of China 3 13 

Population of h'rance 19 4 

P )pu'ation. Xew A'ork's 46 8 

Port of Bergen 16 11 

Port of Glasgow 47 9 

I'ortugal. Republic Recognized 2 13 

I'owers in the Pacific 28 10 

F'rice of L'npreparedness (Titanic) 40 I 

Prince Edward Island 34 11 

Principle of "Recognition" 8 6 

Prison Labor. Contract, .\holishcd in 

Oregon 4 15 

Profit-Sharing in England ^S 4 

Progress of 191 1 12 ! 

Progress of Wireless 16 9 

Progress and Poverty 45 1 

I^rogressive Party Created 45 12 

"Progressive''? What Is a 49 6 

Public Drydock, For a 28 7 

Pullman Company, Earnings of 6 14 

Punt;i Arenas, Xews from 13 6 

Purging Our Ranks 13 6 



'litle Xo. Page 

R 

Radical '-Leaders," About 48 6 

R;iilroads, U. S., Daily .Average of 

Killed and Injured 27 12 

Railroad, Pennsylvania, Killed and In- 
jured on 29 13 

Railroad .Accidents in United States.... 36 12 

Railway. Xew Trans-Andean 39 9 

Railway Employes, Pensioning 45 11 

Random Thoughts (By "El Tuerto")... 48 2 

Rats, The War on 50 2 

Reactionary, A Typical 49 8 

Rebuilding Messina 27 9 

Recall in California, Vote on 11 12 

"Recognition," Principle of 8 6 

Record Passages — 

Callao-.Aberdeen 20 5 

Hobart-Victoria 11 5 

Xewcastle, N. S. W.-San Francisco... 8 5 

X'ewcastle, X'. S. W.-San Francisco... 10 5 

San Francisco-Seattle 19 5 

San Francisco-Columbia River 34 5 

Santa Rosalia-.Astoria 23 5 

San l-^rancisco-Seattle 20 5 

Tatoosh-San Francisco 40 5 

Victoria, B. C.-Tacoma SO 5 

Record Coal Cargo, A 28 9 

Regulations for British Mines 36 8 

Revolution on the Sea 37 8 

Richardson Rock, For 11 10 

Right to Vote, The 12 6 

Rigs, Xames of 41 11 

Rubber. Xew Uses for 34 9 

Russell. William Clark, Death of 10 14 

S 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

.\bout the Convention (By Chas. ?iL 

Albrecht) 2 7 

Convention Delegates 3 6 

Seamen in British Columbia 4 6 

Delegates' Reports (Cal. State I^'ed. of 

Labor ) 4 7 

Usurped Police Power 15 (> 

Delegates' Report (I. S. U. A.) 17 7 

Longshoremen and Seamen 20 6 

Decision Reaffirmed (Sailors- Long- 
shoremen ) 22 6 

Get Ready for the Sixth ! 23 6 

Sailors Celebrate lo-night 25 6 

Memories of the Sixth 25 7 

Victoria Branch Opened 27 7 

Celebration of the Sixth 26 1 

.Seamen's Bill Indorsed 29 6 

Seamen Sue for Wages 30 7 

Seamen Sue in British Columbia 31 1 

Is There Law in Canada? 31 6 

Xo Law in Canada 34 (:> 

DECEASED M EMBERS. 

.Xndersen, Martin 27 7 

-Andersen. Peter 7 7 

.Andersen. Thorleif .A 45 7 

.Anderson. George 34 7 

.Andersson. Thomas 7 7 

-\ntonsen. .Alfred Conrad 11 7 

Hartell. William 14 7 

Boigtson, .Albert 31 7 

Bennett, John 19 7 

Benson, John 35 7 

I'.erglund, Carl Richard 33 7 

Bianca, Fellipo 32 7 

liroders, Peter ., 41) 7 

Bryggman, Herman 2 7 

Bulger, James 31 7 

Bystrom, Xils .Anton 23 7 

Carlson. John 19 7 

Caspary. Sigurd Ivar .August 11 7 

Cleanup, [""red 7 7 

Christensen, John Martin 31 7 

Christie, Frederick 51 7 

County, Henry 8 7 

Dixon, Harry 1 7 

Ekeland, Regnvald 3i< 7 

Engelgren, Louis 1 7 

Erickson, Charles 15 7 

h'ingal, Frederick 26 7 

I-"lowe. .\ugust 36 7 

Gibbons. Patrick 15 7 

Gilberson. Robert 21 7 

Greth. .\dolf W 45 7 

Hagen, Charles 27 7 

Hansen, Walter 41 7 

Healy. Joseph T 51 7 

Heiman. Rol)ert 32 7 

Ingalls, AVinslow Louis 24 7 

Jacobsen. Carl W. E 15 7 

Jensen, Jasper 19 7 

Jensen, .Anders Christian 38 7 

Joiianson, Xils 23 7 

Johansson, Gustaf Werner 9 7 

Johnson. John M 1 7 

Jorgensen, John 37 7 

Kay, John 38 7 

Kiesel. .Mexander Charles 39 7 

Kirstein, Johan .\ugust -. 7 7 

Knudsen, Jacob 40 7 

Kolostaff, Julius 31 7 

Koster, Cornelius John 4 7 

I.evold, Robert 34 7 

Lexljerg, Gustav Ivar 20 7 

Lundbcrg, Harold 19 7 

Maibohm. Hans 1 7 

Menning. Richard .' 19 7 

Martin, John 38 7 

McCarthy, Charles 39 7 

McXeill, John 36 7 

Mever, Herman ' 47 7 

Michaelson. .\ndrew 29 7 



Title .\'o. Page 

Moore, Thomas 28 7 

M oriarity. John Joseph 4 7 

-Mulherine, William 19 7 

Xeilson, Gustav Waldemar Edward.. 38 7 

Xichochasson, .Axel 19 7 

Nielsen, Xiels B 26 7 

Noonan, John 42 7 

Olsen. .Anton 2 7 

Olson, Otto Sigfrid 21 7 

Olsen, John 26 7 

Persson, Berhard 37 7 

Peterson, John Robert 14 7 

Ramstedt, Axel 15 7 

Robson, James 1 7 

Saart, August 23 7 

Salisburg, Daniel 33 7 

Salvesan, Jacob 5 7 

Sandstrom, Ernest Rudolph 40 7 

Severance. Joseph 47 7 

Silvan. Otto 35 7 

Stark. John 15 7 

Sundby, Emil 51 7 

Svensson, Chas 19 7 

Wilson, Henry 8 7 

West. J. .• 37 7 

Westerlund. Carl 38 7 

Wright. John 1 7 

Ziepke, Fritz 15 7 

Safety by Classes 49 7 

Safety in Wages 51 10 

Sailing Ship, .Auxiliary 29 11 

Sailing Ships, Largest 2 5 

Sailing .Ships of Sweden and Denmark.. 15 13 

Sailing Ships, Vanishing 4 2 

Sailing Vessels. Gasoline for 30 8 

Sailors' Snug Harbor 33 11 

Salina Cruz, Lighthouse for 52 8 

Salvage Law, Xew 50 10 

Sand, To Bind Moving 52 8 

Sandy's "Wee Barkie" (By "El Tuerto") 23 2 

San Francisco — 

(jompers at 2 1 

I-llection of .Mayor Rolph 3 14 

Sjjring Valley Water Company, 

Value of 7 12 

Tonnage of 11 10 

Xo Labor Xeeded 23 6 

Supervisors and Unemployed 25 6 

Unemployed in 30 7 

Increased Shipping of 42 5 

Popul.ition of 44 12 

Labor Day at 51 2 

Santa Rosa Verdict 6 6 

Santa Rosa, Captain Faria Suspended ... 7 5 

Sault Ste. Marie, Traffic at 12 11 

"Scarcity of .A. B.'s" (Titanic) 42 6 

Schmitz, Mayor, Indictments Dismissed 39 12 

School Census of United States 2 14 

Schools of Unionism 38 11 

Schools, Military Training in 44 8 

Schools. Against Militarism in 46 8 

Schools, Xight Industrial 48 11 

Scott's South Pole Expedition Heard 

From 29 14 

Sea. Bells Beneath the 11 7 

Sea, Revolution on the 37 8 

Sea-Born Hero, A 43 8 

Sea, Fire Dangers at 48 8 

Seaman, Disappearance of the 36 6 

Seaman's Outlook. The British 39 8 

Seas. Depth of the 47 8 

.Seamen Rewarded for Bravery 2-12; 8-14 

Seamen (British) Drowned in 1910 9 4 

Seamen, Citizenship of 13 6 

Seamen's Right to Vote 15 7 

Seamen's Ki-^hts, Defending 16 6 

Seamen's Legislative History 23 1 

Seamen and Steel Trust 25 1 

Seamen, Bravest of the Year 29 5 

Seamen on .American Ships 32 7 

Seamen's (Australian) Compensation .\ct 32 8 

Seamen. For Boats and 33 7 

.Seamen. Law-Mai ing for 42 8 

Seamen a Political Issue 43 6 

Seamen Moving Forward 44 6 

Seamen's Strike, French 46 6 

Seamen, Belgian, Strike of 48 7 

Seamen. Skilled, Scarce 51 3 

Seamen and Consumption 52 10 

Seaport, .An .Arizona 31 10 

Settlers, Loans to 46 9 

Shanghaiing Still in Vogue 14 6 

"Shanty" Bill's Dope (I5y "lil Tuerto"). 5 2 

Shi]), Oldest Sailing 39 II 

.Shipbuilding .\grecment 43 8 

Shipbuilding, The Year's 44 8 

.Shi|)building Industry. German 45 2 

.Sliii)buil(ling. United Kingdom 45 II 

Shiiiowners ;ind Shiimiasters 43 2 

Shii)i)ing. .American, I""acts of 9 6 

Shippin.g, British, Tonnage of 22 15 

.Shii)ping Gains. Liverpool 4 10 

Shiijping, Great Lakes, Tonnage of 22 15 

Shipping Statistics, French 40 8 

Shipping Record, Hongkong 43 U) 

Ships, Building Big 4 2 

■Ships Without I''unnels 7 II 

Ship's Library, A 12 11 

Ships That Xever Return 13 11 

Ships, British, and Subsidies 23 8 

Ships of Sixty Years Ago 29 9 

Ships of the -Ancients 36 10 

.Shi))s Building for the Coast 37 10 

Shorthanded (By "El Tuerto") 15 2 

Sick Insurance in Norway 46 11 

Single Tax Recommended in British Co- 

L'.mhia 21 12 

.Skyscraper. The (jreatcst 7 10 

Slavery. The Xew 27 1 

Socialism? Xot Just Yet! 22 6 

Socialist Vs. Trade-Unionist 21 1 



COAST Si:.\ME.\"S JOLRXAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTV-1- 1\"E. 



Title Xo. Page 

Socialist Incendiarism 21 6 

Song, Poem, (Bv "Star Key'") 4 11 

South Pole Discovered by Amundsen... 26 14 

South Seas, Whaling in 32 9 

Spartans, Sons of 1 ^ 

Speaking Without Wires 24 9 

State. VVoman and the 1 ^ 

Steamboalmen Gain Increase 45 7 

Steamship Lines to Tahiti 41 8 

Steel Trust. Karnings of 22-12; 29-12 

Steel Trust. Earnings of Employes 22 13 

Steel Trust, Seamen and 25 1 

Steel Trust. J. P. Morgan's Profits 26 12 

Steel Trust Employes and Wages 28 13 

Steel Trust, The Greedy 49 10 

Still They Come! (South African Sea- 
men's Union) 4 6 

Strike, British Miners' 25 6 

Strike at Lawrence, Mass., Settled 28 13 

Strike Bill, Argentine ••■ 44 9 

Strike, Coal, Effects of the 47 8 

Strike of Belgian Seamen 48 7 

Strikebreakers "Educated" 45 6 

Striker, Courage of the ^ 29 8 

Strikes in Bavaria ' 3 15 

Strikes. Taft on 23 6 

Strikes in Germany 45 2 

St. Helena, Vessels at 49 11 

Stolypin, Russian Premier, Assassinated 2 13 

Suh.sidies, British Ships and 23 8 

Suez Canal, Dividends on 39 14 

Suez Canal. Navigation of 4 2 

Suez Canal Operations 48 2 

Suez Canal Shares 49 13 

Suez Canal, Success of the 50 9 

Suffrage, Woman and (By "El Tuerto") 1 11 

Sunk by Iceberg 34 8 

Supervisors and Unemployed (San Fran- 
cisco) 25 6 

Sweden and Denmark, Sailing Ships of.. 15 13 

Swiss I'ederal Insurance 29 11 

Swinnniiig the l-'nglish Channel 1 13 

Switzerl.md. Living in 8 10 

T 

Tahiti, Steamship Lines to 41 8 

Taft on Strikes 23 6 

Talking Through Water 33 11 

Tasmania, Political Parties in 49 14 

The Scab. Poem (By Berton Brayley) . . 3 9 

The Old Ghost (By "El Tuerto") 20 2 

The Pier-Head Jumper (By "El Tuerto") 30 2 

This Is the Stuff!..... 34 7 

Timber Deckloads 48 11 

Time in I'"rance Changed 31 14 

Titanic, Loss of — 

Titanic, The— 31-6; 31-15; 32-1; 32-2; 

32-6; 32-15; 33-1; 33-6; 34-1; 34-14; 

34-15; 35-8; 35-15; 36-7; 36-8; 37-2; 

38-6; .38-8; .39-6; .39-15; 40-1; 41-7; 

41-8; 42-6; 43-7 

Titanic Prophecy. A 35 8 

Women at the Oars 35 9 

Lesson of Titanic Disaster 36 8 

Senate Report on Titanic 38 6 

Experts on Titanic Wreck 38 8 

Thanks of Congress to Captain Ros- 

tron 44 13 

Titanic Inquiry, The 51 6 

Tolstoi's Widow Pensioned 21 14 

Tonnage, San Francisco 11 10 

Tonnage of British Shipping 22 15 

Tonnage on Great Lakes .'.... 22 15 

Tow- Barges Stranded 3 12 

Tow-Barges and Log-Rafts (By An- 
drew l-'uruseth ) 4 1 

Trade-Unionist? Was Paul a 52 9 

Trade-Unions, l'"eatures of 47 11 

Tribute to the lingineers (Titanic) 42 9 

Trans-.\ndean Railway, New 39 9 

Trade Disputes, World's 35 8 

Transports. Lifeboats on 34 3 

Trade-Unions, British. Number and Fi- 
nances of 26 4 

Trade-Union Congress. British 6 2 

Trade-Unions of World, Members of... 12 4 

Transatlantic Route, New 16 9 

Tuberculosis in California 21 12 

Tuberculosis, Labor .Xgainst 11 6 

u-v 

Undermanning, Effects of (By .\ndrew 

I'urusetli ) 1 1 

Unemployed, San Francisco Supervisors 

and ..'. 25 6 

Unemployed in San Francisco 30 7 

Undermanning of Vessels 13 10 

Undermanning, British 39 9 

"Under Two Flags" (By "El Tuerto").. 40 2 

Unemployment No Joke 16 6 

U?iion Label Bread. Buy 4 2 

"Union Labor" Party Defeated 10 12 

Union Shop on .\tiantic Coast 1 15 

■"Unions and Safety at Sea" 37 7 

Unions, Dual, .■\malganiate 46 7 

Unions. German, in 1910 20 11 

Unionism. Schools of 38 ]] 

Unionizing British Navy 50 10 

United Kingdom Shipbuilding 45 11 

Unpreparedness. Price of (Titanic) 40 1 

United States, Employes of 3 15 

United States, Per-Capita Circulation in 15 12 



Title No. Pagi- 

L'nited States Senators. For Election of 

by Direct Vote 37 12 

United States Government Revenue.... 44 12 

United States Constitution, The 47 8 

United States, Leprosy in the 50 9 

Vanishing Sailing Ships 4 2 

Vanishing Fleet. The 45 2 

Vessels. Undermanning of 13 10 

Vessels Posted "Missing" (1911) 22 5 

Vessels, Loading Marks on 52 10 

W-Y-Z 

Wage. Miners' Minimum 32 3 

Wage-F-arners, Number of in United 

States 32 13 

Wage Scale in Bohemia. New 38 9 

Wage Law, Minimum 48 8 

Wage, Minimum for .Miners (British)... 52 3 

Wages, Hawaiian Plantation 49 S 

Wages, Marine Engineers' 41 10 

Wages, Safety in .^1 Ki 

War. Cost of 51 8 

War on Rats. The 50 2 

\\ arships as Naval Junk 8 Id 

Waste Through F'ire 45 11 

Water, Talking Through 33 11 

Wealth of Nations 46 9 

Weather. Ocean Currents and 47 9 

Whale Doomed. The 49 8 

Whaling in South Pacific 2 10 

Whaling Industry. The 29 10 

Whaling in South Seas 32 9 

What of the Future? 16 1 

What Is a "Progressive"? 49 6 

When Danger's O'er (Steam-Schooner 

Washington) 10 6 

When Ida Lewis Kept the Light 31 2 

When the Canal Is Finished 36 2 

Wilson, Joseph Havelock — 

ll.ivelock Wilson Coming 5 7 

Wilson, J. II.. on His Wav 26 6 

Wilson, J. Havelock, Our Guest 38 1 

All Ready for Wilson 39 6 

Seamen Welcome Wilson 40 6 

Wilson Enters Golden Gate 40 7 

Wilson .Addresses Seamen 41 1 

Wilson at Sailors' Meeting 41 2 

Pleasure and Profit 41 6 

.\u Revoir Banquet, The 42 2 

Wilson on the Sound 43 2 

Wilson, Havelock, With 22 2 

Wilson, Havelock. on Labor 28 2 

Wires, Speaking Without 24 9 

"Withdrawn. .Xpologized for" 11 11 

Wireless Records — 

Mare 1 sland, Cal 1-14; 7-5 

.■Vorfolk. (Va.)— Mare Island, Cal 21 15 

.S;in F'rancisco — Japan 4 5 

Spitzbergen, Station at 8 13 

Station on Falkland Islands 3 5 

Pago- Pago — San I'rancisco 45 5 

Papeete — San I-'rancisco 45 5 

Wireless, Progress of 16 9 

Wireless, Cannery Vessels I-'itted With 25 5 

Wireless in Central .America 45 2 

Woman and the State 1 7 

Woman and Suffrage (By "F'l Tuerto") 1 11 

Woman Steamboat Master 6 12 

Woman Suffrage Carried in California... 5 14 

Women's Eight-Hour Law (Cal.) Stands 37 7 

Women in Japanese Industries 29 9 

Women. Labor Legislation for 39 11 

Workmen's Compensation — 

W orkmen's Compensation 1 6 

Justice, Not Charity 1 11 

.\cw Compensation Law 2 2 

No. 10 on the Ballot 2 6 

Workingmen's Insurance 3 1 

Why the Roseberry (Cal.) Law? 9 7 

"Compensation" Not W^ord 11 11 

Old Defenses .Abrogated 12 7 

Fjni)loyers' Liability 15 11 

Employers' Liabilitv Upheld 18-6; 20-3 

City Not Liable Under Law (Cal.)... 22 13 

Employers' Liability 24 11 

Compensation in California (I'irst Case 

Decided) 27 6 

I'irst Comi)ensation Case (Cal.) 27 7 

Some Ounces of Prevention 29 2 

Workmen's Compensation 32 3 

Seamen's (.Australian) Compensation 

Act 32 8 

How They Do It in Germany 32 11 

".Accident"? What Is an .34 8 

F'mployers and Workmen -Act 34 8 

Massachusetts Compensation Law.... 39 3 

Workers' Unrest Defined 50 8 

World-Peace. For II 6 

World's Trade Disputes 35 8 

Wrecks in Australian Waters 11 5 

Wrecks Posted at Lloyds (1911) 22 5 

Wrecks "Missing" During 1911 26 ? 

Wrec'- s of a Generation 34 11 

Wrecks, Pacific Coast 35 9 

Wrecks — 

.Nbeona 6 12 

Admiral 19 5 

.Mice M. Lawrence 13 14 

Alleghanv 21 15 

.\lsen 20 5 



14 
14 

5 
12 

5 
14 
14 

5 

14 

14 

16-5 

5 

15 
15 
15 
15 
15 

5 
13 
14 
14 
15 
13 
15 



12 
14 
13 
14 
-5 
14 

5 
13 

5 
29-15 



29- 



Title No. Page 

.\ntigua 11 14 

.\rmeria 37 5 

Arni 32 15 

.\ugsburg 28 14 

Axenfels 28 14 

Bertha F. Walker 12-14; 1.3-14 

Bessie Whiting 1 12 

Cachepal 32 5 

Carara 11 13 

Carmencita 18 5 

Charles II. Wolston 12 

Chesapeake 15 

Com et 2 

Coronation 5 

Dunearn "' 17 

ICastern Light 12 

!•:. C. Mowatt 13 

Ellisland 17 

Emma Knowlton 4 

I'.mily .A. .Staples 9 

l-'.mpress of China -.4-5; 10-5; 14-5; 

h:rna 41 

b>ne 24 

Fstelle 36 

luiphrates 23 

I'annie Prescott 42 

Flora M. Hill 27 

F. S. Redfield 5 

(ieni 45 

Genoa 21 

George May 12 

George P. Hudson 17 

Georgies 8 

Gesso 30 

Gulf Stream... 10-5; 11-5; 17-5; 20-5; 

24-5; 25-5; 30-5; 43-5 

llartfield 5 13 

I lavden Brown 36 5 

Helen W. Martin 3 

i lelen .\. Wyman 13 

Helvetia 51 

Heroine 14 

Ida McKay 23-5; 25-5; 

Indian Empire 30 

Iroquois 1 

Ixion 5 

Jessie Minor * 3 

John W^ Hall 27-15; 

Joseph Russ 35 

Judge Pennewell 42 

Kinrosshire II 

Knight of St. George 13 

Koombana 30 

I .ady Napier 4 

Liberte 3 

Lilv :.. 6 

Lois V. Chapels 10 

Lordos Byron 10 

Madeline Cooney 19 

Madison 24 

Malcolm B. Seavey 5 

.Margaret A. May 1-12; 

Mary .Adelaide Randell 19 

Mary B. Baird 45 

Massachusetts 7 

Mathilde 2 

Max 27 

.Multnomah 8 

Maxwell 28 

Nordstern 6 

North Star 20 

Oceana 2i< 

Oliver Mitchell 4 

Oliver J. Olson 5-5 

Patrician 28 

Perdita 5 

Pindos 26 

Pleiades ' 52 

Pollux 29 

I'rins Valdemar 8-5; 

Queen Victoria 40 

R.ifael .__. 16_ 

Ramona 1-5; 2-5 

Record 3 

Reliance 11 

Rhoda 24 

Romania 13 

Rosecrans 30 

Rosedale 6 

Russ 19 

Ruth E. Godfrey 18-15; 20-5; 

-S.iilor Boy 4 

San Rafael 8 

-Sarah Wood 5 

Sarah D. F"ell 13 

Sol way 17-5; 

Stella n. Kaplan .3-12; 

St. Bride 11-13; 12-14 

Stephen G. Hart 3-12: 4-14 

Stephen G. Loud 9-14; 11-14 

Sterling (Barge) 19 15 

Sr.san and .Mary 9 14 

Texas 34 14 

Thaxter 2ii 14 

Thekla 10 5 

Thistleroy 18 15 

Thordis 1 -5 

Tranznares 16 15 

Tucapel 1 13 

Vida 34 5 

Whisper 2 12 

William Nottingham 6 5 

Wistow Hall 19 4 

Wvnian. .Surgeon-General. Death of 12 14 

Youth Will he Served (By "El Tuerto") 35 2 



15 



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15 
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15 

1.3 

5 

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6-5 

15 

5 

5 

5 

14 

9-5 

5 

15 

; 3-5 

12 

14 

15 

13 

5 

5 

4 

30-5 

5 

13 

12 

14 

24-5 

4-14 



^^-^ascffiSisS^'^ 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 




A Journal o( Seamen, by Seamen, (or Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Juitice by Organization. 




VOL. XXV, No. 1. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 191 1. 


Whole No. 2 138. 





EFFECTS OF UNDERMANNING. 



Understanding Orders. 

The influence of insurance on safety at 
sea nowhere shows itself more completely 
than in the fact that vessels will go to sea 
with men who are unable to understand the 
orders of the officers. There are very few 
kinds of employment where promptness in 
obedience are so necessary as at sea. 

The officer finds that something must be 
done at once or the vessel and possibly the 
cre\v will be lost. He shouts his orders 
from the bridge. If the orders are under- 
stood and promptly obeyed all is perhaps 
well. If the orders are not understood they 
can not be obeyed, and here you have a case 
for the insurance adjuster, and very likely 
some new faces in heaven. 

Take the average Chinese crew. On deck 
there is Boatswain No. 1 and Boatswain No. 
2. These two men understand sufficient of 
the language of the officers to be able to 
translate the orders to the men who are 
supposed to obey them. Very likely the 
officer is excited, the translators more so, 
and the crew still worse. The time given 
for action is frittered away and disaster 
follows. 

Now, please imagine that this crew, be- 
sides being deaf are also paralyzed by not 
knowing how to obey because they have no 
skill, and you have the real reason for per- 
haps one-half of the marine disasters. The 
men who could understand and obey are 
left on shore because they are not willing to 
take the wages offered. 

Wages, you see, are paid by the owner of 
the vessel ; insurance is paid by the public. 
Besides, the owner may sometimes be will- 
ing to sell his vessel ; no other purchaser 
appearing, he sells to the insurance com- 
pany. To this man the crew which can 
not understand or speak or obey is the very 
crew he wishes. 

In cases of collision such crews are almost 
invaluable. Their lack of language causes 
the loss of the vessel and then helps to save 
the insurance money for the owner ! Orien- 
tals are peculiar for other reasons. They 



have a peculiar idea that they become re- 
sponsible for any man whom they save from 
death, so there is very little chance of any 
of the passengers being saved, particularly 
if they are injured. This is another ad- 
vantage. Sometimes living men come higher 
in damages than dead ones. 

There is another peculiarity about the 
Chinese crew. They smoke opium on the 
vessel and many vessels have special rooms 
set aside for this very purpose. Let us now 
see what this really means. The vessel 
having this kind of a crew meets another 
vessel which has a crew that can understand 
and obey. The latter, let us suppose, has 
the right of way under the "rule of the 
road," and keeps on her course, fully ex- 
pecting that the other vessel will act ac- 
cording to the rule, but finding at the last 
moment that she does not, there is an effort 
to avoid the collision. The "rule of the 
road" is disobeyed by both vessels. Some- 
times this prevents the disaster; sometimes 
it does not, and the chances are that the 
vessel which is properly manned and which 
is seeking to avoid the disaster may finally 
be adjudged to be in fault. 

There is the same trouble in the engine- 
room. There is a "No. I," a "No. 2" and a 
"No. 3" man. Each of these men under- 
stands the language of the officers and is 
employed as translator and leading man. As 
long as everything is running smoothly this 
goes well enough. The men on deck or in 
the engine-room and fire-room may growl 
and curse the officer up hill and down dale; 
the officer does not understand, and it does 
not hurt him. If he forgets himself to the 
extent of giving an order to one of these 
men the man stares at him and answers 
"no savvy." The man who does "savvy" 
is called and is given the order, which is 
then obeyed. 

Now, who is the officer of the watch in 
such case? Is it not, in fact, the interpreter? 
With all this, officers very often like that 
arrangement. They are usually treated with 
deference by the interpreter and also, so far 
as they know, by the others. The Oriental 



becomes agreeable to even the most cynical 
of men in authority. 

Some shipowners like Orientals because 
of their cheapness; some officers like them 
because of their servility. Shipwrecks and 
other difficulties do not happen every day, 
and when they do the public, save and ex- 
cept the seamen, is the greatest sufferer, 
either as passengers or as paymasters. No 
vessel should be permitted to leave any port 
with a crew the members of which are not 
sufficiently versed in the language of the of- 
ficers to understand the orders given on 
shipboard. 

Proposed Manning Law. 

Section 13 of H. R. 11372, introduced in 
the present Congress by Hon. William B. 
Wilson, of Pennsylvania, provides that "no 
vessel shall depart from any port of the 
United States unless she shall have in her 
service and on board a crew seventy-five 
per cent, of which in each department there- 
of shall be able to understand any lawful 
order given by the officers of such vessel." 

We believe that no vessel should be per- 
mitted to become a danger to other vessels 
out in the ocean. While there may be some 
merit in the argument usually made, that 
the master and the seamen who are willing 
to risk their lives know best and should 
not be interfered with, such merit is very 
small. 

To begin with, the party really respon- 
sible is safe on shore. The master and oth- 
er officers are very likely married ; they 
must eat, and they must find the means to 
furnish their wives and children with some- 
thing to eat. If they are not willing to go 
somebody else will, so they take the chance, 
though it is sometimes a very long one. 
The men who accept the employment 
usually know nothing about the other men 
who are to sail with them until they have 
signed the ship's articles, and then it is too 
late to kick. 

Let us assume that they do know and 
that the whole crew from the master to the 
youngest boy realize their risks and are will- 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A. F. OF L. CONVENTION CALL. 



American Federation of Labor, 
Headquarters. 801-809 G St., N. W., 
Wa.shington, D. C, Sept. 9, 19n. 
To All Affiliated Unions, Greeting: 

You are hereby notified that, in pursu- 
ance to the Constitution of the American 
Federation of Labor, the Thirty-first Annual 
Convention of the American Federation of 
Labor will be held at Atlanta's Main Audi- 
torium. Atlanta. Ga., beginning ten o'clock 
Monday morning, November 13, 1911, and 
will continue in session from day to day un- 
til the business of the Convention has been 
completed. 

Representation. 

Representation in the Convention will be 
on the following basis: From National or 
International Unions, for less than 4.000 
members, one delegate; 4,000 or more, two 
delegates; 8.CXX) or more, three delegates; 
16.000 or more, four delegates; 32,000 or 
more, five delegates; 64,000 or more, six 
delegates; 128,000 or more, seven delegates, 
and so on ; and from Central liodies and 
State Federations, and from local trade 
unions not having a .Xational or Interna- 
tional Tnion, and from Federal Labor 
I'nions. one delegate. 

Organizations to be entitled to representa- 
tion must have obtained a certificate of 
affiliation (charter) at least one month prior 
to the Convention; and no person will be 
recognized as a delegate who is not a mem- 
ber in good standing of the organization he 
is elected to represent. 

Only bona fide wage-workers, who are 
not members of. or eligible to membership 
in other trade unions, are eligible as dele- 
gates from Federal Labor Unions. 

Delegates must be selected at least two 
weeks i)revious to the Convention, and their 
names forwarded to the Secretary of the 
American Federation of Labor inmiediately 
after their election. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats in the 
Convention unless the tax of their organ- 
izations has been paid in full to September 
30, 1911. 

It is. of course, entirely unnecessary here 
to enumerate the imminent important sub- 
jects with which our forthcoming Conven- 
tion will concern itself, but the reminder is 
not at all amiss that every eflfort must be 
made to broaden the field and means for the 
organization of the yet unorganized work- 
ers, to strive more effectually than ever to 
bring about a better day in the lives and 
homes of the toilers, to defend and maintain 
by every honorable means in our power the 
right to organize for our common defense 
and advancement, and to assert at any risk 
the freedom of speech and of the press and 
the equal rights before the law of every 
worker with every other citizen. These and 
other great questions of equal importance 
will, of necessity, occupy the attention of 
the .Atlanta Convention. 

Therefore the importance of our organiza- 
tions and our movement, the duty of the 
hour and for the future, demand that every 
organization entitled to representation shall 
send its full quota of delegates to the At- 
lanta Convention. November 13, 1911. 

Do not allow favoritism to influence you 
in selecting your delegates. Be fully repre- 
sented. 

Be represented by your ablest, best, most 
experienced, and faithful members. 



Credentials. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated unions. The original creden- 
tials must be given to the delegate-elect and 
the duplicate forwarded to the American 
Federation of Labor office, 801-809 G Street 
Northwest, Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet 
at the headquarters of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor six days previous to the 
opening of the Convention, and will report 
immediately upon the opening thereof at At- 
lanta; hence secretaries will observe the 
necessity of mailing the duplicate creden- 
tials of their respective delegates at the ear- 
liest possible moment to Washington, D. C. 
Grievances. 

l^ider the law no grievance can be con- 
sidered by the Convention that has been 
decided by a previous Convention, except 
upon the recominendation of the Executive 
Council, nor will any grievance be con- 
sidered where the parties thereto have not 
previously held conference and attempted to 
adjust the same themselves. 

S.X.MllCI. ("lO.MPKKS, 

President of American I'"e(leration 
of Labor. 
-Attest: 1''kank Morri.son, Secretarv. 



FATHER OF THE MAN. 



All admit that human affairs are awry. 
We do not get the best out of life, nor do 
we make the most of our opportunities. 
Yet there never was a time when so many 
noble men and women were devoting their 
time and money to bettering the race. 
Wherein lies the weakness of their efforts? 
Fifty years ago the crime line was up 
among adults ; to-day it is down among the 
the children. Why this general descent 
into wickedness and weakness? 

As we rear our children to manhood, 
strong and honorable, or weak and vile, so 
will government be. Hence child develop- 
ment is the paratBOunt issue of all time. 
The following figures tell the story of to- 
day: 

.Vumber of minors in the United States, 
about 46.000,000. 

Number of children between five and 
seventeen years of age, 24,362,936. 

Average daily attendance at educational 
in.stitutions, 11,617,834. 

Average number of days attended by each 
pupil last year, 74.5. 

Is that not a startling array of figures? 
Where are ail the other children? As half- 
baked bread will give an individual dys- 
pepsia, so will half-developed children give 
free government dyspepsia. 
O ye blind and selfish freemen boasting of 

your land and time, 
While the children soak and blacken soul 
and sense in filth and crime. 
I lay this down as the fundamental duty 
of all life's duties : the proper care of the 
child means righteous conduct of men. As 
the twig is bent, the tree inclines. Give 
every child the right guidance and you will 
abolish, or at least minimize, the social evil, 
the divorce problem, grafting, drinking, 
gambling — all man's inhumanities to man. 
Make every schoolhouse a home where 
teachers shall marry and settle down and 
raise a family. Make the buildings com- 
fortable and commodious as money will do. 
Give the whole a real home atmosphere by 
having trees, flowers, grassplots and play- 
grounds. Have every orphan child in each 



district taken into this school-home as one 
of the family, and have every poor child re- 
ceive at least one healthful meal each day. 

As child idleness is as detrimental as 
child labor, make each school-home a farm 
where each child would learn to love and 
respect labor and also help to sustain the 
school. Our present school system teaches 
the child to despise and hate labor; to love 
ease, dudish appearance and city life. 

Have the Government treat the children 
with at least the same consideration it now 
treats the millionaires. If five rich men 
want to double the earning capacity of their 
money they start a national bank, buy a 
Government bond, deposit the bond back 
with the Government, get a good rate of 
interest thereon and dollar for dollar of 
their investment back in bank notes. If the 
children of the neighborhood need a school- 
house their parents vote school district 
l)onds, deposit them with the bank and pay 
it a high rate of interest for the money the 
National Government gave the bank for 
nothing. Suppose the school bonds run for 
twenty years and draw 6 per cent interest, 
it would mean that for every dollar the 
children got out of such taxes the bank 
would get $1.20. Shall not parents demand 
that the Government shall issue school 
notes on school district bonds as it now 
issues bank notes to banks? 

Commission each school teacher a post- 
master. One mail carrier in an automobile 
could deliver the mail to many school- 
houses, and take up the outgoing mail each 
day. The children going home each even- 
ing would deliver the mail at home. Thus 
would be solved the question of a daily 
rural mail. 

Two generations of such a school system 
would completely change our nature and 
we would become an entirely different peo- 
ple. Morally and mentally we would be as 
giants compared to pigmies in comparison 
with our present development. 

Too many editors, preachers and other 
reformers incline to put new cloth into old 
garments — which Jesus said should not be 
done. Juvenile courts are good ; orphan 
asylums are good ; houses of detention are 
good ; reformatories are good ; but they are 
all patchwork. Each individual is an entity 
and must receive personal consideration or 
he may become a Jukes or a James. 

As we can more readily comprehend ma- 
terial things than we can spiritual things, 
let us consider the growth of flowers in 
California as compared with the same kind 
of flowers in Canada. That is a fair com- 
parison of the mental and spiritual growth 
of a child, always in a loving home atmos- 
phere, when compared with a child reared 
in vile and degrading surroundings. 

Let us strike out boldly for big things. 
Let us cut the tap root of selfishness and 
vice. Give the children the proper environ- 
ment and we will soon have another order 
of human beings. — John F. Murray. 



.\ juice boiled out of a tiny bean by the 
Japanese is said to be an excellent substi- 
tute for cow's milk. 



.Automatic machines which clean 3600 fish 
an hour are in use in the salmon canneries 
of the Pacific Coast. 



On over 2300 miles of American railroads 
the telephone superseded the telegraph for 
dispatching last year. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



McNAMARA DEFENSE FUND. 



ALL TRADE-UNIONS, INDIVIDUAL 
TRADE-UNIONISTS AND THE PUB- 
LIC AT LARGE ARE URGED BY THE 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE McNA- 
MARA DEFENSE FUND. CONTRIBU- 
TIONS MAY BE SENT TO THE OF- 
FICE OF THE COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL OR TO FRANK MORRISON, 
SECRETARY, AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR, 801-809 G ST., N. W., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Gompers at San Francisco. 

Sc]iteml)er 4 was a red-letter day in the 
history of the labor movement of San Fran- 
cisco. Tens of thousands of unionists 
marched through the streets and 20,000 
l)co|)le gatliered at Shell Moimd Park, Oak- 
land, and listened to a stirring address by 
President Gompers. 

I'resident Gompers began his present 
campaign in Denver, Colo., has been enthu- 
siastically received and has addressed mon- 
ster gatherings in Denver, Salt Lake City, 
Pocatello, Butte, Missoula, Spokane, Seat- 
tle, Vancouver, Tacoma, Portland, San 
Francisco, San Jose, Santa Cruz and Oak- 
land. 

Speaking in Missoula to a large gather- 
ing, President Gompers had this to say on 
the kidnaping of the McNamara brothers: 

A few months ago in Los Angeles an explosion 
occurred. No one knows now how that explo- 
sion occurred. I will not plead extenuating cir- 
cumstances for a man that could be guiUy of 
such an awful deed, such sacrifice of human life. 
A short time ago, purely as a matter of greed, 
they burned' men and women in New York. 
Thousands of your fellow men are killed an- 
nually. None believe in retaliation, they say that, 
l)Ut you can't expect that the laboring man would 
be deaf to one and have all sympathy for the 
other. Before the sound of the explosion had died 
away, the enemies of labor said we had com- 
mitted a great crime. The American Bridge 
Company, part of the United States Steel Cor- 
poration, the merchants and manufacturers of 
I^os Angeles, with great corporate power, con- 
centrated in trying to deal labor unions the death 
blow. Tliey went into Indianapolis and Chicago 
and bodily stole two men away from tlicir homes 
and from their States. Kidnaping is a euphonious 
term applied to the taking of these men. With- 
out giving them a chance to see a fellow citizen 
or lawyer; without having an opportunity to de- 
fend themselves, they say that they had the right 
to abduct them from the State in which they lived. 
Tliey were dragged thousands of miles across 
the continent and thrown into jail on charges of 
the gravest nature. Detective Burns says that 
detectives are the greatest set of criminals and 
I think the estimate he placed on the other de- 
tectives can well be placed on him. If these men 
were sure that the evidence against the McNam- 
ara boys was conclusive, would they not have 
been given an opportunity of being heard in the 
courts of Indiana and Illinois? We arc trying to 
prevent for all time to come the repetition of such 
n:an-stealing methods. You don't think that any- 
nr.e would' try to steal Rockefeller or Gould. We 
are engaged in this conflict, not alone to provide 
ample defense for the McNamara boys, but we 
will secure, if possible, the conviction of those 
who engaged in the man-stealing. 



"Go Thou and Do Likewise." 

Imbued with the spirit that made Rome 
the mistress of the world, striking workers 
at Elba are determined to vvin or perish in 
the battle they are now waging against 
their employers. 

The sight of starving women and children 
has often unnerved men fighting for indus- 
trial emancipation, and the organized work- 
ers of Italy are determined that the men of 
Elba will not have to face such an ordeal. 



They have made plans to take the women 
and children, especially the children, from 
the strike district and leave the men un- 
trammeled in their battle to abolish the hor- 
rible conditions under which they have been 
forced to labor. 

Many of the dependents of the strikers 
have been already conveyed to other dis- 
tricts to be cared for by unionists and it 
was a memorable day in Rome when thou- 
sands of union men and women gathered at 
the railroad station to receive a group of 
children who had been consigned to their 
care. Strong men shouted and wept when 
the little ones arrived. The women gathered 
them into their arms and they were carried 
away amidst cheers to be housed and fed 
and comforted until their fathers had gained 
the victory that would ensure ctnnfortable 
homes and sufficient food and raiment for 
them. 

Italian unii)nisin is marching on. The 
members of the imions are showing a spirit 
of self-sacrifice that will carry their move- 
ment to victory. 



Federation's Contention Upheld. 

The following telegram from y\ttorney 
Seyfried, the legal representative of the A. F. 
of L. at Indianapolis, was received at head- 
quarters on September 7: "Circuit Court 
to-day decided that City Court (Judge Col- 
lins) has no jurisdiction in extradition 
cases." 

Judge James A. Collins of the police court, 
who turned over John J. McNamara to the 
California authorities, has contended that he 
had jurisdiction in extradition proceedings. 
The decision just handed down by the Cir- 
cuit Court in the case of one Rochelle, who 
was wanted in Toledo, shows that Judge 
Collins exceeded his authority. 

In July, Mayor Shank of Indiana])olis 
had a conference with Chief of Police ITv- 
land, in which he expressed a doubt as to 
whether the police court was a court of 
proper jurisdiction to take prisoners in- 
volved in extradition proceedings. He said 
then : "Not being a lawyer, of course I do 
not know whether Judge Collins has juris- 
diction in such cases, or not. That I suppose 
will be decided in September by Judge 
Remster." 

The decision as handed down by the Cir- 
cuit Court upholds the contentions of the 
A. F. of L. in the kidnaiiing of J. J. Mc- 
Namara. 



Will Contest Taylor System. 

Machinists employed in the Navy Yard at 
Washington have taken a decided stand 
against the introduction of the Taylor sys- 
tem. The men say it is being introduced 
gradually and that they are determined to 
resist further encroachments. Columbia 
Lodge, International Association of Machin- 
ists, with a membership of 1,400, has a])- 
pointed a committee to wait on the author- 
ities at the Navy Yard and inform them that 
its members are opposed to the system and 
will stand out against it. It has called for 
action on t'le part of the Metal Trades De- 
partment of the A. F. of L. and has ar- 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, lyi 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, l>i Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St.. 
Chicago, III. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Unitcvl Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade. Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mai'- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E.. 

England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norwaj'. 

Norsk Matros og Fyrboter Union, Skippergaten 
4, Kristiani.1. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nedcrlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing,"' Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Fcderazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
bcitcr und Arbeiterinnen Oesterrcichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrcra Maritima (Sailors and Fir«. 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos') 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



A strike of 300 navvies, mostly 
wheelers, at tlie Glenbrook railway 
deviation works. New South Wales, 
took place recently. 

Knipp's Engineering Works in 
Germany, during 1910 employed 69,- 
000 constant hands. Nine and a 
quarter million marks were spent in 
industrial insurance by the firm. 

Cork cutters and lightermen at 
Alameda, Portugal, are on strike and 
business is paralyzed. Cavalrymen 
are patrolling the streets and many 
persons have been injured. 

At Lille, France, organized labor 
has taken an active part in the 
demonstration against high prices. 
Six thousand metal workers paraded 
the streets raising their voices in pro- 
test against the high cost of living. 

In consequence of the strike in the 
Adelaide (Aus.) liquor trade, the Mel- 
bourne Trades Hall Council has been 
requested by the Adelaide unionists 
to take steps to prevent supplies of 
liquor being sent from Melbourne to 
Adelaide. 

The amended determination of the 
Melbourne (Aus.) Drapers' Wages 
Board fixes 48 hours as the weekly 
limit, the rates of wages being, for 
men over 23 years, 50s. to 58s., and 
for women over that age, 27s. 6d. tc 
30s. 

New South Wales Minister for 
Labor Beeby, in his amending Indus- 
trial bill, proposes to include the 
claims of the Rural Workers' Union, 
which is out for shorter hours and 
better wages in the agricultural in- 
dustry. 

The agitation of the women of 
Brest, France, for cheaper food has 
spread to over forty towns in north- 
ern France and the citizens are now 
supporting the housewives in their 
demands for a reduction in the prices 
of the commodities of life. 

The wool combers of Bradford 
(Eng.) have made a demand for a 
general advance of 5 per cent, in their 
wages, making a minimum 25s. a 
week for night workers. The em- 
ployers have replied that their pa- 
tience is now exhausted. 

The strike situation in Bilbao, 
Spain, is serious and steadily growing 
worse. A state of siege has been 
proclaimed and reinforcements of 5000 
troops are on their way. Business is 
at a standstill, stores are closed and 
the tramway and railways have 
stopped. 

The municipal gas department of 
Manchester, Eng., reports a net profit 
of $700,000 last year. The city council 
has resolved to reduce the price to 
consumers from 55 to 49 cents for 
1000 cubic feet. The gas department 
has paid over to the city fund $226,- 
000 which will reduce taxation by 
one-half. 

The German Metal Workers' Un- 
ion, which has a membership of 500,- 
000, is now declared to be the world's 
greatest labor organization. Since its 
foundation the union has spent £760,- 
000 in fighting employers, and £900,- 
000 on members out of employment. 
Its credit balance at present totals 
£400,000. 

Under an agreement t)etween the 
Engineers and Allied Trades' Socie- 
ties and the Engineers Employers' 
Association of Birmingham and dis- 
trict, the scale of fitters, turners, and 
smiths has been increased from $9.00 
to $9.24 a week, and the scale of the 
patternmakers from $9.48 to $9.73 a 
week. Ten thousand men are affected 
by the increase. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

SAN PEDRO California 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

-♦27 KROINT STRRET SA.N PEDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to Inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEORO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth street 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 
Medicines, Soaps and Toilet Articles 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT 

SAN PEDRO, CAU 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Alex Eduard Malmberg, born 
Malmo, Sweden, 50 years old, tall, 
blond. Mr. Malmberg has been a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific in 1908. 

Torgen Sophus Thomsen, born in 
October, 1886, at Sonderburg, Schles- 
wig-Holstein, Germany, last heard of 
in April, 1907, at Montreal, is inquired 
for by his parents. Address Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 
mere "sponging and pressing" method. '^"^ ^^^ schooner John D. Spreckels 
We Call and Deliver [ '" regard to the seizure of these ves- 

sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
The French Dye WorKS the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 

call on Samuel Pond, First National 
""a^^pe°dro%"al" Bank Building, San Francisco. 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




INFORMATION WANTED. 
Hans Merz, who went to Alaska in 
the spring of 1910 on the schooner 
Ottilie Fjord, and upon return left the 
vessel in Tacoma and has not been 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Will Martin Billington, who was 
employed at Hallverville Cannery last 
summer, communicate at once with 
F. R. Wall, attorney for Otto Schel- 
lin, 324 Merchants' Exchange, San 
Francisco? 

A;idrew Andersen, a native of Twe- 
destrand, Norway, is inquired for. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 



San Pedro Letter Liat. 

Alexandersen, P. Lang. Charles 
Anderssen, Nils A. Larsen, Krlstian 

Alton, John Ludvlksen, A. -1249 
Andersson, O. -1363 Leonard, Henry 

Andersen. C. -907 LIndroth, Gust 

Anderson, Sven H. Lundberg, F. 

Anderson, Axel Ludlow, J. J. 

Anderson, A. Luvlnse, John 

Anderson, Anders Lalne, E. 

Andersen, Axel P. Lunder, BJorn 

Andersen, Hans C. Lerch, Paul 

Anderson, Sam Meyer, IL 

Anderssen. HUdlng Muller, Robert 

Asplund, A. Mellerup. Jens 

Anderson, Chas. MuUer, Chris 

Bergli, Borge Meyer, H. -1792 

Bohnhoff. Harry Martin, John B. 

Bulander, B. B. Miller. Charles 

Bertelsen, Peder Muller, A. 

BJorklund, Eric S. Mattson. A. M. 

Berntsen, Fred Moberg, Karl 

Brusbard, Ewalt Nurmlnen, J. E. 

Beer, Frank G. Nystrom, Ragnar 

Butten. Roswell Nilsen, Edw. 

Berg. B. Nordgren, Chas. 

Berner, Axel Nllson, O. -1060 

Barland, E. Olsen. Gust 

Backlund, John Olsen, W. -753 
Chrlstensen. A. 1325 Olsen, Hans C. 

Carlson. Carl Ong, George W. 

Cordia, P. Olsson. Enock 

Christiansen, G. Planert, Paul 

-1054 Pulklnen, A. 

Draeger, Paul J. Peterson, Carl 

Dean, J. Adolph 

Doyle, W. Peterosn, John 

Davldsen, W. W. Petersen, Lauritz 

Drager, M. Petersen, Julius 

Brickson, Edward Pederson, Olaf 

Engstrom, Richard Peterson, O. 

Eugene, John Pederson, Charles 

Fasholz, Daniel Peterson, W. 

Fischer, W. Qulnn. William 

Fischer, J. -666 Rantman, R. 

Gusek, B. Roed. Leif 

Gravier, Eugene Rajala, Victor 

Gronlund. Oscar Rasmussen, Fred 

Graf, Otto Rustanius, J. 

Gray. Gustaf Raymond, J. 

Herman, Axel Rosental, John 

Hansen, Almar Ries. H. Wm. 

Holmes, Alex. Reuter, C. -476 

Hansen, C. -1910 Runden, Eden 

Hengst. Otto Scott. Ed 

Holm. Carl Sjostrom, Gus 

H.Tnsen. Carl H. Sundberg. F. 

Heltwood, O. S. Siegurd, Justus 

Haggar, Fred. Svensen, Anker 

Hilllg, A. Svensson, N. 

Halvorsen, H. E. Simpson. L. C. 

Hokonsen, John Sorensen, C. -160" 

Huisman, K. Samuelsen, Victor 

Huose. Frank Siman, Paul 

Hansen, Berger Steen, J. C. 

Hogele, Tom Swansen, Martin 

Hoglund, J. A. Snow, W. 

Heltman, Oscar Samuelsen, L. 

Halsten. Axel Smith, J. S. 

Hod. Fred Thorsen. Johannes 

Irwin. Robert Thompson, Stephen 

Indestad, A. Togersen. Peder 

Infoessen, Jon Tollefsen. R. 

Johansen, Ernest Vestad, Thomas 

Johansen. Axel E. Willert. Charley 

Jensen, Johan F. Woywood, August 
Janschewltz, J. 2033 Wettach, A. 

Jensen, J. -1801 Wehde. Fred 
Johnson. Louis, -137 Wrlg, Ferdinand 

Jorgensen. J. W. Wiemer, Paul 

Jones. Harry Westergard, L. 

Johnson. J. A. Williams. Harry 

Jacobson. J. Wallerhouse, J. 

John, Robert Woldhouse, J. 

Johansen, Soren Zorning. Arthur 

.Tohansen, Theodor Photos and Packages 

Johansson, John E. Bergstrom, A. 

Johansson, A. -1874 Grossl, Joe 

Kuhne, W. Huose, Frank 

Kolostow, J. Olsen. A. 

Kalow, Robert PothofT, Harry 

Karlson, Ragnar Petersen. Mike 

Kassama. N. Raustanius, J. 

Krotoschln, H. Samuelsen, Victor 
Kallas, M. 

The following membership books are In 
San Pedro Agency: 

Ahrenlus, Carl H. Fredricksen, Hans 

-821 -529 

Anderson, P. -1720 Graham, Larry M. 

Brlwlk. Askild S. -907 

-1805 Hedenskog, J. A. 

Boylan. C. J. -1219 -1293 

Brown. Charles R. Llndholm. Carl, -454 

-1832 Larsen. Alfred -1606 

Erlckson, C. -281 Pangloten, E. -1404 
Peterson, P. L. -1408 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Axel Osen, a native of Orlandet, 
Throndjem, aged 23, is inquired for 
by his mother. 

Peter Nielsen, from .Aarhus, Den- 
mark, is inquired for by Christ Han- 
sen, 230 W. Thirty-second street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 

The U. S. District Court in New 
Orleans has decided the case of John 
Kauer vs. the SS. Dover in favor of 
the libelant, and the New Orleans 
Agent has collected the money. Any 
one knowing the address of John 
Kauer, please communicate with the 
Sailors' Agent in New Orleans, 
George C. Bodine, 514 Dumaine St. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Captain R. Peterson, of the schooner William 
Bowden, which arrived at Caleta Colosa on Sep- 
tember 1, from the Columbia River, died at sea on 
June 25. 

The Norwegian steamer Thordis has foundered 
oiT the west coast of Kamchatka, according to 
advices received at San Francisco on September 
11. The passengers and crew were saved. 

The Panama Railroad has issued a statement 
showing that the eastward tonnage carried by 
that road during the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1911, has increased since the last report, June 30, 
1910, over 110 per cent. The total is 115.483 
tons. 

Advices from Iquique report the arrival there 
of the overdue Gerfhan bark Magdalene Vinnen 
from Port Talbot. The vessel's rigging was 
damaged as a result of the severe weather she 
encountered. This vessel was formerly the Brit- 
ish bark DunstafFnage. 

The new Japanese turbine liner Shinyo Maru 
arrived at San Francisco on September IS, 
twenty-six days from Nagasaki, fifteen days from 
Yokohama and five days from Honolulu. -She 
carried forty cabin passengers, sixty in the steer- 
age and eighty Asiatics. 

Twenty survivors of the Santa Rosa disaster 
are preparing to bring a joint damage action for 
not less than $100,000 and possibly as high as 
$250,000 against the Pacific Coast Steamship 
Company, on the ground of incompetency on the 
part of Captain Faria. 

A lumber raft containing 6,000,000 feet 
grounded on Peacock Spit, on the Columbia 
River bar, on September 9, and went to pieces. 
The logs are now scattered across the bar and 
far into the ocean and river, a menace to shipping. 
The raft was valued at about $60,000. 

From Conception comes word that the German 
ship Marie has arrived at Talcahuano after hav- 
ing encontered heavy weather. She lost a num- 
ber of sails and sustained great damage to her 
decks. The cargo was undamaged, but a portion 
of it was jettisoned during the storm. 

C. T. Nevin has been appointed master of the 
steamer Sea Witch, vice L. A. Gustafson: George 
A. Dent of the schooner Bertie Minor, vice Wil- 
liam Sandgren; Peter Hansen of the steamer 
Juliette, vice A. B, Coates; W. F. Daniels of the 
Standard Oil schooner barge 95, vice J. E. Pfeil. 

When the steamer Ramona foundered ofif Span- 
ish Island, Alaska, on September 10, she carried 
down with her $180,000 of gold bullion from the 
Treadwell mine, consigned to San Francisco. The 
ship lies in water that is usually smooth, and it is 
thought the treasure will be recovered easily. 

While lying at her wharf at Eureka on Septem- 
ber 9 the steamer Taqua twice almost turned 
turtle, and as a result 50.000 shingles were lost 
overboard, while Gus Ohlgren and O. Johnson, 
seamen, are in a hospital, suffering severe in- 
juries, and other members of the crew were more 
or less hurt. 

The United States Bureau of Lighthouses has 
approved of the recommendation of Commander 
W. A. Moffett, superintendent of the Eighteenth 
district, for two dyke lights of 500 candle-power 
each, one on the dyke opposite Carquinez light 
and the other opposite Commission rock. They 
will be in operation in a month. 

The wooden steamship Ramona of the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company, bound from Skag- 
way for Seattle, went ashore on one of the Span- 
ish Islands, opposite Cape Decision, Alaska, on 
September 10, and is a total loss. The passengers 
and crew were taken ofif by the steamship North- 
western and landed at Seattle. 

The steamer Homer arrived at San Francisco 
on September 8 from the Pribylov Islands, via 
Unalaska, where she discharged her valuable 
cargo into cars, en route to London. The 12,008 
seal pelts brought by the Homer arc the prop- 
erty of the United States Government and will 
be sold in the London market. Thev are valued 
at $500,000. 

The Bureau of Navigation has notified Acling 
Collector W. B. Hamilton, of San l-^ancisco, that 
wooden life floats may be used provided that their 
dimensions shall not be less than four feet in 
length, fourteen inches in breadth, two inches in 



thickness and made of well-seasoned white pine 
or any other wood not exceeding white pine in 
weight per cubic foot. 

The official board that investigated the sinking 
of the little steamer Iroquois of? Sydney, B. C, 
on April 10, with loss of twenty-one lives, re- 
turned a verdict at Victoria on September 14, 
finding Captain A. A. Sears guilty of careless 
handling of the vessel and canceling his certifi- 
cate for life. Engineer Thompson was suspended 
for nine months and Mate Isbister for six months. 

Advices from Melbourne contain details of the 
mishap to the British bark Drummuir, which was 
recently reported at Sydney in distress. During 
the passage of the Drummuir from Algoa Bay to 
Sydney, her foremast was carried away in a heavy 
storm, and, in falling, brought with it the main 
royal mast and gear attached. The deck was 
pierced by the falling wreckage, which had to be 
cut away for the vessel's safety. 

Commander W. A. Mofifet, Superintendent of 
Lighthouse service, reports that a first-class fog 
signal will be established at Point Hueneme in 
the near future. The construction of the build- 
ing for the fog signal machinery will be begun 
within a week, and the signal will be in operation 
in six weeks. This signal will be a six-inch siren 
worked by compressed air and will give four or 
five second blasts every minute during thick 
weather. 

The schooner Fred E. Sanders, which has ar- 
rived on the Sound from Port Barrow, Alaska, 
with a cargo of furs and whalebone, succeeded in 
breaking all records for the Arctic Ocean when 
she reached the most northerly port of Alaska 
on August 1. This is eight days better than 
the best previous record into that port, and will 
probably stand for years to come. A number of 
years ago an American bark reached Point Bar- 
row as early as August 9. 

Three more salmon ships arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on September IS. They were the Star of 
Lapland, which is used as a hospital ship, the 
bark B. P. Cheney and the power schooner Ex- 
pansion. The latter returned in ballast, there 
being no cargo for her in the North. John Del- 
vin, a cannery hand, who came on the Cheney, 
brought with him his 7-year-old son to be edu- 
cated. While in the North several years ago 
Delvin married an Indian woman. 

When the American bark Acme leaves the 
Sound with her cargo of lumber and huge timbers 
for New York and Bath she will not only have 
the largest cargo she has ever carried, but will 
put to sea with the largest lumber cargo taken 
by a sailing vessel from the Coast. When the 
under-dcck cargo was finished it was found that 
the bark already had on board about 23,000 feet 
more lumber than she has ever carried. The 
vessel has more than 2,400,000 feet of lumber 
stowed in her underdeck cargo. 

What is claimed to be the largest cargo of 
canned goods ever shipped from San Francisco 
to the United Kingdom was in the hold of the 
Harrison line steamer Candidate, Captain Rush- 
forth, which sailed on September 13 for London 
and Liverpool. The consignment consisted of 
203,000 cases, 175.000 cases of which are made 
up of various California fruits. The balance con- 
sisted of new season salmon. In addition to this 
the Candidate had shipments of wine, honey and 
lumber, the entire cargo being valued at $750,000. 

The tug Resolute, the first of the Seattle 
whaling vessels to return from the North, ar- 
rived at that port on September 13, and reports 
the present season the most prosperous ever 
known. This year the whalers operated princi- 
nally in Aletak Bay, Marmot Bay. Yakutat Bay 
and off Cape Omaney. Port Armstrong and Ko- 
diak Island, which includes territory that is prac- 
tically virgin for the whalers. Whales were 
found unusually plentiful in Aletak Bay, where 
the steamships sometimes killed as many as eight 
a day. 



SAILORS, READ THIS! 

A company, owning over twenty-one square 
miles of rich, well-watered lands, all free of debt, 
wants you to join them in raising sugar cane 
and cattle. You are guaranteed 6 per cent, in- 
terest and also your share in the big dividends. 
Certificates are $100 each, payable cash, or so 
much every month. 

Here Is Your Chance to Make Money. 

Write for free booklet, Los llorcones Plan(;i- 
tion Co.. 710 Grosse Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. ,'524 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg.. Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AIVIERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON. Mass., I'/jA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND. Me.. 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS ANU "'kTER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 Broad. 

Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 53 St. Anne St. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO. O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
MARINE CITY. Mich., P. O. Box 773. 
PORT HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St. 
HURON, O., Lake Seamen's Union. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 316 Kinzie St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O.. 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. III.. 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 5.=; M.-iiri St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1401 W. Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. 111.. 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA. O., 74 Bridge St. 
'I'OI^EDO. C. 54 Main St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 East Woodbridge St. 
I"!'. HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St 
CDNNICAU'I', O., 1(22 Day St 
ocDKNSntlRC. N. Y., 70 Is.ibelln St. 
N. 'I'ONAWANnA. N. Y.. 152 Main St 
'■.1IFI-;UK)U, Wis.. 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY. Mich.. lO.S Fiftli Ave. 
ERIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
.SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave, 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN F51ANCISC0 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF TTIE PACIFIC 
Established in 1SS7 



WAl/rEK MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL, SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - J2.00 | Six months - - $100 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To Insure a. prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class m.Ttter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street. San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the .lOURNAL. provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .lOURNAI. Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 20. 1911. 



ABOUT OURSELVES. 



The present is.sue of the Joukn.m. begins 
the twenty-fifth year of publication. The 
occasion seems appropriate for a few words 
I)v wa\' of taking bearings. 

In its early youth the Sailors' l^nion of the 
Pacific was very ambitious. Nothing was too 
big to be tackled. Needless to say, the Union 
found itself "up against it" in most instances. 
One advantage, however, remained in all in- 
stances, namely, experience. The accumula- 
tion of experience — the succession of falls, 
as it were — enabled the Union ultimately to 
achieve many objects which, lacking the sj^irit 
of "try. try, try again." might .still be merely 
possibilities of the future. 

One of the biggest of these early projects 
was that of establishing an oflficial journal. 
In those days conception and execution were 
one and the same thing. To think was to act. 
Had the I'nion taken time to tliiiik before 
acting, it is more than likely that the thought 
of "running a paper" would have been dis- 
missed as the one thing altogether beyond 
the po.ssibility of success. 

The first is.sue of the Co.xst Seamen's 
JouRX.M. appeared on November 2, 1887. Of 
course, it was a popular institution at the 
start. Every member of the L^nion made a 
grab for it almost before it was off the press. 
A goodly proportion of the members wrote 
for it. freqiiently in the form of poetry. In- 
deed, the years immediately following the ap- 
pearance of the JouRN.M. may truly be de- 
scribed as the Golden Age of literature among 
the seamen of the Pacific Coast. 

.Almost every schooner numbered among 
her crew a scribe who kept the Coa.st in- 
formed as to the doings on board, the char- 
acter of tiic captain, the peccadilloes of the 
cook, and all other matters of importance. 
Poets were too numerous to mention. The 
pen was mightier than the cant-hook, the 
marlinespike or the ballast-shovel. 

Po]nilarity is ))roverbially a fickle element. 
With the passage of time the popularity of 
the JouK.v.M. waned. That is to say, the ])ro- 
fession of literature sufYerod a decline among 
its former devotees and ornaments. Editors. 



too. came and went. Whether or not these 
two facts are in any way related is a question 
that were worth looking into. Certain it is 
that the falling off in poetical contributions 
is contemporaneous with the passing of Xavier 
Leder, the first editor, himself no mean per- 
former in the higher altitudes. As we look 
back upon the period of twenty years ago we 
are forced to reflect upon the apparent se- 
quence of events having no actual connection. 
I'"or instance, we find that the decrease in the 
num!)er of readers who could hardly wait for 
publication day is very closely proportioned 
to the decrease in the number of poets who 
favored the Joi'KN'.m. with contributions that 
needed init a little fixing up to make them 
shine as veritable gems. 

In time the sensation of novelty gave way 
to a feeling of respect for and confidence in 
the iniblication. The Journal had ceased to 
be a plaything and had become what the more 
far-sighted of its promoters had hoped of it, 
namely, an intelligent and influential factor 
in the affairs of the .seafaring craft. 

Primarily, the purpose of the Journal is 
tiiat of cducaticju. education of the seamen 
and the jniblic upon subjects of mutual in- 
terest. Tiiis purpose has been kept up]:»ermost 
in the minds of those in whose hands it has 
been intrusted during these twenty-four years. 
How far the latter have succeeded in this 
purpose remains for others to say. In any 
event, tlie Journal has never sought popu- 
larity at the sacrifice of the real purpose of 
its existence. 

The JouRN.M. is a seamen's paper, owned, 
edited and controlled absolutely by seamen. 
As such it has .sought to maintain the highest 
po.ssible standard in all that affects the rela- 
tions of the seamen toward other classes. It 
lias kept the craft interests of the seamen well 
to the front upon all occasions. It has recog- 
nized that the seaman has interests in com- 
mon witii his fellows on land, interests that 
lead him to associate himself with this or 
that movement, social or political. The Jour- 
.\.\L, however, has regarded its duty to be 
solely that of an exponent of the seamen's 
interests as seamen. It has therefore avoided 
all "i.sms" and "ists." and confined itself ex- 
clusively to furthering tho.se matters that af- 
fect the seaman in his daily life. At the same 
time, and in keejjing with the same rule, the 
JouRX.M. has kept in close touch with the 
general labor movement, recognizing that in 
tliat movement lies tlie hope of the seamen, 
as of all other crafts, a hope which carries the 
oi)ligation of each craft to assist all other 
crafts. 

The Journal is the oldest seamen's jiaper 
in tlie world and one of the oldest labor papers 
in the I'nited States. l'"rom the doubtful and. 
as some said, absurd venture of twenty-four 
years ago. tliis ])aper has progressed to a posi- 
tion of security among the influential press 
of the country. This position it has gained 
by one means alone, namely, by singleness of 
purj^ose. It has never been above criticism, 
of course ; it has never been as good as it 
might have been ; probably it never will be 
as good as it ought to be. Likewise it has 
never been false to its purpose : it has never 
advcxrated a bad cause : it lias never with- 
held a word from a gcx)d cause. The Jour- 
N'.\i. has never attacked any ])erson or cause 
in malice or without due reflection ; it has 
never spared any man or cause through fear 
of retaliation upon it.self. The Journal is 
as free and. we believe, as strong to-day as 
at any time in its career. It has never pub- 
lished a line for which it has cau.se to blush 



on the score either of lack of caution or of 
lack of fairness. 

The spirit that animates the Journal at 
tlie beginning of its twenty-fifth year is the 
same as that which inspired its birth. The 
J()URN.\L was established as the mouthpiece 
in public places of the great seafaring craft, 
as an instrument which should voice the as- 
pirations of that craft, which should carry the 
message of hope to every heart that beats in 
sympathy with those aspirations, which should 
stand as a beacon to guide and encourage 
the seamen of all nations in their struggle 
for emancii)ation from age-old wrongs. 

In this s])irit we .start out upon another 
year, secure in the confidence and support of 
our friends and assured of success in propor- 
tion to the ju.stice of our cause and the de- 
gree of intelligence and devotion with which 
that cau.se shall be pursued. 



\\( )RK.MEX'S COMPENSATION. 



The pro|)osed Workmen's Compensation 
amendment to the Constitution of California 
seems assured of adoption. Except in certain 
purely selfish quarters, practically no o])posi- 
tion has thus far ari.sen. In the official .state- 
ment on the subject issued by the Secretary 
of State, Senator Roseberry, among other 
tilings says : 

Statistics show tli.Tt from 1894 to 1905 the em- 
ployers of this comitrj' paid to accident insurance 
companies in round numbers about $100.0(X).0C0 
in premiums for accident insurances; 4,^ per cent. 
of this sum was paul out by the various com- 
panies upon compromises and judijnients. and 30 
per cent, of the above sum linally reached the 
injured men. showing that the expenses of this 
system of compensation consumed 70 per cent. 
of the .$100,000,000. while but 30 per cent, of it 
went toward compensation for injuries. It has 
been conservatively estimated that the above sum 
of $100,000,000 would have paid a reasonable com- 
pensation for all the accidents which happened 
durin.? that entire i)eriod in all of the industries 
carrying that insurance; therefore if a less waste- 
ful nietliod of com-,)cnsat'on had been employed 
the injured men would have been reasonably com- 
pensated for their loss and suffering, and the 
employers would not have spent a single cent 
more than they did for industrial accident insu- 
rance. It is safe to say that every employer 
would have far preferred to see this money go 
to their injured men than to tlie insurance com- 
panies. 

The proposed aniendnient seeks to make the 
risk of accidents so certain and definite that the 
employe is always compensated — except in case 
of wilful conduct — and the employer can scien- 
tillcally add the cost of his accidents to the costs 
of production and carry it oil to the consumer 
to be therein- ultimately borne by society. The 
loss by accidents is to be counted the same as 
loss through depreciation of machinery or break- 
ages or insurance against fire, all of which are 
now carried as standard expenses of production 
by every industry. 

The argument in favor of the amendment 

is really unanswerable. Nevertheless the 

friends of the proposition must be on guard 

against the dangers of over-confidence. The 

labor press of the State especially should be 

up and doing in behalf of Amendment No. 32 

(No, 10 on the ballot). 



James G. Maguire is a candidate for Dis- 
trict .Xttorney of .San Francisco, at the pri- 
maries to be held in that city next Tuesday, 
2r)th inst. Judge Maguire is by far the ablest 
man among the candidates for the office in 
c|ue.stion, and he should be nominated and 
elected. We favor the candidacy of Judge 
Maguire, not only u])on the ground of his un- 
(|ucstionablc ability but also upon the ground 
of his s])lcndid personal character, known es- 
pecially to all seamen by reason of his long 
association with, and .services rendered to 
them. The election of Judge Magiiire as 
District Attorney will be a triumph for tiie 
citizcnshi]) of San Francisco. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BAN ON LOG-RAFTS. 



Underwriters, owners and navigators propose 
putting the ban on ocean-going log-rafts, declar- 
ing that unless the practice is discontinued there 
will result sooner or later a serious marine dis- 
aster somewhere between the Columbia River and 
San Diego. The agitation has been brought abput 
by mishaps which have occurred to log-rafts this 
season. 

Out of four rafts the Hammond Lumber Com- 
pany started from Astoria for San Francisco this 
year, two were lost, breaking up and the timbers 
going adrift and ofifcring serious menace to navi- 
gation. Tt is held that good luck is all that has 
saved several of the coasters from probably being 
sent to the bottom of the ocean. 

Three of the four rafts built by the Hammond 
Lumber Company made their escape after being 
taken charge of by ocean tugs, but fortunately one 
of them was picked up before sustaining or doing 
any damage. But the other two, including the 
raft that got away a few days ago from the tug 
Dauntless, make 50 per cent, of the logs being 
sent south in this form by the company a total 
loss. Each of the log-rafts leaving this season 
contained 6,00(i,000 feet, making a total of 48,000,- 
000 feet shipped hy this method. 

The foreg-oing press item is a fair state- 
ment of the danger arising from the log-raft. 
It is to be hoped that the "underwriters, own- 
ers and navigators" will prove as good as 
their word and that they will succeed in "put- 
ting the ban on ocean-going log-rafts." How 
to do it is the question. No better answer to 
this question can be found than that con- 
tained in Sections 15 and 16 of the Seamen's 
bill (H. R. 11372), now pending in Congress. 
For particulars see last week's Journal. A 
pull altogether on the part of those directly 
interested will accomplish the riddance of this 
latest and greatest "danger of the deep." 



EFFECTS OF UNDERMANNING. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



WOMAN AND THE STATE. 



Our correspondent "El Tuerto," in the arti- 
cle, "Woman and Suffrage," published on 
page 11 of this issue, strikes the keynote of 
the situation when he says : "0.stensibly, the 
'votes-for-women' movement is one for the 
abolition of a long-standing and admitted in- 
ju.stice to one-half of mankind. In reality it 
will, if successful, alter the whole aspect of 
our civilization. . . . Only one thing is 
certain, 'votes for women' will eventually 
force a radical re-adjustment of the present 
relations between the sexes — and if I do not 
miss my mark overmuch, women will be the 
first to insist on the new order." 

Stated in other terms, the granting of suf- 
frage to women will free tliem from their 
present status as "property." The proposed 
Woman .Suft'rage amendment to the Consti- 
tution of California is therefore in line with 
the principle of human equality. This prin- 
ciple can never be given a fair test in the af- 
fairs of the world until it is extended to all 
mankind, female as well as male. Compared 
with the importance of this principle, the ques- 
tion as to how the women will vote sinks into 
insignificance. We favor the Woman Suf- 
frage amendment upon the grotmd of princi- 
ple, and we are quite satisfied to leave all other 
grounds to adjustment by time and experience. 



The Journal extends sincere thanks to its 
subscribers an(i advertisers upon the occa- 
.sion of its twenty-fourth anniversary, in the 
hope that these relations tnay continue to be 
as pleasant and profitable in the future as in 
the past. 



Demand the union label of the United Gar- 
ment Workers' Union when buying overalls, 
suits, shirts, etc. To do so is a duty both to 
unionism and to womankind. 



Don't fail to vole for the Workmen's Com- 
pensation amendment. It is No. 10 on the 
ballot. 



ing to take them. But what about the men 
in the other vessels which they may meet 
at sea? They have not contracted to meet 
and keep away from derelicts with a so- 
called crew on board. What about the 
passenger steamers carrying perhaps a 
thousand passengers? They did not agree 
to take any chances to avoid derelicts sent 
out to sea. On the contrary, they are given 
to understand that the Government sends 
out warships or revenue-cutters to blow up 
derelicts and thus clear the ocean. To have 
the United States enact laws which would 
go far to increase the safety of life at sea 
by providing proper crews for vessels, with- 
out at the same time, in so far as it can, 
making those laws applicable to the vessels 
of other nations, would be of very little use 
in the matter of safety and would place the 
American shipowner at a disadvantage in 
the competition. Therefore such laws should 
be made applicable to all vessels coming to 
the United States. 

It is true that existing treaties are against 
such action. But treaties are subject to 
amendment upon one year's notice, and 
there is no good reason why they should not 
be amended. On the contrary, there are 
many very good reasons why they should 
be. As they now read they are encouraging 
unskilled manning of vessels ; they make 
this country the slave-catcher for foreign 
shipowners, they discriminate against Amer- 
ican shipowners, thus helping to prevent 
the upbuilding of an American merchant 
marine. 

You say: "Yes, all this is true, but it is 
not your main purpose. You are, in the 
main, thinking of the improvement that in 
this way is to come to the seamen." Verv 
true, we are thinking of the seamen. But 
are you to oppose these very necessary im- 
provements because they would also benefit 
the seamen? Can you possibly do anything 
to improve the condition without benefit- 
ing the seamen? Would it l)e well to do so 
if you could? Does not the condition of the 
seamen need to be improved? Is it so good 
at present that the people must continue 
to bear the burdens and take all the risks 
for fear some improvement might perchance 
flow to the seamen? 

Surely the mere mention of these things 
is sufficient to dispose of that kind of argu- 
ment. It would improve the seamen's con- 
dition — of that there is no doubt. Very 
likely the seamen would not make them- 
selves the promoters of this legislation if 
it were not so. The seamen suffer under 
existing conditions, therefore we are seek- 
ing to have them altered and improved. 

The condition of the seamen is so bad 
that the white race is leaving the sea. Noth- 
ing but great improvements will stop this 
tendency from the sea. If you want to 
have white seamen, if you want to preserve 
the sea for the white race, then improve- 
ments must come. Andri^w Furusetii. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

New York, N. Y., Sept. 11. 1911. 
.Shippinu' and jjrospccts very good. 

D. R. SASSEN. 
51 South St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

New York, Sept. 7, 1911. 
.Shipi^ing .-ind situation generally fair. 

J.'\MES VIDAL, Secretary. 
17 South St. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 18, 1911. 

Regular meeting came to order at 7:30 p. m., 
E. A. Erickson in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping medium. The Shi])wreck Benefit was 
awarded to thirteen members for loss of clothing 
in wreck of steamer Ramona, at Spanish Island, 
.'Maska, a total amount of $650. 

It was decided to elect five delegates to the 
Sixteenth Annual Convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America, to be held in Balti- 
more, Md., December 5. 

Nominations of delegates will be made at 
Headquarters and Branches on or about October 
2, and balloting for delegates will take olace in 
regular meetings at Headquarters and Branches 
on or about November 6. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretarv. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 11, 1911. 
Shipping medium; material improvements in 
conditions have been gained. 

lOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
165 Cordova St. West. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 11, 1911. 
No meeting: shinping fair. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent, 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 11, 1911. 
Shipping dull; prospects noor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Bex 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 

Port Townsend Agencv. Sept, 11, 1911. 
No meeting: no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent, 
229IX Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agencv, Sept. II, 1911. 
Shipping good; prospects fair. 

lACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 2002. 



Portland, Ore., Agencv, Sept. 11, 1911. 
Shioping and prospects pood. 

D. W. PAUL. Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 11, 1911. 
Shipping slack; nrospects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 11, 1911. 
Shipping medium: prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu -Agency, Sept. 5, 1911. 
Shipping good; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST, 

1 If adqu.-irters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 14, 1911. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping fair. Michael McHale has 
been elected to represent this Union in the Con- 
vention of the California State F"ederation of 
Labor. EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 

Seattle Agency, Sept. 7, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
1003 Western Ave. P. O. Box 1335. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 

San Pedro Agency, Sept. 6, 1911. 
No meeting; few men asliore; prospects un- 
certain. 

P. O. Box 54. ED. BARRY, Agent. 

DIED. 

Harry Dixon, native of Ireland, aged 43, died 
in San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 4, 1911. 

Louis Engelgren, native of Denmark, aged 35, 
drowned from steamer Redondo, in the port of 
San Francisco. Cal., Sept. 17, 1911. 

John M. Johnson, native of Finland, aged 41, 
died in the U. .S. Marine Hospital, San Francisco, 
Cal.. Sept. 18, 1911. 

Hans Maibohm, native of Germanv, aged 24. 
drowned in wreck of schooner Comet, San 
Miguel Island, Cal,, Sept. 5, 1911. 

James Robson, native of England, aged 39, 
drowned from schooner Kona, at sea, February 
13, 1911. 

John Wight, native of Scotland, aged 37, killed 
on board steamer Telephone, in the port of San 
Francisco, Cal., Sept. 18, 1911. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



OIN THE GREAT LAKES, 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*^^* 



'HELLFARE" SHIP NEWS. 



I am indebted to Comrade Henry Fink 
for some authentic notes on the sfrounding 
of the "Hellfare" ship Hulburt W. Smith, 
on the Middle Ground, St. Clair River. The 
Smith ran ap^-round in a fog- during the early 
morning, and stuck fast. The steamer 
George B. Leonard, of the same line, came 
along- and dropped anchor near her. The 
master of the wrecked vessel went aboard 
the Leonard, leaving a "Hellfare" wheels- 
man (?) on watch. He kept no watch, of 
course, and the Leonard dragged her an- 
chor and rammed the Smith, shoving her 
still further on to the shoal, and damaging 
her stern. The Smith will have to be 
lightered. 

So the game goes merrily on. The .scab 
steamer Phillip Minch ran down a pleasure 
launch in the Maumee River on Saturday, 
September 2 at Toledo. Only one man of 
the party of eight aboard the launch es- 
caped with his life. Seven men drowned. 
No lookout could have been kept on the 
]\nnch, as the launch was the thirty-five- 
footer Nemo and a lookout could scarcely 
have failed to see her. 

Meanwhile the scab steamer David Z. 
Norton, of the Richardson fleet, plunked on 
at North Point, near Milwaukee. The Nor- 
ton is hard on the rocks and her No. 1 tank 
is punctured and full of water. The scab 
steamer H. P>. Hawgood was doing her best 
the other day at PuifFalo to crush the tugs 
Conneaut and Cornell, which were lying at 
the dock as she passed. Only the timely 
warning and the sharp work of the crews 
of the tugs saved them from the results of 
bad steering aboard the Hawgood. 

Bad steering, by the way, is something 
of an institution among the "Hellfare" ves- 
sels. Lying at the dock while one is pass- 
ing within a mile is very dangerous to ves- 
sels. At Conneaut, Friday, September 8, 
the scab carferry No. 2 cam.e into port and 
managed to collide with four steamers all 
tied at the dock. She hit the M. A. Brad- 
ley, J. P. Morgan, Pendennis White and 
Jay C. Morse, all in her course from the 
harbor mouth to her dock. Just how much 
damage is done is hard to say, as in this 
place all "Hellfare" damage is carefully sup- 
pressed. 

The season of 1911 has been a stiff one 
for the so-called independent owner who is 
a member of the Lake Carriers' Association, 
and few of the stockholders will escape an 
assessment to help fill out the fixed charges. 
Xo money has been made, and none will be 
made until the Steel Trust has absorbed 
what vessel property it deems worth while. 

W. II. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



Conneaut harbor still leads .^shtabula in 
tJie matter of ore receipts for the year, but 
the latter city is giving the former port a 
hard race. Ashtalnila is also setting a new 
higii water mark in coal shipments. 

The ore receipts at Ashtabula during Au- 
gust amounted to 1.070,.^20 tons, as com- 
pared with 1.238.280 tons at Conneaut, giv- 
ing the latter a lead of 166,751 ons for the 
month. 



"HELLFARE" NEWS. 



The steamer David Z. Norton, wliich was 
ashore at Nortii Point, Lake Michigan, was 
placed in dry-dock at Soiitli Chicago yesterday, 
and it will take about twelve days to make re- 
pairs on her. 

The Norton has thirty-eight damaged plates, 
hnt most of them can be rerolled and put back. 
The repairs will cost something like $20,000. The 
Norton, which w'as bound for Milwaukee with a 
cargo of hard coal, stranded a week ago last 
night. 



Boats Hit by Ferry. 

Conneaut. O., September 8. — The carferry 
Marciuefte & Bessemer No. 2 damaged several 
vessels coining through the harbor channel this 
afternoon. The ferry damaged several plates on 
the steamer M. A. Bradley and also struck the 
freighters J. P. Morgan. Pendennis White and 
the Jay C. Morse. 

Inspectors Take Testimony. 

Detroit, September 8. — Testimony is being 
taken before the United States T>ocaI Inspector 
of Steam Vessels in a trial resulting from charges 
filed against the steamers City of Toledo and 
Chicago by Captain Neil Campbell, master of the 
steamer J. P. Morgan, Jr. 

Captain Catnpbell charges that on the after- 
noon of June 22 last the City of Toledo was 
bound up and the Chicago down, Detroit River, 
in the neighborhood of Grassy Island. lie al- 
leges the City of Topeka sounded a two-blast 
passing signal and that the Chicago replied with 
one blast, that the City of Toledo repeated two 
blasts and the Chicago responded with two when 
the vessels were about a half mile apart. 

Captain Campbell declares neither the City of 
Toledo nor the Chicago replied to the cross sig- 
nal of the other vessel with the alarm signal, 
required by rule 3 of the pilot rules. 

\^'il!iam Gunness. first mate of the City of 
Toledo, and Victor Brown, her wheelsman on 
the date named, testified they do not recall the 
incident. The testimony of officers of the Chi- 
cago probably will be taken at some other port. 

Captain Campbell appears to have had no part 
in the interchange of passing signals beyond be- 
ing an observer. 



Close Call for Tugs. 

Buffalo, September 8. — The big steel freighter 
H. B. Hawgood narrowly averted crushing 
the tugs Conneaut and Cornell, of the Great 
Lakes Towing Compan}''s fleet, in the Buffalo 
harbor near the Wilkeson elevator this after- 
noon. Shouts of persons standing on the wharf 
warned the captains of the tugs of the approach- 
ing <^langer and the tugs were moved just as the 
big vessel swung into the Main street slip. 

The Hawgood was being towed out of the river 
stern first by two tugs. Just as the steamer 
started to swing into the Main street slip, con- 
necting the Buffalo River with the Blackwcll 
Canal, the stern of the vessel swung too far to 
the starboard, striking the tugs. 

In the excitement, Frank Miltner, fireman of 
one of the tugs, fell overboard and was going 
down for the second time when he was rescued 
by Captain F. L. Burns with the aid of a pike- 
pole. 



Held for Forged Checks. 

Frederick C. Rees, 22, formerly wheelstnan 
aboard the steamer Masaba, will have a hearing 
to-day at Lorain on charges growing out of 
the theft of blank checks from the steamer 
Masaba and the subsequent passing of forged 
paper. 

It is said that Rees has confessed that some 
time ago he stole from the captain's room fifty 
blank checks while the vessel was at the .Soo 
and later made out and cashed them realizing 
about $,300. A few weeks ago he injured his 
foot and was taken to Toledo hospital, Toledo, 
O.. where the authorities located him last week. 
He was taken to Lorain Sunday. 

Forged checks were cashed in Lorain, Gary, 
Escanaba, South Chicago. Chicago. Rees came 
from London, England, two and a half years 
;igo since when he has been a wheelsman on the 
steamships on the Great Lakes.. 



Touch and Go. 

The steamer W. H. Gilbert which was in col- 
lision with the steamer City of Genoa, will com- 
plete repairs at Toledo to-day. 

The steamer F. J. Earling hit an obstruction 
ill the Chicago Rixer yesterday and broke her 
wheel. 

The steamer D. 7.. Norton, which was ashore 
at North Point, left Milwaukee for South Chi- 
cago yesterday afternoon. She will be docked 
this morning. 



SONS OF SPARTACUS. 



Sometimes, in those depths in which he so 
often finds himself, the worker is driven to 
wonder if the age-long struggle for indus- 
trial freedom isn't vain after all. Doubtless 
many a weary miner of the Greensburg coal 
field, having fought through one of the most 
stubbornly contested strikes on record, only 
to lose out at the last, is to-day questioning 
the good of it — the sacrifice of money, of 
labor, of life even ; the walking barefoot in 
the snow, the living in rotting tents; all the 
bitter privations of that long fight among 
the Westmoreland hills. To such, who cry 
from the depths. Labor Day is apt to seem 
a mockery. 

But theirs is the narrow outlook. From 
their valley of shadow they can't see beyond 
the confines of their own little field. The 
broader view, the view that takes in all the 
sweep of the present and past of labor, is 
anything but discouraging. Rather, it is in 
the highest degree inspiring. For it carries 
a hope, that amounts to a certainty, that 
labor will yet come to its own. 

Look back at the workers of other days. 
Their history is not easily accessible, for 
the taskmasters have written and colored 
it — are doing it yet in a measure — but if you 
dig deep enough you will find the stories 
you seek. You will find records of hopeless 
uprisings of slaves in ancient times. You 
will find how valiantly Spartacus and his 
freedmen strove against the legions of 
Rome — in perhaps the most desperately con- 
tested labor war in history. You will read 
of the despairing revolt of the Jacquerie of 
France, and of its sanguinary end. All down 
through history, if you look carefuly behind 
the "official" annals, you will come upon 
these dreary tales of labor uprisings, of 
"strikes" that were foredoomed to utter de- 
feat before they began. 

Well, nowadays, there are few strikes that 
are foredoomed to failure. Indeed, most of 
them are successful — speaking in the nar- 
row sense, for in the long run all strikes are 
successful. Even Spartacus, dying valor- 
ously with the remnant of his army, w'as 
more the victor than the Roman who led the 
legions against him. But the average labor 
victory of to-day, unlike that of Spartacus, 
is concrete, the kind of a victory that the 
newspapers — some of them at least — will re- 
cord as such, the kind that historians must 
take into account. 

.\nd therein lies inspiration and hope. 
Standing shoulder to shoulder the workers 
are waging war with the masters of Capital 
and Privilege on pretty even terms. And 
the true story of that war can't be sup- 
pressed and blotted froin history. It is 
being printed in installments every day. 

Thus every recurring Labor Day .shines 
brighter with the sure hope that some day 
tiicre will be genuine industrial freedom 
for those who do the laborious work of the 
world. It won't come right away. It will 
hardly come with a rush when it does come, 
but the trend of things makes it certain 
that this freedom is on the march, and that 
it will eventually sweep the earth. — Cleve- 
land Press. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



LAW FOR CANADIANS. 



Following the raising of the question as 
to what constitutes a violation of the law 
regulating the transportation of American 
passengers by Canadian vessels, the De- 
partment of Commerce and Labor has is- 
sued a circular letter to Collectors of Cus- 
toms explaining the law. A Canadian 
passenger boat plying between a Canadian 
summer resort on Lake Ontario and Char- 
lotte took on a party of excursionists from 
Charlotte for Canada. Weather prevented 
the boat making a landing and the passen- 
gers were returned to Charlotte without 
touching Canadian territory. 

The law reads that no Canadian boat 
may carry passengers between American 
ports or places or on trips which have no 
Canadian stop. It also prohibits the carry- 
ing of passengers from one American port 
to another via a Canadian port. 

The Department interprets the law to 
mean a Canadian boat taking passengers 
at an American port and bringing them 
back on the return trip is violating the law. 
It was the latter interpretation that was 
applied in the Lake Ontario case and under 
which the boat was fined $200 a passenger. 
The fine was eventually reduced to $50 for 
the trip. 

No violation of the law has been re- 
ported at Cleveland. Those Canadian ves- 
sels entering that port are said to complete 
their round trips when they land at Cana- 
dian docks after they leave Cleveland. The 
Canadian vessels that do ply between 
American ports are carriers of package 
freight either shipped from Canada or 
shipped from America to Canada. This 
is international trade and does not conflict 
with the Coastwise law. 



DRYDOCK FOR TORONTO. 



An Order-in-Council has been passed by 
the Dominion Government, granting the 
Poison Iron Works, of Toronto, a three per 
cent, bonus yearly for twenty years on 
$900,000, to be spent in building a new 
steel drydock and repair shop in Toronto 
Harbor. The company has announced that 
all financial arrangements for the project 
had been consummated and operations will 
start immediately. 

The plans and specifications, which have 
been under consideration during the past 
year, indicate that the dock, when com- 
pleted, will be of sufificient capacity to ac- 
commodate the largest boats. The dock 
will be built in three sections, two of 
which, it is expected, will be completed by 
the first of next year and ready to dock 
vessels in the spring. The two sections 
when coiipled will be 400 feet long by 100 
feet wide. The lifting capacity of these 
two sections will be 4500 tons in all, 
capable of handling the largest vessels now 
on Lake Ontario trade. When the third 
section is built, the lifting capacity will 
be increased and the total length of the 
dock will be 600 feet. 



The total ore receipts to date at Cnnncaut 
harbor is 4,111,450 tons while the receipts 
at the Shipyard city total 3,496,247 tons, 
giving Conneaut a lead of 615,203 tons. 

The total ore shipments for the month 
from the ports at the head of the Lakes is 
about 5,500,000 tons, Conneaut harbor get- 
ting about one fifth of all the ore shipped. 



CHANGES IN LIGHTS. 



The Duluth Hydrographic Office reports 
that about September 15, the characteristic 
of the North Point (Milwaukee) light, on 
the western shore of Lake Michigan, will 
be temporarily changed to fixed red, pend- 
ing repairs to the revolving mechanism. The 
regular characteristic will be restored about 
September 25. 

About September 20, a submarine fog 
signal bell will be established in forty feet 
of water about three-fourths of a mile from 
the White Shoal light station, northern end 
of Lake Michigan. During thick or foggy 
weather this bell will sound the number 23 
at regular intervals. Masters of vessels are 
warned not to anchor between the buoy and 
the light and fishermen must not use nets in 
the vicinity. 

About September 15, the characteristic 
of the submarine fog signal on Gray's Reef 
light vessel, northern end of Lake Michigan, 
was changed and from that date the bell will 
sound seven strokes followed by a silent in- 
terval of ten seconds. 



PLANS FOR NEW BOAT. 



H. H. Gildersleeve, manager of the 
Northern Navigation Company, recently 
stated that the new steamship the company 
is soon to let the contract for will be the 
largest passenger boat on the Upper Lakes. 
She is to be 500 feet long and will accom- 
modate 800 first-class passengers. 

The new boat will be a steel null and 
designed much the same as the Hamonic 
and the Huronic, except that the interior 
finishing will be of steel throughout, 
finished as mahogany. Plans are being 
drawn. Mr. Gildersleeve was unable to 
say whether she would be built at Colling- 
wood or at Port Arthur Shipbuilding yards, 
the two towns competing for the honor and 
showing great interest in the outcome. 



THREE LICENSES SUSPENDED. 



The Local Steamboat Inspectors at To- 
ledo, Captain Henry C. McCallum and Wil- 
liam F. Plietz, have suspended the license 
of James S. Hilbert, Cleveland, second- 
officer of the steamer Empire City, for 
fifteen days, and the licenses of George Gil- 
bey, Cleveland, and Eugene Corbin, De- 
troit, master and first officer respectively of 
the tug T. C. Lutz, for thirty days each. 
The charge against Hilbert was careless- 
ness, which caused the stranding of the 
Empire City on Southeast Shoal, Lake Eric, 
on June 8. Gilbey and Corbin were held 
responsible for the stranding of the Lutz 
on Gull Island Shoal, on July 7. 



The Eocene, the second steamer building 
for the Standard Oil Company, was launched 
at the Cleveland yard of the American Ship- 
building Company, September 16. The 
steamer Perfection, which also was built at 
the Cleveland yards, has been in commis- 
sion about a month. The American Ship- 
building Company is Ijuilding four barges 
for the Standard at the Cleveland and Lo- 
rain yards. 



While crossing between Harbor Reach 
and Alpena with a cargo of shingles the 
steamer Joseph Suit recently encountered 
such a sea that 150,000 shingle<: were jetti- 
soned to prevent the boat from foundering. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persua- 
ding seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas Reid, marine fireman, 45 Assump- 
tion street, Detroit, Mich., is inquired for by 
his mother. 



Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Bufifalo, N. Y. 



New flashlights are being erected on the 
ends of the Government breakwater at the 
mouth of Lorain harbor. The lights will 
burn acetylene, and will be red and white 
in color. They will replace the old fash- 
ioned oil lights now in use. 



Demand the union label on all products! 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 
570 West Lake Street, Chicago, Ml. 
Telephone, Franklin 278. 
BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BRIE, Pa 107 E. Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 

HURON, O Lake Seamen's Union 

MARINE CITY, Mich p. O Box 773 

PORT HURON, Mich 517 Water Street 

KINGSTON, Ont Box 96 

HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. M.arquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Esoanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Grp'-;i Bay, Mich. Sheboygan. Wi.'!. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludlngton, Mich. Superior, WI«. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S TOURNAE. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3 ) 



ranged for a joint mass-meeting of all unions 
with members employed in the yard. 

Similar action has been taken by the men 
employed in the Charlestown Xavy '^'ard, 
the Philadelphia Navy Yard, the Water- 
town Arsenal and other Government works. 



What Others Say of Labor. 
The Survey pays labor organizations the 
following compliment : 

Only a small percentage of families whose 
lieacis liold membersliip in labor organizations 
come within the ken of charitable agencies. There 
are several reasons for this. The organized 
worker receives a better wage; therefore he can 
care for his family better than his less fortunate 
brother, and he can lay up something for a rainy 
day. A labor union represents collective ambi- 
tion. The professional man forges ahead, or tries 
to at least, single handed. The mechanic, as a 
rule, can progress only with the other mechanics 
in the same kind of work. He can only rise as 
his fellow workers rise. The very banding to- 
gether of persons in the same trade means fore- 
sight. Tt means that these workers realize indi- 
vidually that they must forego some liberties, 
.give up part of their earnings in order to gain 
more liberty and better earnings in the end. The 
organized worker has not the "what's the use?" 
state of mind. He has certain standards which 
he desires to live up to. He has certain ideals 
for himself and his family. 

There is a wholesome pride connected with 
membership in a labor organization, which leads 
the organized worker away from ordinary relief 
agencies. His union stands ready to help him 
in distress, his help comes as it would from 
brothers, from next of kin. If it becomes neces- 
sary for him to ask for more help when the re- 
sources of his organization have been exhausted, 
he often receives such help from individual mem- 
bers. 

As a matter of fact the labor organization in 
most cases has a strong hold upon the worker 
because it means much to him. He is attached to 
it more than he is to his church, because it 
takes cognizance of his present needs. With tin- 
"Do Tt Now." that we parade everywhere has 
come a "I Live Now." The labor union is here 
to serve that "Now." 



A Disinterested Critic. 
Under the cajnion "Eabor Unions and 
Scientific ATanagcment." the IJoston Com- 
mon characterizes the Taylor system thus: 

Why the lal)or unions are so strongly denoun- 
cing Scientific Management: why, for instance, the 
International Convention of Brass and Silver 
Workers' Unions in Boston last week passed res- 
olutions declaring it to be "the most barbarous 
and oppressive system for driving workers yet in- 
vented by the exploiters of labor." has. never been 
as well stated as in the following paragraph bv 
Geornfe Willis Cooke: 

"The Taylor .system in itself is thoroughly co- 
operative, from first to last. As it is worked out 
by Taylor it is autocratic co-operation, co-opera- 
tion dominated by owners and managers for ends 
of j)rohts. ... It wholly omits the democratic 
element in co-operation; and it bocomcs. as worked 
out by Taylor, predominantly autocratic, dictato- 
rial, feudal, and managerial. It is bureaucratic in 
the highest degree, and is a series of systems 
within systems, of long successions of managers 
and supervisors, while every man works under 
dictation, except the owner at the top." 

The Taylor system at times carries industrial 
paternalism to a laughable extretne. We find, for 
example, in Taylor's book an instance in which 
the application of scientific management increased 
the employer's profit from one worker's output 
from $1 to $3.60; but according to scientific prin- 
ciples, lest the worker grow unrulv and dissipated, 
his wages must not be increased more than from 
$1.1. S to $1.85. 

Mr. Taylor and his associates have done man- 
kind an inestimable service by their discovery. 
But a greater problem is yet to be .solved. How- 
ls scientific management to be made democratic:" 



Heavy Strike Losses. 

Commenting on the losses sustained by 
the railroads in the recent strike in England. 
Reynolds' Newspaper savs : 

Those who were inclined to pooh-pooh the con- 
se<|uenccs of even a partial suspension of work on 
the railways should have their eyes opened by 
last week's traffic returns. .\ more dismal record 
it^ would be hard to conceive. The receipts of the 
North-Western show a shrinkage of 101,(H)0 
pounds, and those of the Great Western one of 
91.000 pounds, while the Midland, the Lancashire 
and Yorkshire, and the Xr>rtli-l':astern, all sus- 
tained losses of about 50,000 pounds each. The 
combined declines in ten important English trade 



lines exceeded 400,000 pounds, representing a 
loss of say half a million of the expansion which 
would have occurred under normal conditions. 
The passenger lines escaped much more lightly, 
the aggregate falling off in the receipts of half a 
dozen companies being only 36.000 pounds. We 
note that even the South-Western, despite the 
boasted '■loyalty" of its staflf, was among the 
sufferers. When they examine last week's traffic 
returns, railway shareholders, we have not the 
least doubt, will thank their stars that even at 
the eleventh hour the representatives of the com- 
panies consented to come down from their high 
horse and meet the men's leaders. 



"Long and Short of It." 

In Haverhill. Mass., two strikes have just 
ended. < >ne of them had proved to be a 
long and hard-fought battle, the other a 
short and easy skirmish. 

Twenty-seven months ago. members of 
the carpenters" union went on strike. The 
employer was obdurate and resorted to 
every method that might tend to discourage 
the strikers. lUit the members of the union 
refused to be coaxed, intimated or discour- 
aged. They finally won and are now jubi- 
lant over their victory. 

Iirawny members of the Horse Shoers" 
Union made a demand for an increased 
wage scale and a summer Saturday after- 
noon half holiday. The employers refused 
to grant the concessions and the men went 
on strike. The weather was hot and a holi- 
day would have been very acceptable, but 
they hardly had time to cool ofif when the 
employers granted the concessions and they 
were called back to work. The strike lasted 
just one hour. 



British Trade-Union Congress. 

The annual meeting of the Trade-l'nion 
Congress was held at Newcastle-Tyne, Eng., 
during the week of September 3, with 554 
delegates present representing 1,667,000 
members. 

( )ne of the princi])al projjositions consid- 
ered is the fusion of the various organiza- 
tions into one grand national federation to 
l)e called the Eabf)r Congress, with the ob- 
ject of furthering the solidarity of labor and 
more speedily introducing improvements in 
the labor world. 

• Messrs. MacEarlane and Tobin were in 
attendance as delegates re])resenting the 
.\nierican Eedcration of Eabor. 

A Tribute To Labor. 

Cjovernor Erancis E. McGovern of Wis- 
consin has exalted views on the value of la- 
bor. He writes : 

Labor is the only true alchemy. The labf)rer 
alone really transmutes base metals into gold by 
giving value to things before found worthless. 
Labor on the farm, in the mines and in the forest 
adds to the sum of raw materials a(lai)ted to man's 
use. Labor in the shoo, factory and mill fits 
products thus wrested from stubborn nature to 
practical ends and the satisfaction of human 
wants. The laborer, therefore, is the real creator 
of wealth; though at times others may be cus- 
todians of it, charged with the duty of using it 
for the preservation of the common good. 



It Goes Just the Same. 

George Gearring I Halt, who lias been in 
the United States eighteen months study- 
ing industrial conditions in behalf of the 
Tariff Reform Party in En.gland, declares 
that while the wages of the American work- 
man are higher than those of his British 
brother, he is no better off than the latter. 
".\t the end of the week," he says, "the 
.American has not a cent more in his pocket 
than tile P.ritish workman." 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATPORM. 

I'ollowing is the F.conomic Platform adopted 
by the .'Xmerican Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms 'of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Ciovern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 165 Cordova St.. West. P. O. 
Box 1.165. 

T A COMA. Wash.. 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St.. P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

EIREKA. Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU. H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



.\ large deposit of quartz containing CO 
per cent of antimony recently was discov- 
ered near the center of Servia. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 1408^4 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND. Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St.. P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



O. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEOROETOW'N. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
I>ORING. Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
rETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wnsh.. 1.112 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA. Ore . P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can lie procured by senmen nt 
any of the above-mentioned plaees: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OP AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WOMAN AND SUFFRAGE. 



The most interesting study of man is 
woman. 'Tis true she's a riddle which none 
of us have been able so far to solve. But, 
like the riddle of the universe, the sheer 
impossibility of its solution has a compelling 
fascination all its own which will effectually 
keep man guessing throughout all eternity. 

Also, "the old order changeth." Woman, 
through the tremendous revolution in in- 
dustrial and resultant economic conditions 
brought about in the last fifty years, to-day 
occupies a position socially which necessi- 
tates the adoption of an altered perspective 
when viewing her status, either as an indi- 
vidual or as the weaker half of humanity. 
The home-life of fifty years ago, in which 
woman was supreme, is now merely a sad 
memory with most of us, like "the pies that 
mother used to make." Hotels and lodging- 
houses by the thousands shelter their quota 
of lonely bachelor maids and old-maidish 
bachelors, and the eternal feminine is chief- 
ly conspicuous for her assiduity in showing 
how comfortably she can get along without 
the prosaic masculine. Unconsciously to 
most of them, men and women have now 
arrived at a stage of social development 
which, for the good of the race, will compel 
them to draw up a new covenant governing 
the relations of the sexes as altered by 
changed economic conditions. 

For these reasons the Suffrage amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the State of Cali- 
fornia, to be voted on next month, has a 
much deeper significance than it has gen- 
erally been accredited with. Ostensibly the 
"votes for women" movement is one for the 
abolition of a long standing and admitted 
injustice to one half of mankind. In reality 
it will, if successful, alter the whole aspect 
of our civilization. In the past the State has 
been bottomed on the family as the unit, 
each family being represented by its male 
head. With women voting as well as men, 
who shall say that the State will not be bot- 
tomed on the individual as the unit, instead 
of, as heretofore, on the family? Personally 
I am of the opinion that it will have that 
effect. Whether that will be a good thing 
for the world or not can not now be demon- 
strated for the very sufficient reason that 
we have ab.solutely no data whatever rela- 
ting to the subject to go on ; and also be- 
cause human nature is such a complex 
mechanism that no one can ever tell for cer- 
tain just how it will work under any given 
circumstances. Only one thing is certain, 
"votes for women" will eventually force a 
radical re-adjustment of the present rela- 
tions between the sexes — and, if I do not 
miss my mark overmuch, women will be the 
first to insist on the new order. 

I cheerfully concede the justice and logic 
of every argument advanced in favor of 
woman suffrage. I even concede the right 
of women to have a say in the making of 
the laws, though they are physically unable 
to enforce them. "There is a reason," said 
a horrid man to me the other day, while 
discussing this point. "Let who will write 
the Nation's laws, so but we may enforce 
them." Rut, and I say it with all due rev- 
erence for their sex. T do not think that 
women are by nature either constitutionally, 
temperamentally, or even intellectually, 
fitted for public life. 

Why do I think so? Because womankind 
itself has .so impressed me. When I walk 
along the street and behold the nightmares 



of form and color which you ladies are 
pleased to call "hats;" the paint and powder 
on your faces ; the pufify sleeves and hideous 
hobble skirts with which you mar your 
lovely forms ; the French heels and that 
mincing gait ; the laughable affectation with 
which you carry your purses in your hands 
instead of stowing them away in your in- 
side pockets — when I note these things I 
say to myself, "Is it possible that these peo- 
ple have brains enough to entitle them to 
share with men the responsibilities of gov- 
ernment?" And invariably the answer 
comes back, "No ; they have not." 

Ladies, if you could only realize the 
amused indulgence with which men view 
your silly fashions in dress, and the con- 
clusions they draw therefrom, you would 
understand why it's so hard to enlist the 
average man in the "votes for women" 
movement. He reasons that your feathers 
and ribbons, your powder and paint, your 
rainbow tinted and weird contraptions in 
the line of clothes, form in themselves a 
tacit admission on your part that you con- 
sider yourselves intellectually inferior to 
men. "For," argues simple-minded man, 
"if you were quite sure in your minds of 
being men's equals mentally you would 
never waste so much time in decorating (?) 
your persons for no other apparent reason 
than to call attention to yourselves. Being 
on a par with men in the matter of mental 
equipment," says he, "and surpassing them 
greatly in personal pulchritude, there would 
surely be no need of all these c'-azy-quilt 
clothes and feathers with which you now seek 
to dazzle and .subjugate us poor devils. 

"Rut, what are the facts?" asks this pro- 
saic-minded chap. "Take up any newspa- 
per you like and read the accounts of func- 
tions where men and women congregate, 
and what do you find? Why, Mr. So-and- 
So said so and so, and that Mrs. or Miss 
So-and-So looked radiant in a stunning 
gown made of imported — etc, etc. Now, 
what does that prove? Just simply that 
what counts in this world about a man is 
what he says and does, and about a woman 
how she looks — O. E. D." 

And — this is in strictest confidence, ladies, 
as I do not want to be assassinated — nine- 
tenths of the men who are now shouting 
themselves hoarse in the cause of "votes for 
women" are, deep down in their hearts, of 
that opinion. Were it not for that mysteri- 
ous sex attraction which makes you look 
lovely to us, no matter what you put on — 
or leave off — and that we men are no wiser 
than we should be, I am very much afraid 
that vour little scheme for getting even 
with us would come to naught. 

As it is I shall go to the poll on October 
10th and vote "Yes" on amendment No 8; 
first, because being a man, there is a soft 
spot in my heart for all women, so that I can 
not refuse them anything within reason ; 
second, because I honestly believe that the 
best way to prove to women how unsuited 
are the functions of public life to their pe- 
culiar mental and physical makeups, is to 
give them the ballot ; third, because I am 
curious to know what they will do with the 
ballot when they get it; and, fourth, because 
f may as well get some little credit for hav- 
ing helped to push along an issue which 
can no more be dodged than death or taxes. 

P. S. — If, haply, some lady reader should 
desire to take the stand in defense of the 
style of feminine apparel at present in 
vogue — especially the "hats" — I shall be 



pleased to hear from her. Far be it from me 
to insist that I am infallible. It may even 
be that my inability to appreciate the al- 
leged beauty of the latest Parisian fashions 
in millinery and skirts is due to a lack et 
"the artistic temperament," and that I ma> 
yet have to hide my diminished head in 
silence before that pulverizing querv • 
"Ain't you sorry you spoke?" 

El Tuerto. 



JUSTICE, NOT CHARITY. 



Objections to a Workmen's Compensation 
law — such a one as is contemplated by the 
Senate Constitutional Amendment No. 32 — 
is that it will put a burden on men who have 
committed no fault. It may even happen 
that they will be called upon to pay damages 
to men who have incurred that injury by 
violating orders. 

Yet every injury that prevents men from 
doing their work involves an expense. And 
it is an expense for which somebody must 
pay. The laws of this country have hither- 
to been founded on a theory that the cost 
should be met by "the party in fault," and 
the law has hitherto taken the ground that 
unless it could be shown otherwise, the one 
at fault was the employe. 

This law assumes that the employes have 
resources from which the cost of an injury 
may be met. This assumption may be true 
in the case of minor accidents calling for a 
lay-off of but a short time. But it is not true 
of any serious accident. The man who has 
his leg cut off has no resources with which 
to meet the financial shock of the loss of 
time and earning capacity. Somebody has 
got to support him, and care for his family. 
Under the present system the cost is put on 
the charity of the community. It should be 
put on the industry that caused his misfor- 
tune. 

The possible injustice to employers has 
been made much of in the discussion of this 
matter. It is pointed out that such Com- 
pensation laws as are proposed would make 
him pay for accidents in which he could be 
in no way at fault. But it is likewise true 
that he must stand the cost of a breakage of 
machinery, which may be wholly without 
his fault. He should provide for the one 
just as he provides for the other, and collect 
the cost out of the sale of his product. 

The cost of breakage, fire, etc., is spread 
over the whole industry by insurance for 
fixed premiums, which are regarded as a 
part of operating cost. The same thing 
should be done with the costs of injury to 
human beings. 

The industry that can not bear the costs 
of its operation is not needed. The Legis- 
lature should be left free to pass whatever 
sort of a Compensation law may prove just. 
The voters should, therefore, grant the au- 
thority provided in the Workmen's Compen- 
sation amendment. — The Examiner, San 
Francisco. 



Canada purchased about 3,500,000 barrels 
of Portland cement in 1908, about 1,000,000 
barrels more than the year before. 



Less than 2 per cent, of Chicago's nearly 
.SOOO fires last year were traced to electric 
vvir^^s or apparatus as causes. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Domestic and Naval. 



The keel of the 27,000-ton United 
States battleship New York, to be 
the Navy's greatest vessel, was laid 
at the New York Navy Yard, on 
September 11. 

Commander Holman, of the Phila- 
delphia schoolship Adams, reports 
from Newport, R. I., that stories of 
mutiny on board the vessel and alleg- 
ing mismanagement are unfounded 
and that the boys are happy, con- 
tented and well fed. 

While drifting helplessly about in a 
heavy sea, with her engines disabled, 
the steamer Allianca sent out calls of 
distress by wireless, and her passen- 
gers, sixty-three in number, were 
taken off by the steamer Oruba on 
September 2. 

The monitor Puritan, which was 
sunk in Hampton Roads several 
months ago by ordnance experiments, 
probably will never again see duty at 
sea. It is proposed to repair her at 
a cost of $100,000 for use as a coast 
defense ship in some Atlantic port. 

Engineers who have studied the 
location of the three Spanish battle- 
ships and two torpedo boats sunk in 
the battle of Santiago de Cuba, in 
1898, are of the opinion that their 
salvage is practicable and would war- 
rant the expense of saving the hulks. 

One of the most violent storms ex- 
perienced in many years struck Chi- 
cago harbor early on September 7 
and lasted until after daylight. Be- 
tween fifteen and twenty launches, 
motor boats and sloops in Chicago 
harbor were wrecked in the storm. 

Professor A. Angot, director of the 
Central Meteorological Bureau of 
France, has informed the Weather 
Bureau that, beginning July IS. 1911, 
wireless messages, giving meteor- 
ological information, will be sent 
broadcast from the Eiffel Tower 
daily. 

The passenger pool of Continental 
and British steamship lines doing 
business at Brazil and Argentina has 
been dissolved. The North German 
Lloyd Company demanded an in- 
crease of its percentage, which was 
rejected. The company thereupon re- 
fused tg continue the arrangement. 

A silk parasol recovered from the 
stomach of a huge shark recently 
caught at T-ewes, Del., by the crew 
of a lightship, has been claimed by 
Miss Laura Dorsey of Saugatuck, 
Conn. She dropped it overboard 
from a Long Island Sound steamer 
early in the summer. 

The stern of the schooner Margaret 
A. May, of Philadelphia, which left 
Charleston on August 23 for Phila- 
delphia, was discovered on Cole's 
Island, near Charleston, on Septem- 
ber 2. No word has been received 
from the crew of seven men and it 
is believed they were lost. 

All the preliminary work for the 
construction of the battleship New 
York at the Brooklyn Navy Yard has 
been finished. Three thousand men 
will be employed. A new record for 
quickness in battleship building is 
lioped for. It is expected the New 
York will be launched within a year. 

The steamship Ligonier, from 
Beverly for Port Arthur, at sea on 
August 30 took off five of the crew 
of the schooner Bessie Wliiting. from 
Jacksonville for Fall River. The cap- 
tain's wife and the cook were stand- 
ing by the schooner, which was in 
bad condition in latitude 31.56 north, 
longitude 79.36 west. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

When in port come up and give us a trial. 
The newest 25-cent house in town. 
New building, new furniture. 
Special attention to mariners. 



FREE BATHS 



Special Weekly 
Rates 



J. H. KLINE, Prop. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY A YOUNQ 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Sodm, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprls* 
I.ag:er Beer. 

318F STREET. EUREKA, GAL. 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 
Mate's and Pilot's License of all 
grades. Ocean, coast and inland 
waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. E. SNELLENBERG, 

Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses. 333 Globe Bldg., First 
Ave. and Madison St., Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



^^i^/>i^^^yN^^h^.^A^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

. At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation In all Its 
Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation In a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor In Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave. SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School. Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



V^^^W^N^WW^V^WWV>^s^S/N^^%rf"^VN/S^N/>,.N^s^N^s 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

SeatUe, Wash. 



K. R. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Seattle, Wagh., Letter List. '^y work is My Best Advertisement 

W. H. MIDDLETON 

TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, Cutter 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In Every 

Garment 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three doors south of James, SEATTLE 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Posiofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 



Andersen, K. E. 
Andersen, J. G. 

-1534 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Boe. E. L. 
Carlson. Jacob 
Carlson. C. E. 
Dahlgren, A. 
Derdio, P. 
Mennett, J. 
Dell, Herman 
Elwood, J. 
Kllison, Chas. 
Ellifson, Otto 
p:isted, J. 
Erikson, A. -1732 
Krikson, O. -606 
Erikson, Fridbjof 
Erikson, Aug. 
Eugene, J. 
Fager, J. 
Farnan, W. L. 
Fellix, P. 
Felix, L. 
Feeley, T. 
Fjelstad, K. M. 
Franzell, A. 
Garbers, G. 
Hansen, C. J. -967 
Hansen. C. -1476 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Haak, C. 
Haga, A. A. 
Hansen, Harald 
Herman, Axel 
Hcnrikson, H. -1773 
Holmstrom. C. A. 
Holm, H. P. 
Iverson. Iver 
Ingebretseh, Olaf 
Jacklin, C. 



.I.icobson, John 
Jensen, H. -1141 
Jensen, John 
Jensen, H. -2014 
Johansen, Ludvig 
Johanson, Olaf K. 
Johan.son, Aug. W. 

-313 
Johanson, O. W. 

-139 
Johnson, John N. 
Johnson, Alf. -1700 
Johnson, Alex. 
Kalning, Jacob 
Karell, J. H. 
Kenny, J. 
Kittelson. C. T. 
Kiesow. P. 
Kirst, H. 
Knappe, Adolf 
Koptze, C. 
Kerwln, W. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kreutz, Karl 
Kroon, Z. 
Larsen, Alfred 
Lathi, J. H. 
Larsen, C. H. 
Lorln, K. 
Lundquist, John 
Olsen, Ernest 
OKsen. O. P. 
Olsen. Bvor 
Olsen, J. II. 
OLsen. Oscar 
Olssen, Frank 
Olsen, Erik 
Ommundsen. T. 
Osterberg. Gust. 
Paul, P. G. 
Peterson, Axel -1223 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies tor shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Halvor Eugene Krogstad, a native 
of Christiania, Norway, is inquired for 
by S. Krogstad, 853 Savier St., Port- 
land, Or. 



Peterson, C. V. -644 Schafer, P. 

Petterson, O. -710 Satto, S. 

Peterson. B. -668 Stor. W. T. 

Reime, T. Suominen, Alex. 

Reinink, H. Swenson, L. G. 

Reinhold, A. Swanson. Gu.s 

lUiunak, H. .'^tor, W. 

Scetvoit, J. Thocke, E . 

Saar, J. Tollefsen, Andrew 

Saiiiuelsen, A. U. Tergersen, Kasper 

-732 Turner, T. 

Scott, Alf. Wilde. H. 

Scarabosio, M. Zechel, W. 

Schultz, Wm. Zwahlen, R. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

Brewed by 
HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER . 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD. Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 

For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

Orj'F KARLSEN. Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "LIttIa 
Beauty," the "Princess" and othar 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street - - Eureka, Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile. Ala. 

Bror Utter, a native of Bornhus, 
Gefle, Sweden, last heard from in 
New York, in 1905, is inquired for by 
his parents. Address, Maskinisten 
Utter, Bornhus, Sweden. 

Jose .^lonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: 

Gust Leyrle, arrived at Philadelphia, 
October 2, 1908, on ship Dirigo. 

Gustav Mattson and Victor Wilson, 
on schooner Charles Davenport. 
March, 1911. 

John McCauley, whose brother 
Cyrus McCauley (late of barge Har- 
risburgh) died in Marine Hospital, 
Philadelphia, on May 17, 1911. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN. WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 
Groceries and Notions 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors* Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. iVI. BENDETSON 

S21 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Ex-cluslve Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen 

Trade with JUKKA SAHLSTEIN. 

New store. Everything is new and sold 
at right prices. 304 South F St., near 
Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen, Wash. 

RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 



GO TO THE 



Union Cigar Store 

For Your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

^^^FR^JK^sim^^^ 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 
around the corner fro^J^UieUnlonOfflce^ 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH i«EATS AND VEGE- 
TABLES. Shipping supplied at lowest 
rates Port Townsend, Wash. 



Cl^[^?X'^gge. Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, PoilToy;/)i?r;l:,JCl5^ 



Waterman S Rati 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Complete stock of Ship Candlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen s Sup- 
plies and Outfits, Etc., Etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 
31B Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Rasmus Christian Sorensen, born 
July 13, 1876, on Birkum Mark, 
Fyen, Denmark. It is claimed that 
Mr. Sorensen may have been drowned 
on this coast about three years ago. 

Carl Victor Norrgrann, alias Smith, 
a native of Finland, born Aug. 24, 
1860, supposed to be on the Pacific 
Coast, is inquired for by his sister. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



^ fStPUBBOi 

Issued by Autnorityof tne Cigar M^Kers' IntetnaUonal Union oi 

Union-made Cigars 

Z\\SS Sntifif;}. IMtlvCltncaitancllnUtli'xnhmtMinaiMbyariGl'CbSSWiriinn 
JllUIKI)OrTH[CKMMMfn'linCIIIUTIOIIU.UNIOHi<A«viu. u aiunizJt« devoted to the ad- 
MnctlmtoftteMOIlAl.MATEIllAlarvilNTmiCnWWllfAKOflhtCRArf. " ' 



t>as« Ciwrt to all snxAen Uimahout U . _ 
' AU MTinqvMflU upon tiu UteJ idJ be punulMd acferdinqlotwi 



Tlitralon we recenittfid 



F«C 
'»• SIMILE 



^ Tie (/li/{Cui4. r^adent, 

'' CMIUtI 



■/. to e m' ea 



VOLUME XXIII 

OF THE 

COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Bound in Cloth and Thoroughly Indexed 



FOR SALE TO MARITIME UNIONS AT 
$2.00 PER VOLUME (Expressage Extra) 



Also a limited number of Volumes XVII to XXII. 
Address : Business Manager, 44-46 East Street, San Francisco, 
California. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH, 

H.T" MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats. Caps, Shoes. Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, BOc. 
Everything Union made. I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 
Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall 2320 N. 30th Street, Old Town 



PORTLAND^R. 

WorKingmen's Store 

Importer and Dealer In 
Fine Custom and Ready-iVlade Clothing 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Clothing, 
Trunks, Valises, Etc. 

ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

23 N. Third Street Near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 



Wanted 

By the United States Bureau of Labor, 
Washington, D. C, the following num- 
bers of the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 
Volumes 1 to 4 
Volume 5, Nos. 2, 20, 22, 27, 30 
Volume 6, Nos. 14, 17, 20, 31, 
45, 46, 48 

Anyone having any of the numbers 
indicated above will please communi- 
cate with the United States Bureau of 
Labor, Washington, D. C. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the address of 
Thos. Symington, age 59, last heard 
from in Seattle, Wash., 1908, will 
please communicate with John Sym- 
ington, 674 West Madison street, 
Chicago, 111. 

MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 



Seattle, Wash. 



Areas, Chas. 
Barbo, M. 
Barnett, H. 
Bergstrom, F. 
Bradley, A. J. 
Bushby, Mr. 
Bonnell, H. 
Brown, F. C. 
Browniee, Tom 
Connolly, Tom 
Chivers, L. 
Engstrom, Swan 
Flores, Augsttne 
Grace. Richard 
Glradelli, A. 
Hanlon, Jack 
Hedger, A. 
Laugan, Jas. 
Law, Willi© 
Lawson, John 
Llseen, Dick 
Mace*, Henry 



Morris, Ernest 
Morgan, H. E. 
Morgan, L. 
Morris, John 
Moyes, Andrew 
Murphy, B. M. 
McCall, Wm. 
O'Farrell, Jas. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Parrott, I. 
Pierce, Claude 
Stacey, Frank 
Stollery, Joe 
Stevens, Jas. 
Stevenson, J. 
Tlllbury, H. 
Tinoco, Joe 
Taylor, W. 
Vanhear, Jas. 
Van Ermen, H. 
Welsh, J. G. 
Watt*, Chaa. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Building, San Francisco, wants for 
the relatives in question, information 
regarding: 

Carl Jensen, born March 13, 1877, 
in Troelstrup, near Haslev, Denmark. 
Mr. Jensen has been a member of the 
Sailors' Union and was in 1907 on 
board the schooner Henry Nelson. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Carl Sofus Frandzen, born in Co- 
penhagen, February 11, 1881. Left 
Denmark in 1901; employed in United 
States Navy, 1902. His father wants 
to get into communication. 

Jesper. Christian Jespersen, who has 
been a member of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific up to 1900. Has been 
employed on various life-saving sta- 
tions on the Pacific Coast and later 
on sailed a scow on the San Fran- 
cisco Bay. His brother in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

George Ulrich Rune, whose ad- 
dress in 1909 was care of Sailors' 
Union Hall, Tacoma, Wash. His 
father in Denmark wants to get in 
communication with him. 

William Ernst Ludvig Hansen, 
called W. E. Hansen, a native of Co- 
penhagen, Denmark. Mr. Hansen was 
in 1907 in the employ of the Alaska 
Packers' Association at Karluk, Alas- 
ka. Since then nothing has been 
heard of him. His sister in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

Victor Gronross, a native of Fin- 
land, aged about 24, is inquired for 
by D. E. Shutts, 1110 Ashbury St., 
San Francisco. 

Jens Peder Lauritz Pedersen, ma- 
rine engineer and fireman, born in 
Dalhy, near Thureby, Denmark, April 
14, 1878, and supposed to have ar- 
rived in San Francisco in the winter 
of 1907-8, is inquired for by the Da- 
nish Consulate, 815 Mills Bldg., San 
Francisco, Cal. 




It is reported at San Salvador that 
martial law has been declared in 
Honduras. 

The output of the Transvaal gold 
mines during August broke all rec- 
ords. The total number of ounces of 
gold mined was 713,407, the value of 
the metal being approximately $14,- 
757,853. 

A great forest fire has done dam- 
age amounting to $2,000,000 in the 
I^andsborg district of Germany. A 
captain of artillery and his horse were 
burned to death while fighting the 
flames. 

The Theater El Dorado at Nice, 
France, collapsed on September 8, 
The bodies of sixteen dead workmen 
have been taken from the debris. 
Five other men have been taken out 
alive, but badly injured. 

M. Helles, a French aviator, com- 
peting for the Michelin cup, on Sep- 
tember 8 beat his own record of 746 
miles in fifteen hours, made on Au- 
gust 26 at Mourmelons, by flying 
776.86 miles. His time was fourteen 
hours and seven minutes. 

Missionaries in the outlying district 
of Szechuen province, China, have 
been ordered by the Viceroy to con- 
centrate in the larger towns in conse- 
quence of the general unrest among 
the natives arising from the Govern- 
ment's railroad policy. 

The French embassador, M. Cam- 
bon, on September 7 received the 
draft of the German counter-proposi- 
tions regarding the Moroccan dispute. 
The counter-proposals, it is believed, 
do not imply the rejection of any of 
the French suggestions, but indicate 
the acceptance of some of them and 
the modification of others. 

A telegram received at Lima, Peru, 
on September 6 from the purser of 
the Chilean steamer Tucapel, which 
was wrecked near Quilca, says thirty- 
two persons were drowned and ninety 
were saved. Those who lost their 
lives were the master of the vessel, 
the first and second officers, twenty 
members of the crew and nine deck 
passengers. 

Governor-General Seyn of Finland 
has forbidden the holding of meet- 
ings to protest against the Russian 
Government's proposed legislation 
cutting oflf the Kivinebe and Nykirka 
parishes from the province of Vi- 
borg and adding them to the province 
of St. Petersburg. The measure has 
aroused the ire of the Finns, as it is 
regarded by them as the first step in 
the partition of Finland. 

A great flood is devastating that 
part of the Chinese Empire which 
extends from Tchang, in the province 
of llupueh, to Shanghai, on the coast, 
a distance of about 700 miles. The 
banks of the Yangtse-Kiang have 
been obliterated, except in the high- 
lands and around the walled cities 
and towns. So far the loss of life can 
only be estimated, but it is believed 
(lint thousands of persons have been 
drowned. 

After a lapse of thirty-six years. 
Captain Matthew Webb's feat of 
swimming the English Channel was 
duplicated on September 6 by Wil- 
liam T. Burgess, a native of York- 
shire, but now a naturalized French- 
man. It was Burgess' sixteenth at- 
tempt, he having first essayed the 
task in 1904. Burgess swam from 
South Foreland to Le Chatelet, a 
little village two miles east of Cape 
Gris Nez, in twenty-two hours and 
thirty-five minutes. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Former United States Senator 
Thomas H. Carter, of Montana, died 
at Washington, D. C, on September 
17, aged 57 years. 

Chicago contractors have ordered 
work rushed on $20,000,000 of new 
buildings to escape a new ordinance 
limiting the height. 

Three hundred and fifteen thousand 
dollars was stolen on September 15 
from the branch of the Bank of Mon- 
treal at New Westminster, B. C. 

Roosevelt's big-game hunt in .Africa 
cost $80,000. three-fifths of which 
was paid by the Smithsonian In- 
stitute and two-fifths by Roosevelt. 

Nine persons were killed and four- 
teen injured in an accident during a 
fifty-mile automobile race at the State 
fair tracks at Syracuse. N. Y., on Sep- 
tember 16. 

The United States Steel Corpora- 
tion announced on September 9 that 
the unfilled tonnage on the books on 
.\ugust 31 was 3.695.985 tons, against 
3,584,085 tons on July 31. 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Premier of 
Canada, will be returned to Parlia- 
ment for Quebec East by acclamation. 
R. Leduc, who was nominated to op- 
pose him, has retired from the field. 

President Taft has rejected the sug- 
gestion of the Department of Agri- 
culture that Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, 
the pure food expert, be dismissed 
from the bureau of chemistry. 

Continued rains throughout Clarke 
County, Wash., have injured the 
prune crop. It is now estimated that 
rain has caused at least 25 per cent, 
of the crop to be lost. The loss is 
estimated at $200,000. 

The best record made at the Mare 
Island (Cal.l wireless station this sea- 
son was made on September 15. when 
the night operator picked up a mes- 
sage from the steamer Persia, 2500 
miles out on the Pacific. 

The greatest pulp and paper mills 
in the world built by American capi- 
tal have just begun operating at 
Powell River on British Columbia 
mainland, ninety miles north of Van- 
couver. The total investment is said 
to reach $10,000,000. 

Judge Smith McPherson. in the 
Federal Court at Des Moines, la., 
dissolved the temporary injunction 
obtained by the express companies of 
Iowa against the State Railroad Com- 
mission, holding that the Commission 
has the right to fix express rates. 

A heavy tonnage of steel building 
orders rolled into the fabricating 
shops and structural mills last week. 
The new contracts placed called for 
40,000 tons of fabricated structural 
shapes, bringing the total tonnage for 
the first half of September close to 
60.000 tons. 

The wheat receipts at Portland. 
Or., in the past week broke all rec- 
ords, namely, 678 cars, or 881.400 
bushels. This is ninety-seven cars of 
\vhe:!t, or 126,100 bushels more than 
the best previous record. Since the 
current cereal year opened. Portland 
has received 2,308,000 bushels of 
wheat. 

Governors of twentj^-four States, 
in session at Springlake, N. J., on 
September 14, voted to unite in pro- 
test to the United States Supreme 
Court against what they consider an 
invasion of States' rights by Federal 
Courts, with reference to the decision 
of Judge Sanborn in the Minnesota 
rate case, which declared uncon-^lifn- 
tional the interstate railroad law. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

l^cilfcis al llie San Kritraisco Sailors' 
Union OftUe are a<lvertis>-<l for three 
niontlis only anil will be lelurned to the 
Post urtice at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these <olumns should at once notify 
v. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
L'nion. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their d'stlnatton. 



Adolfson. G. 

Ahloft, W. 

Albrecht, Emil 

Albertson, Chris 

Albrec-ht, Chas. 

Alendahl, .John 

Alsager, Chr. 

Alto, John 

Amundsen, Albert 

Andersen, Aksel 

Andersen, Otto 

Andersen. Peder 

Andersen, Nils 

Anderson, Fred 

Anderson, E. B. 

Anderson, August 

Baardsen, S. 

Baardsen. T. 

Backlund, John 

Baisieux, M. 

BaUla. .'Ufonse 

Barwa. D. 

Barney, Chas. 

Bauko, H. 

Bauer. Ueinrich 

Baunian. Chas. 

Bausback, £. 

Beach. Fred S. 

Bt-ausang, E. 

Belirend, Fred 

Bcnstson, Carl J. 

Benson, Fred. 

Benson, J. 

Bentzen. Bent 

Berlin, Werner 

Borlin. Nils 

Birnard. S. 

Bjornsen, Conrad 

Cafterty, John 

Cainan, Geo. T. 

farlsen, Martin 

Carlsen, Kasmus 

Carlson, Chas. 

Carlson, F. 

Carlson, Gu3 

Carlson, Mr. 

Carlson, Oscar 

Carlson, T. 

Carlstrom, A. 

Caspersen, Chris 

Causen, Jorgen 

Ceelan, John 

Christenson, Anton 

Dahler. Peter 

Uahler. H. N. 

Daugul, G. 

l-ay, H. E. 

1 eans. Tatf 

De Baere, H. 

Deegan, John 

Denipsey, H. 

Uevis, Oswald 

HL-k. Charles 

Kckart, F. 

Kikert. W. F. 

Kd wards, S. 

Edwards, Walter 

Egeland, O. O. 

Kgelliolf, Fred 

Ekendahl. W. 

Kkstedt, H. 

Eliasen, Chas. 

Eliaseii. Sigurd 

Kllis, \V. W. 

Ellison, Chas. 

Endresen, B. -673 

Engdahl, F. 

Faulkner, Jack 

Feigen, Johan 

Finck, John 

Fisciier. Wilhelm 

Fjeldstad, J. 

Fjelnian, Jonas 

Garvin, F. 

Gent, A. C. 

Georgensen, A. 

Gt-rdes, August 

German. R. B. 
Gibbs. H. D. 

Giesen, Billy 

GifCord, Sidney 

Gilbert. G. 

Gilje, S. 

Gilling. John 

Gjardahl, Soren 
Glase, Gust 
Haagensen, M. 
Habedank, F. 
llabsbon, Jas. 
Hafke, Peter 
Haggar. F. W. 
Hagberg. G. 
Hagen. Louis 
Hakonson, Axel 
Halvorsen, Joh. 
Hana. O. O. 
Hannus, Alex. 
Hansen, Emll 
Hansen, H. -1969 
Hansen. -1969 
Hansen, -2123 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, Nicolai 
Hansen, NiUs 
Hansen, Ole D. 
Hansen, Walter 
Hanson, A. H. 
Hanson, Clias. G. 
Hanson, Hans 
Hanson, H. C 
Harmonson, K. 
Hartung, Hichard 
Haseth, August 
Haug. A. H. 
Haug, H. H. 
Hazel. ^Vni. 
Illig, Gus 
Irwin, Robert 

.lamieson, J. E. 
Jensen, Jolian 
Jensen. Jens P. 
Jensen, -2014 
Jepson, Nels 
Jeppesen. V. 
Jacobs. G. C. 
Jacobsen. Ole 
Juuncey, Jas. 
Jefferson, 'Victor 
Jelman, .T. 
.Jenkins, Fred. 
Jennett, Geo. E. 
.fensen. P. 
Jensen, G. L. 



Anderson. Axel B. 
Anderson, Carl 
Anderson. Martin 
Anderson. Gus. 
Andersson, Karl A. 
Anderson, John 
Andersson, John 
Andreasen. A. -1635 
Andreasen, Hans 
Antell, Fred. 
Antonsen. C. 
Apostolakos, Peter 
App. Gust. L. 
Arnold. E. B. 
Aronsen, Halfdan 
Azini. Giuseppe 
Bjorseth, Knut 
Bjorkholm, G. A. 
Black, B. 
Bladen. Pete 
Blair, Francis 
Blauert. Wni. 
I'.loniQVist. Helge 
Bluinol, W. 
Boers, M. 
Brams, Carl 
Blander, W. 
Biannigan, \Vm 
Brauer, F. 
Braun, Johan D. 
Brelin, Adolf 
Brendell. L. F. 
Bredesen, Johan 
Broders, Hajo 
Brun, Axel -1839 
Bryan, J. 
Burton, Chester 
Burmeister, John 
Cervantes, Louis 
Christiansen, Fred. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Christensen, Olai 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Christophersen, 12S8 
Clalisen, H. 
Clauson, Harry C. 
Classen, Henry 
Cobac, P. 
Corneliusen, M. 
Cox, H. E. 
Craig, E. 
Crangle, Jas. 
Cross, Leander D. 
Diller, Edw. 
Doense, -306 
Dories, H. 
Dosl, Theo. K. 
Doyle, Wm. 
Drager, Otto 
Dreyfeldt, Alb. 
Dum, C. W. 
Duis, -547 
Engstrom, M. R. 
Ennls, K. 
Erdman, B. J. 
Kricksen, Edw. 
Eriksen, K. H. 
Eriksen, Fred 
Eriksen, Gerhard 
Eriekson, C. -333 
Erickson, Paul 
Espersen, Anton 
Ericksen, Erick 
Erickson, Victor 
Erie, Andrew 
Espeland, August 

Flem, Knut 
Folvik, L. C. 
Forde. C. 
Foster, Mr. 
Frandsen, Niels 
Friedland, Carl 
Grabovac, A. 
Graham, L. M 
Gronman, Karl 
Gronholm, W. 
Groth, John 
Guger, August 
GuUiksen, L. Chr. 
(Jundersen, A. -785 
Gundersen, Kristian 
Gundersen, Jolm 
Gustafsen. Gust. 
Gusjaas, Oscar 

Hazzlund, Chas. 
Healy, J. F. 
Hedlund. W. 
Heesche, H. 
Heggstrom, H. 
Heggebo. I. 
Heinig, Joliann 
Heldt. Charles 
Hellisto, Emil 
Helmros, G. 
Heltwood. A. S. 
Hengst. Otto 
Henriksson. -20'-'8 
Hermansen, -1622 
Herman, Axel 
Hermansen. Fritz 
Hesketh. H. B. 
Hillig, Albert 
Hofgaard, Hans 
Hogan. A. 
Hogan, Jim 
Holden, Olaf 
Honor, Charles 
Housler, Otto 
Hubertz, Emil 
Hunt, Thos. 
11 use, Edw. 
Humphrey. W. P. 
Hutchison, Alex. 

Isaacson, Carl 
Iveisen, Fred. 

Jensen, H. 
Johannessen, Edw. 

-1421 
Johannesen, -2116 
Johnson, Ivar 
Johnson, John 
Johnson. J. M. 
Johansen, H. C. 
Johansen. -2021 
Johansen, Chas. 
Johanson, Albert 
Johansnn. -1677 
Johansson, -1856 
.lohnnss -n. ^xel P 
Johanssnn. Ernest O. 



Juliaunessen, Arthur 
.lo..ansson, E. R. 
Joiianssun, K. T. 

-171U 
.luliiisen. Oscar 
Jolinson, John W. 
Johnson, Julius 
Kallas, Aug. 
ivallueig, Arvid 
Kallasnian, K. 
ivane, J. 
Karlsen, -388 
ivarlgren, Gus -644 
Karlberg, Karl Alt. 
Karlsson, Karl J. 
Karsberg, Volmar 
Kaspersen, Christ 
i^ayser, Carl 
Kelly, E. 
Kelly, T. F. 
ivenny, Jas. 
Kerber, Karl 
Kessa, Theo. 
Kielman, Joe 
Kieson, Paul 
Kinsay, Wm. 
Klrstein, J. -166 
Klebingat, F. 
Klungstrom, G. 
Knudsen, Matthias 
tvoch, Harry 
Larsen, Anders 
l-arsen, F. A. -1113 
i^arsen, H. C. M. 
i^iiseii, -1550 
l.«irsen, Chas. E. 
i.aisen, Ingvaru 
Larsen, Chr. S. 
i.aisen, C. E. 
l^arsen, Emil 
i^arsen, H. 
i.arsen, John 
i^arsen, L. -1290 
Larsen, L. -1008 
Larssen, Soren M. 
i^ison, Karl 
Larson, Alax 
Latham, T. H. 
Lauritsen, Hans 
L,arseii, Klaus 
Leighthoft, Chas. 
Leonard, Henry 
Lepsoc, O. A. 
Lersten, J. O. 
Madson, Thorolf 
Magnusson, Gust. 
Magnusson, G. W. 

-114T 
Majun. -1912 
.Vlallenln, Chas. 
Malmin, T. 
Alaniers, Chas. 
Marin, Joe 
iMarkman, H. 
Martin, Howard 
Martinusen, Olaf 
Mason, W. 
Matliiscn, Ludvig 
Mathson, Mauritz 
Mattson, Victor 
Maltsoii, William 
Matson, Johannes 
Mattsson, John A. 
Mattson, J. M. 
McCuU, James 
MiCormick, .1. 
MeUonald. John 
XIcKeating, R. 
.McKenzie, Jas. 
McKenna, Barny 
Nedberg, August 
Neeg, Theodor 
Xtlsen, Ed. -1044 
Nelson, Carl W. 
Nelson, John 
.Nelson, Willi* 
Nielsen, Sivert 
.Vielsen, -1072 
Nilsen, Hendrik 

Oelmich, Harry 
Oistad, H. 
O'Neill, Jas. 
Olson, G. B. 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen, H. -1159 

Olsen, Mandlus 

Olsen, John A. 
Olsen. -700 
Olsen, Billie 

Olsen, Chas. 
Dlsen, Harry 

Olsen, John 
Olsen. Marius 
Olsen. O. 

Palmer, Joseph 

I'aludan, Chas. 

Pearson, J. T. 

Pearson. John S. 

I'earson, S. 

Pedersen, -1392 

Pedersen, Peder 

Pedersen. Laurits 

Pehpik, C. 

Pekman, Ernest 

Peinberton. D. 

Pendville, N. 

Perier, Jno. 

Perlsen. N. 

Persson, Knut 

Peters. Fred. 

Petersen, Aage 

I'etersen, Gerl 

Petersen, H. A. R. 

Petersen, Berthel 

Petersen, N. -1235 

Petersen, Oscar 

Petersen, Geo. 

Petersen, C. L. 

Quinn, Wm. 

Raahange, J. F. 

Ramberg. B. 

Rasmussen, -525 

Rasinusen, -497 

Rasmussen, Emil 

Rasmussen, Oscar 

Rasmussen, S. 'V. 
-980 

Redmond, Mr. 

Reed. W. H. 

Reek, John A. 

Renter, Ernest 

Reutern. Axel 

Saar, F. A. 
Saar, J. A. 
Saarin, John 
Saalman. Joseph 
Sahlit, E. 

Samuelsson. Martin 
Samsing, Carl 
Sander, Robert 
Sanderfeld, Fred 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Sandberg, John 
Sauer, Emil 
Scliober. Otto -2434 
Schager. E. L. 
Schlac'hte, A. 
Sihmidt, Hans 



Johnson, G. Alb. 
Johnson, \V. 
Johnsson, Chas. 
Johnsson, Herman 
Joigensen, A. -1840 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Joseph, Ambrose i 

Koetin, F. I 

Kohne, Ernest 
Koppeisiaa, <J. 
Kopatz, Caas. 
Korsberg, Walter 
Koster, I'aul 
Kinlman, Gunnar 
Kilkeny, M. F. 
1^11 wan, Milton L. 
Kirkwood, Walter 
Kjarsgaard, Hans 
Klover, Geo. 
Kraul, J. 
Kralvik, O. 
Kramer, Fred 
Kratz, R. 
Kreft, Paul 
Kristiansen, K. S. 
Krlstansen, -1355 
Krotchin, H. 
Kruger, Wilhelm 
Kuhlman, Wm. 
Kumlander, E. 
Kvarsell, W. 
Lind, Chas. 
Lind, W. 
Lindberg. Jolm 
Lindblad, C. 
Linder, Chas. 
Lindgren, Clias. 
Lindeman, A. 
Lindebaek, Linart 
Lindkvist, Aug. 
Ljundbelg, H. 
Litalien, Gust. 
Long, Robert 
Lorentzen, J. E. D. 
Loughrey, D. 
Luekinan, E. 
Lude, Thorwald 
Ludewig, E. 
Ludvigsen. A. -1249 
Loughlin, M. J. 
Luhrs, L. -1179 
Luksic, Frank 
Lundiivist, P. E. 

McLaughlin, J. 
McMahon, Jack 
Mehrtens. Herman 
Meidell, John 
Melons. Alex. 
Mennieke, Fritz 
Mersman, A. 
Meskell, Mat. 
Meyer, Otto 
Meyers. Hermann 
Michaelsen, Johannes 
Mikklesen, AU. 
Miller, James 
Mistennan. Paul 
Mitchell, A. 
Moe, John 
Moerman, Gaston 
Moller, Hans 
Moller, L. T. O. 
Montell, Chas. 
Moore, Wm. 
Morris, W. 
Morrison, Donald 
Muller, John 
Muijineck, W. 
Murphy, C. D. 
Nilsen, Ingvald 
Nilsen, Chr. 
Nilsen, Alfonse 
Nilson. A. H. 
Nilsson, C. M. 
Noack, H. 
Nor, Niels -1077 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norris, Edward 
Olsen, Olaf U. 
Olsen, O. E. -991 
Olsen, O. H. 
Olsen, S. -1119 
Olson, Birger 
Olson, C. G. -1101 
Olson, Hans 
Olson. O. H. 
Olson, Victor -1176 
Olson, Wm. 
Opperman. Wm. 
Osborn, Chas. 
Overock, Thos. 
Ozard, 'Wm. 

Pettersen, S. A. 
Peterson, A. 
Peterson, Chas. 
Peterson, Chas. S. 
Peterson, J. -1138 
Peteison, L. 
Peterson, S. H. 
Peterson, Victor 
Petterson, H. A. 
-1154 

Peterson, W. A. 
Peterson, C. G. 
Peterson, Otto 
Peterson, Oscar 
Petterson, Einar 
Petterson, 'Victor 

-1447 
Phillips, Geo. 
Phillips, Max 
Pihpik. Ch. 
Plas, H. 
I'ommer, John 
Priede, Wm. 
Pulkinen, Armas 

Roaldson, F. E. 
Rost. Chas. 
Ross, L. 
Rosenwold, I. 
ReinhoUl, Arvid 
Reinson. Edw. 
Reinhold. Ernst 
Relnink. H 
Rosenthal, J. 
Rudbeig. Chas. 
Rundqvist. O. 
Ryerson, Geo. 



Seversen, C. 
Sexon, Chas. 
Simon, Paul 
Simensen, Andy 
Simpson, Lewis C. 
Sindroth. Erik 
Sjoblom, Karl 
.Sin yard, W. 
Sjolund, Henry. 
Sjostrom, Gus. 
Smith, M. 
Smith, Cleve 
Smith, G. C. 
Smith. Max 
Soime, Rudolph 
Soler, Emanuel 
Sotnmer, J. 
Sonnenberg. J. C. 
Sorger, G. M. E. 
Sorensen. N. M. 
Soto, Santos 
Stangeland, P. 
Tervakalllo, G. A. 
Terras, M. 
Tliiem, E. 
'J'homal, A. 
Thompson, Chas. 
riappa, K. 
Ulbrand, Wm. 

Valeur, Marius 
Van de Laan, D. 
Van Poelyen. P. 
Velure, H. -218 
Venema. Harry 
Verney, A. 

Wahlers, W. 
Walters. A. B. 
Walsh, R. J. 
Wanack, M. 
Wanveich 
Waterloo, T. 
Wattern, G. 
Wapper, John 
Wagner, H. 
Wasch. H. 
V\'estman. A. 
Wetzel, Carl 
Wiberg, John 
Wiekstrom. Axel 
Wiekslrom. Emll 
Young, Peter 
Zalit. Chas. 

Ziepke, F. 



Starr, T. 
Steen, Hilmar 
Stellemark, E. 
Stenbock, Andy 
Stenman. Richard 
Ste])han, M. -1455 
Slolsvik. S. 
Storr, Wm. T. 
Strikman, -1646 
Sube, Harry 
Sullivan, Jerry L. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Svanson. Chas. 
Svendsen, Otto 
Svensson, J. B. 
Swanson, Emil 
Swanson, O. 
Swanson. Ovel 
Swendsen, Otto F. 
Thompson. Peder 
Tillman. Andrew 
Tscheckar, 
Thompson, Ch. 
Thore. B. C. 
Thorsen, Arthur 
Tonnessen, Trygve 

Uppit, W. 

Vilpponen, Edv. 
Vlies, P. V. D. 
Volens, Johan 
V'ongeiir. Ewald 
\'uss, Wm. 
Vucic, 'V. 

Wickman, P. -1022 
Wifstrand, -937 
Wilhelmsen, Hans 
Wilpponen, Edw. 
Willman, -1020 
Willander. Oscar 
Willartz. Fred 
Willman. William 
Wold. Olaf 
Wold, S. 
Work. John 
Wucst. Walter 
Wunstorf. Aug. 
Wysehell, J. 



Zimmerninks, F. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
f If IV Pacific. 

Hannus, Alex. 
Harlinere, C. -1245 
Hogan, L. 
Jolinson. John U. 

-2161 
McIMierson. Peter 
Winblad. M. 



.Vaga, Johan 
Baisieux, M. 
Balda, Alfonso 
iJyrness, L. E. 
Lliason, C. 
Espersen. Anton 
Fasig, Dan 
Gustafson, K. O. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

.\ulto. Aimo l.inilroos, A. V. 

.\ken, Emll Lindroos, A. W. 

.\leksandersen. Halv- Lorentzen, Ernst 
.\ndersen, -1119 Lund, P. 

Andersen, Emll Lundberg, H. 

Andersen, Andrew Lund, Aber 
Andersen, Olaf -1118Lindroth 
Anderson, Chas. Lahrman, T. 

Anderson, Martin Miller, F. W. 

Anderson, SvendMaibohm 

Hugo Muller. R. 

Anderson. John Lundberg, C. 

Vnderson, G. A. S. Mattison, J. M. 



Vnderson. Frank 
Ando, J. G. 
Uaslian. Wm. 
Baxter, W. J. 

Hcnoit, Dewail 
Benson, Charles 
Bergland, A. 
lUanea. F. 
Bleasing. W. 
Bolim. August 



Mattson, J. A. 
Malniberg, Elis 
Mesketh. Robert 
Molher. S. D. 
Morse. H. W. 
Muenster, F. 
Muller 

Moller, S. D. 
Nass, F. M. 
Nelson, Jack 



H.iiiahl. Hans -1746 Nelson, W 



Brander. Wm. 
Buye. Anton _ 
Callow, A. W. 
Carlsen, -699 
Cluistensen, Hans 



-1000. 



Olsen. Carl -965 
Olson, Waldemar 
Olsson, Ernest -966 
Opperman, Wm. 
ONeiU, Frank J. 



Schluter. Paul 
Schmehl, Paul 
Schroeder, Herman 
Schlachte, Alf. 
Scharr. Leon.ard 
Schroeder, Carl 
Schorer, L. F. 
Schroder, Paul 
Schevig, Anton B. 
Schultman. John 
Schutte. Richard 
Scott, Emil G. 
Sederliolm. A. 
Selron, Tom 
Selin. -156.=i 
Semberg, John 



Chresthensen, Harryouchterlong, Fred 

Davis, J. _ . _ 

Ericksen, A. 

ICrickson, A. 

Hvensen, A. A. 

Evensen. Andrew 

Fardig, Wm. 

Flotten. James 

Gilbert. A. 

Hansen, — 

Hansen. J. T. 

Hansen, Jack 

Hanssen, Ernest 

l^ansoii. Henrv 

Hardlaff. Sigurd 

Haul. W. 

Hengst. O. 

Haraldson. John 

Hllig, Gust. 

Haraldson, -874 

llernig, F. 

Heyke, F. 

Heyhe, A. 

livid. Hans 

Hohlstrom, A. 

Holm. Carl 



Paul, Peter 
Pista, T. 
Pettersson. -1065 
Petersen, -1093 
Petersen, Carl 
Perdtes, John 
Pulkkinen, A. 
Penny. W. 
Pnmmer, John 
Petersen, Frank A. 
Peterson, C. E. -903 
Price, Thurman 
Rasehtun. Franz 
Rasmuss, Peter 
Reitter, F. 
Rentern, Axel 
Rasmussen, W. C. 
Kossbeck, Gust 
Rustanius, John 
Sanselber, Paul 
Samuelsen, Ingwald 
.'-'(•hnider, H. 
Sansetter, Paul 
Smith. J. S. 
Svedstrup, E. F. 



Holmstron, Chas. A.Skattel, A. 



Hooley, Alex 
Hubner, H. 



Seidel. Willy 
Sindahl, Jens 



Jenson, John Frank Stange. Fritz 



Johnsson, C. A. 
Joarsen. Carles 
.lohnsson, A. 
Johnson, Hilmer 
Johnson. Chas. 
Johansen, Fritz 
Johanson. Carsten 
John. Robert 
.lohnson. P. T. 
Julian. A. B. 
Karlsson, A. M. 
Kelish, George 
Kielman. .Toe 
Kjarsgaard. Hans 
Klabee, Kawe 
Kliihu, Kave 
Kolkin. F. 
Krauzer. Otto 
Kumlander, Emll 
Lalne, A. W. 
I.aine. A. 'V. 
I.av.«on. Christ. 
I>ehtonen, John 
Lehtonen, Wikter 
' Indgaad, John 
Lindberg, John 
Lundberg, John 



Svendsen, E. 
Svenson. Bernard 
Syvertsen, H. 
Summers, James 
Thomas, Henry 
Thomas, T. S. 
Thomas, F. S. 
'i'hoisen. Otto 
'J'anny, W. 
\'ejoda, P. 
Weehauf, Henry 
Wekblad, Otto 
Wistre. Lars 
Willanen, W. V. 
Wlksten, Arvid 
VVilpanen. N. N. 
Wuest, Walter 
Zornon, Herbert 

PACKAGES 
Julius. P. 
T,ehtlnen. Kaarlo 
MacGoldrick. Jas. 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pollson, Tom 
Uggla, Fred. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building. Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Markets Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



rtie German Savings and Loan Society 



Savings 



(THE GERMAN BANK; Coninisrclal 



(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

casli 1.000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund.... 113,473.47 

Deposits June 30th. 1911 44.567,705.83 

Total Assets 47,173,498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post 
Office, or Express Co.'s. Money Orders, 
or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to U' 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

Ol-FICEKS— I'resident. N. Ohlaniit; 
First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; Sec- 
ond Vice-President and Manager. George 
Tourny; 'Jhird Vice-President. J. W. Van 
Bergen; Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier. William Herrmann; Sec- 
retaiy, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secre- 
taries, G. J. O. Folte and \Vm. 1>. New- 
liouse; Goodfellow. Eells & Orrick, Gen- 
eral Attoineys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, 
Daniel Mever. George 'rouriiy. J W. Van 
Bergen. Ign. Steinliail. I. X. Walter. F. 
rillmann. .Jr.. E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
(Jundfellow. 

illSSlON BRANCH. 2572 Mission Street. 
Iii'tween 21st and 22nd Streets. For re- 
ciipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. Hever, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 
(.,'lement Stieet. between 5th and 6th Ave- 
nues. For receipt and payment of De- 
posits only. W. C. Heyer. Manager. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

♦Ou Rooms. 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
J2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
p„„ry room Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 

4u0 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths. Reading Room. Office open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 
10 EAST STREET 



S. W. Corner Market 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 
Near Third Street 

100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day. $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 

Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

8S0 Mission Street 

Bf>low 0th. near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 1986: Home J-19S* 



„SONNER AV NORGE" 

,,Henrlk Ibsen" Lege No. 7 
San Francisco 
Moter hver Fredagaften Kl 8, 1 Vet- 
erans' Hall. 431 Duboce Ave. 

Medlemskontingent $1: per Maaned: 
Sykebidrag $10: per Uke. 



Union Label 
Goods 

This store is headquarters for Men's 

furnishing goods bearing the UNION 

LABEL. 

Shirts with the UNION LABEL. 

Collars with the UNION LABEL. 

Neckties with the UNION LABEL. 

Suspenders with the UNION LABEL 



Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite 5th 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francuco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

LUNDSTROM HATS 

\re made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

John l.owTcy, a native of Port Ar 
tluir, Texas, was sailing on the Great 
I.akes in 1908, is inquired for by bis 
sister. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal 

Carl Johans Nielsen, native of Nor- 
way, aged 24 years, last heard of in 
1909 at San Francisco, is inquired for 
by S. Thonisen, 709 Coyle street. San 
Francisco. 



DIAMONDS - - WATCHES - - JEWELRY 

ON CREDIT 



763 

MARKET ST. 

Upstairs 




San 

Francisco, 

Cal. 



Send for Handsomely Illustrated Catalogue— FREE 



C. BREINING Special Marine District Representative 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS. CAPS. FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 

ScUi Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 




The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLOTHIER AND FURNISHER 
FOP GENTLEMEN 

Up-to-Date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 
Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths 
of All Iiescrlptions! 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION PIADt 

RED;:SEAL cigar CO., MANUrACTURCRS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



When making inircliascs from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Karl Johan Qlsen, a native of 
Kirkelandet, Kristiansund. Norway, 
black hair, blue eyes, 37 years old, is 
inquired for by Henry Henriksen, No. 
1700, Sailors' Union of the Pacific-. 
San Francisco 

Martin Anderson, who was in the 
schooner Comet at the time of the 
collision with the launch John A., in 
San Francisco Bay, Februtiry 25, 1911, 
is in(|uirc(l for l)y George Wagner, 
1448 Eleventh avenue, San Francisco 



1 


Labor 


Hews. 


1 



I 



In Bartlesville, Okla., the Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners has 
increased the wage scale from $3.60 
to $4.00 a day. The increase was se- 
cured without a strike. 

The agitation among tlic labor ele- 
ments in the Navy Yards and ar- 
senals against the installation of the 
so-called "scientific" management is 
giving the officials mttch concern. 

Stephen K. Smyth was arrested at 
Larimore, N. D., on September 11, on 
suspicion of being one of the men 
wanted in connection with the al- 
leged dynamiting of the Los Angeles 
Times building. 

There was no Labor Day parade 
in Chicago. The members of the un- 
ions decided to dispense with the pa- 
rade and send the money usually 
s])cnt on such deinonstrations to the 
McNamara Defense Fund. 

The Brewery Workers' Union at 
Pcterboro, Ontario, has been success- 
ful in securing an increase in the 
wage scale of $1.C0 a week. It has 
also succeeded in reducing the work- 
ing hours. 

Nearly 25,000 persons engaged in 
the New England textile industry re- 
sumed work on September 11 after 
various periods of idleness. Curtail- 
ment of output will continue for a 
time at some cotton and woolen cen- 
ters. 

riio IntLMiiational Union of Bakery 
and Confectionery Workers, which 
opened its triennial convention at 
Kansas City on September 11, will 
fight the "bread trust," which refuses 
to recognize the union, by going into 
the baking business itself. 

Bakers in Cumberland, Md.. or- 
ganized a ttnion in 1902, Previously 
they worked fifteen hours a day for 
from $5 to $11 ;i week. They now- 
work nine hours a day, enjoy four 
holidays a year, with pay, and re- 
ceive an average scale of $2.28 a day, 
$256.66 a year more than they did in 
1902. 

Sixty girls, eniijloyed by Levy & 
Finkclberg, of New York City, went 
on strike to maintain the union shop, 
when an attempt was made to violate 
union rules in regard to prices, and 
an inlini;ition was given that the shop 
would be run on a non-union basis, 
and in ihree days brought the employ- 
ers 1(1 terms. 

.Members of the .Architectural Iron 
Workers' Union, on strike in New 
York, say the strike will he won soon. 
Tlu' men ;ire on strike for recog- 
niticni of their tmion and an increased 
wage scale. Settlements are being 
secured daily and the officials of the 
imion say the emi)loyers who are still 
standing out will soon be in line. 

Rcinesentativcs of the .Atlantic 
Coast Seamen's Union reported at a 
recent meeting of the Central Feder- 
ated Union of New York that the 
union sho]) is an established institu- 
tion along the river front of that city. 
The New York and Porto Rico 
•Steamshi]) Ccnnpany is the only line 
that has not conccdetl the demands 
of the seamen. 

The strike commiltee of the Inter- 
national Association of Marble 
Workers in New York has sent out 
a statement to the builders and archi- 
tects of that city declaring that the 
present trouble is the result of a 
plan on the part of the Employers' 
Association to induce the unions to 
force all independent employers into 
the employers' association. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Comforting Distraction. — "Why do 
you insist on going about looking for 
somebody to reform?" 

"It helps me to forget my own 
vices." — Washington Star. 



Critical Sense. — "That youngest son 
of Bliggins seems to have the making 
of a true musician in him." 

"Does he sing or play?" 

"No, but he cries piteously when 
Bliggins tries to." — Washington Star. 



A Desirable Heart. — "Mr. Wombat, 
the elderly millionaire, has offered 
me his heart." 

"Take it, girl," advised a friend. 
"His physician tells me its valvular 
action is very bad." — T.ouisville Cour- 
ier-Journal. 



Wise Johnny. — Teacher — Now, 
Johnny, suppose I should borrow 
$100 from your father and should pay 
him $10 a month for ten months, 
how much would I then owe him? 

Johnny — About $3 interest.— Bos- 
ton Transcript. 



Wanted a Permanent One. — Joshua 
was buying a field glass. 

"This one," said the clerk, "is just 
what you want. Its magnifying power 
is twenty-five times." 

"No," Joshua replied, "I want to 
use it oftener than that." — Success 
Magazine. 



Watery. — "There's no use talkin'," 
said Mr. Dustin Stax, "this corpora- 
tion of ours will have to dissolve." 
"How will you go about it?" 
"I don't know. The only way I 
know of to dissolve things is to keep 
putting water into them." — Washing- 
ton Star. 



Plenty of Stability. — .\ Western mi- 
ning prospector was paying his first 
visit to New York. 

"What do you think of it?" asked 
the proud Gothamite as he pointed 
out the skyscrapers. 

"Wal," replied the miner, "it looks 
like a permanent camp, all right" — 
Success Magazine. 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from everyone — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OlA) AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL. 

is under the direct and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 

with all modern appliances to illustrate and 

teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a Icnowl- 
edge of Navigation, and Navigation only. 
Conditions have changed, and the American 
seamen demand a man as a teacher with 
higher attainments than one who has only 
the limited ability of a seaman. The Prin- 
cipal of this School, keeping this always in 
view, studied several years the Maritime 
Law. and Is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of Navigation and Its 
kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, for 
no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of common 
education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the depths of 
Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a comparatively 
short Interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 




THE RELIANCE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Pittsburg, Pa. 

Nothing will solve the problem of how to secure ourselves and 
those dependent upon us toward the uncertainties of an eventful 
future more satisfactory than our policies. 

"They offer a fully paid-up policy to every man disabled for life 
from accident or disease, after payment of the first year's premium." 

CAPT. RUDOLF SCHMEHL. 
Marine Representative on the Pacific Coast 

1000 First National Bank Building .-..-. San Francisco 




Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nautical 
Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observation* 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY 

J. COHEN &. CO. 

Baltimore ClotHin^ Store 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 
have installed a Tailoring Department in their store and are now making 

Suits to Order 

Union Label, Union Tailors 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 



^^^^^^^s^^^^V^^^/^^»^»^>^^^^^>^^^>^^^^^N^^^V>^NA^A/WVSA,A/N^A^V^^VW^^srfN^N/>^>»^^WV%^W>^VS^^ 



9>^^^u7^|wSiinaili of tin c^>- 1(6 

-gSSl^llfnRIWnDNAL - 



uiNiorv 





Eyes Examined Free 



^^ 



Repairing Our Specialty 






Jamta Ji. 3orensen 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 

the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



First Prize at 

State Fair 

Won by 

Hale's "Crescent" 

Sewing Machines 

In past years when we have 
held exhibits of Hale's Sewing 
Machines, they have won 
premiums. This year our 
"Crescent" machines won the 
nighest prize given for sewing 
machines — as the official opin- 
ion held them to be superior to 
all of America's best-known, 
higher-priced makes that were 
represented at the fair. 

These or Any Other Hale 
Machines Can Be Bought 
for 14c a Day. : : : : 




Good gooq^ 

Market and Sixth St«. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 



719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 



C. BREINING 

Representing Marine District 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
/allses. Bags, Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Aut- 
flts a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Nam* 
and Number. 



United States Nautical College 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S.. Principal 
Memb.er of California Teachers' Association. 

Candidates prepared in the shortest possible time for Masters, Mates, 

Pilots and Wireless Operators. 

Government Examinations. 

The Hitchfield system is the easiest and most modern in all branches. 

Do yourself the justice to investigate. 

320 Market Street, San Francisco. Phone Kearny 4686 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



SI 






:.^,^ g-^ ^ 'rVr-'-^-^^^T^^^^^^^^ '^ '-*--'- ^ ^^^:^gg^a£>s^^^^^ 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXV, No. 2. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27. 1911 


Whole No. 2139. 





GOMPERS AT SAN FRANCISCO. 



Samuel Gompers, President of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, delivered the chief 
address at the Labor Day celebration held 
in San Francisco. Following- is the address 
of Mr. Gompers in full : 

Mr. Chairman, Honorable Mayor, Ladies and 
Gentlemen: It is difficult for me to find words to 
express to you the great appreciation I feel for 
the honor done me by the working- people of San 
Francisco and by the very kind words of com- 
mendation of the efforts I have tried to make in 
the interests of my fellow human beings of to- 
day and for the days yet to come, but much as 
I would take tliis praise unto myself, I prefer to 
interpret your welcome and your commendation 
as a tribute to that great movement in which we 
are enlisted and in v^diich we have the honor and 
the courage to fight. 

Insofar as the reasons for my coming to San 
Francisco to participate in your Labor Day dem- 
onstration is concerned, it is not necessary for 
me to dwell upon it. Sufficient for me to know 
that you wanted me here and I wanted to be 
with you. 

When a few years ago, a great catastrophe 
overcame your people, my people, my brothers 
and sisters and the little children of San Fran- 
cisco and vicinity, I was hurt beyond measure 
and beyond description, and when I reached your 
city a few short hours ago, and I saw that out 
of this great calamity you had risen like a Phoeni.x 
from its ashes, more united than ever before, it 
seemed to me that the lessons of all history 
proved aright that it is through effort and strug- 
gle and tribulation that the human family grows 
great and strong. I knew that you had made 
great progress in the rebuilding of your great 
city and to repair much of the losses — those who 
lost their lives, they are beyond recall. But the 
heroism and self-control of the people of San 
Francisco are to their everlasting credit. And 
the courage, the fortitude, and the enterprise 
and the ingenuity, and the industry — no words can 
fittingly pay tribute to such characteristics. I 
expected to see a great rebuilding of your city. 
I had the great privilege of visiting California 
and San Francisco — its great metropolitan city — ■ 
more than twenty years ago, and then about fif- 
teen years ago, and then eight years ago, and 
then a little more than six years ago; and I visit 
to-day, where you have done splendidly. You 
have far surpassed my most sanguine expecta- 
tions. No people could do better under any cir- 
cumstances. Indeed, it is my confident belief 
that it only comes to a few people in any com- 
munity, even those who have labored under such 
tremendous losses, to compare with the wonder- 
ful results you have accomplished in the last few 
years. 

May I say that I am not always displaying gifts 
which are presented to me, and you may think 
it strange that I appear before you this morning 
and afternoon with a great gold medal adorning 
my breast? Well, I do not wear it every day. 
It was presented to me by the working people of 
San Francisco on March 14, 1891 — more than 
twenty years ago — and I feel that I have not the 
right to come here without showing them I have 
it and appreciate it and want them to see it. But, 



it is not medals or presents of any character 
that make the great impression on my mind and 
being. If the men and women of labor manifest 
respect and the thought that I am trying to do 
the best I can in my time and for my fellows, 
that is ample compensation for any man claim- 
ing to be honest. I do not even make that claim. 
I would prefer that others might think so or 
believe so. I believe with Lincoln that a man 
may fool some of the people all the time, and all 
of the people some of the time, but he can not 
fool all of the people all of the time. And, even 
if that were not true, there is one thing from 
which no man can possibly escape; that is, he 
can not escape from himself and his conscience. 

To-day, when I saw your wonderful demonstra- 
tion and parade, saw the earnest men and women 
of labor in line, and saw and heard the great out- 
pourings of enthusiastic acclaim to the cause of 
labor, and heard all along the line of march the 
men and women, and the little children in arms, 
shouting their huzzas for labor and clapping their 
hands — some tiny hands that could only be seen 
and not heard — it gave me courage as it must 
have encouraged every man and woman who wit- 
nessed the demonstration, that must make its 
deepest impress and remain there for all time, 
and bearing in mind the fact that this Labor Day 
celebrates no great victory. It has for its pur- 
pose the domination over no one; it seeks to tear 
down nothing, but proposes to go down deep 
into the abyss of misery and despair, and help up 
the submerged men and women, so they may 
take their places with their fellow workers, real- 
izing their obligations and duties as well as their 
rights. 

This Labor Day is a day not commemorating 
great events — it is dedicated to freedom and hu- 
manity. It is a protest against injustice too long- 
endured; it is a demand for the rights of the 
toilers too long denied. And, my friends, this 
Labor Day with its magnificent demonstration 
this morning, is a counterpart and reflex of that 
which is transpiring throughout the length and 
the breadth of the continent to-day, where we 
can see the toilers of America keeping time in 
the march of labor. 

On the way to this meeting I saw a statement 
published in a newspaper saying that in Los An- 
.geles this morning more than 25,000 organized 
workers participated in the Labor Day parade. 
And what has occurred here? It appeared to 
me that fully between 45,000 and 50,000 marched 
in the parade to-day, conservatively stated, or 
perhaps undcrstnted. Your evening papers state 
the figures at 30,000 or 35,000. It is fair to assume 
that the- Associated Press wires giving 25.000 in 
the parade in Los Angeles in no way indicates 
the true number there. 

And, my friends, this Labor Day in America 
was not given to us (any more than anything 
else in the cause of labor was given to us), on ;i 
silver platter, but it was wrung from the unwill- 
ing employers. We just took it. 

This Labor Day in An-ierica is the outward ex- 
pression of discontent of the masses of the work- 
ers of our continent — discontent and unrest which 
is clearly manifested the civilized world over. 

This morning as we began our parade, at about 
the same time in the city of Newcastle-on-Tyne, 
there assembled the representatives of the or- 
ganized working people of Great Britain. In ad- 



dition to the British Trade Union Congress, there 
convened a few days ago in Budapest, Hun- 
gary, the representatives of the organized labor 
movement in the International Congress of La- 
bor, and in which we were represented by that 
sturdy trade unionist, James Duncan. This is a 
manifestation of unrest — national and internation- 
al — this spirit of unrest, this spirit of discontent, 
this spirit of protest, this spirit of demand upon 
modern society that we shall be regarded no 
longer as simply wealth-producing machines, but 
as having done and doing such great services to 
humanity we may be treated in our rights as men 
and women, made cold by the same winter's blast, 
and made warm by the same summer's sun, with 
our hopes and aspirations and love not confined 
in one channel, but to all humanity. 

We hear of combinations or associations of 
some employers of labor who would crush out 
this labor movement of ours, or if not crushing 
it out actually, then to draw its teeth so it cannot 
bite and hurt. A movement of the people which 
can not make its protest heard and felt will soon 
decay and die from inanition. 

We do not struggle and contest — we try to 
avoid it as best we can — but we say to all the 
enemies of organized labor: Stand away, clear the 
path, for the men and women in the organized 
labor movement of our time are determined that 
the people shall attain their right and that they 
shall be free! 

If there lurks still in the minds of hostile em- 
ployers and their associations, with their lawyers 
and their judges, the idea that they can either 
kill or enfeeble the labor movement, they ought 
to witness the demonstration to-day here, and to 
learn of the demonstrations elsewhere, and ask 
themselves whether it is possible to crush a 
n-iovement of men and women which has had 
such an awakening and development away from 
the old paths of misery and despair. No longer 
is labor to be typified as a man with a bent back 
and receding forehead, like the "Man With the 
Hoe." The men and women of labor in America 
stand erect, looking the whole world in the face, 
with the right and determiiiation to as])irc and to 
ac(|uire the best which can ho attained by the 
human race. 

I had a big speech in my mind to deliver to you 
to-day, and I have my pockets fidl of notes, which 
I propose to keep there. In this great amphi- 
theatre, this great sea of exjiectant faces, with 
the .sun shining down in my eyes and on my head, 
and the beautiful air driving the words half way 
down my throat before they are uttered, a great 
big speech is not in order. Bttt there are some 
things that must find expression. 

I referred to the unrest and the hope among 
the toilers and also the hope which exists among 
some employers to crush out the organizations of 
protest. They have done that everywhere, they 
have had an opportunity. They did it in the past 
and are doing it now. And, bear in mind, my 
friends, that ours is not the first republic of the 
world — others existed long before our time, and 
they had wealth and culture and art antl music, 
but they decayed and passed away. The wealth 
possessors desired greater power. They first got 
some kind of a judge who clothed these illegal 
desires in the form of law. There has never been 
a tyraTit on the globe who wanted to exercise a 
wrong over the peoi)lc but who found a judge 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



tn clntlie tyranny in the form of the law. My 
friends, in the republic of Rome, those in power 
took unto lliemselvcs titles and lands, privileRcs 
and charters and immunities, and tlien proceeded 
to take away from the people the right of free 
assemblage and of protest, and then, we are told, 
the republic was overawed and stricken down by 
a small band of barbarians. The truth of it is. 
tlie masses of the people no longer had civic 
pride, love of country, patriotism — they might as 
well have the tyrant from without as the tyrant 
from within. The republic of Rome was rotten 
at the core before it fell the victim of the small 
band of marauders. My friends, I ask you, are 
we going to forget the lesson that this teaches 
us? 

In the United States, is there no evidence of 
taking title to land and franchises and privi- 
leges, and is there not a judiciary ever ready to 
interpret the right to grant and to receive these 
privileges and franchises? 

Our millionaires purchase for their daughters — 
their beautiful and pure daughters — the titles of 
nobility, each title carrying with it a decrepit 
prince, a count, a duke or a "duck." If these men 
are willing to pay millions for a title and a for- 
eign title-holder, it is not a great problem to 
guess how much would they pay to possess such 
titles themselves. 

If men can be sent to prison for seeking to pro- 
tect and promote the interests of the mass of 
workers; if men dare not protest against the trusts 
and corporations; if under an injunction men can 
be denied the riglit to express themselves on mat- 
ters affecting and determining a presidential elec- 
tion; if they can he enjoined in advance from so 
doing, then I say to you, my friends, the exact 
conditions exist in this country to-day as existed 
in Rome before the fall of that republic. But 
they have a different people to deal with in 1911 
than they had in the republic of Rome. They 
have a different people confronting them. VVe 
have not lost courage, we have not lost faith; we 
are optimists; we believe in ourselves and in our 
fellow-men and women, and in spite of all hostile 
legislation, in spite of all contemptible interpreta- 
tion of the laws, and of injunctions invading the 
rights of the people, we propose to maintain the 
labor movement, the movement of protest and 
uplift of the working people. 

In Connecticut, the hatters; in New Orleans, 
25 of the workers in the ship and dock-working 
industry or vocation; in Virginia, a few dozen 
farmers were sent to prison for various terms, 
all under the provisions of the Sherman Anti- 
Trust law, and all because they proposed to pro- 
tect their lives and the only other thing they pos 
sess, their power of labor. 

Under injunctions, because Frank Morrison, 
John Mitchell and I dared, dared, dared to speak 
in behalf of labor, we were sentenced to prison. 
The Supreme Court, after two years of appeal, 
decided the judge did not go the right way about 
it, and reversed the sentence and said he could go 
about it in the right way. And he has already 
gone about it in what he regards as the right wa}', 
and I do not know how soon a message may be 
coming inviting me to be in durance vile. Well, 
suppose it should occur, what of it, what of it, 
v\'hat of it! If they convict such men as Mitchell 
and Morrison, there will not be much distinction 
in the minds of the people as to what, in the 
minds of the courts, constitutes criminality. And 
does anyone imagine that it would be possible 
by incarcerating us in jail, that our voices would 
be stifled? Perhaps we may not be able to speak 
or write, but out of the three voices thus silenced 
will come millions of voices of protest. 

The Government of the United States, like 
every government of the world, has, during a 
period of war, the right to declare martial law, 
and during a period of war it can set aside the 
guarantees of the Constitution, the right of free 
speech and free press, if those in the charge of 
military operations believe the exercise of such 
is dangerous to the life of the country. But as 
soon as the danger is over, martial law ceases, 
and the constitutional rights restored. That is 
when the life of the nation is at stake. But in 
the case of a hat or a stove, depriving the right 
of free speech and free press, it is not obtained 
for a week or a month, but forever and ever and 
anon. What is done for the protection for a hat 
or a stove is not resorted to to save the nation. 

I would not have any one believe I favor li- 
cense in any way by spoken or printed words. I 
believe in the strict accountability of every utter- 
ance made, but I hold free speech and free press 
means the right to speak and to write and then 
taking the consequences for what you say. But 
I deny the right of any court to decree in advance 
that I shall not say thus and so, that I shall be 
restrained from expressing my judgment upon 
any question of interest to the people. Indeed, 
such an injunction and invasion of human rights 
can only come into action when free speech and 
free press are dead. 

The right of free speech and free press were 
not given to us so we might sing the praises of 
the powers that be. It is not necessary to be con- 
stitutionally protected in order to assert our 
right to sing "My Country, 'Tis of Thee." We 
do not need any constitutional right for that. It 
was placed there for a purpose — to oppose 
tyranny and corruption; to criticize those who 
are in power for the time being; the right to say 
unpleasant things to the powers that be, and I 
suppose you have noticed that at least the in- 



junction has not prevented me absolutely from 
the exercise of free speech or free press. 

I am afraid I am making a big speech, or a 
long one. 

.Men! In this effort made by the enemies of 
labor to attack the organization of labor, many 
things are done. The worst expression of it has 
occurred in the last few years. A few years ago 
the authorities went into Colorado and stole three 
men, and charged them with a grave crime. 
Moyer, Haywood and Pettibone w^ere stolen and 
taken into Idaho, and when the trial came they 
were acquitted. 

A few months ago a great calamity occurred 
in the City of the Angels. I am not using the 
term in a spirit of levity, because that which the 
great catastrophe produced shocked all of us, and 
our hearts went out in sympathy and in condo- 
lence, not only for the poor men and women 
whose lives had been crushed out, not only for 
the property which had been destroyed, but for 
the families and the people of the community. 
We felt deeply horrified at the great loss. But, 
my friends, the news had scarcely been flashed 
tlirough the world than the enemies of labor in 
■'ill the country set up a chorus, inharmonious and 
discordant, in proclaiming that labor and the or- 
ganizations of labor were responsible for it. My 
friends, a few weeks ago we were again shocked. 
.'K man by the name of Detective Burns and an- 
other police officer by the name of Ilossick went 
into Indianapolis, into the office of the Bridge 
and Structural Ironworkers, whose officers were 
in session in the city of Indianapolis, and there 
lured out of the room of his colleagues, John J. 
McNamara, Secretary of the Bridge and Struc- 
tural Ironworkers. He was lured away without 
the opportunity of consulting his family or 
friend> or even an attorney, or without going be- 
fore a proper court to prove that he had a right 
to the protection of the State. He was hand- 
miffed in irons and dragged across the continent 
thousands of miles away from his family, and 
taken to Los Angeles and there placed in jail, 
charged with the commission of a grave crime. 
M_v friends, you may know that Burns has said 
he has the evidence of John J. McNamara's guilt, 
and also that of J. B.'s; but I ask you, my friends, 
is the course he pursued consistent with the be- 
lief that he has convincing evidence against the 
McNamaras? If he had, would he have at- 
tempted to steal these men bodily from their 
homes without giving them the opportunity to 
be heard before being taken away? Is it not a 
fair presmnption, that if he had the evidence, he 
would have given them a chance to protect the 
rights they had? You know. Burns has said pub- 
licly that detectives, as a rule, are the greatest 
scoundrels that have gone unwhipped by justice, 
and the detectives so characterized say to Burns, 
"You are another." We know J. J. McNamara. 
We know him as an intelligent, serious and think- 
ing man, full of human sympathy and kindness. 

We know, as men of labor, that our movement 
cannot succeed on lawlessness and crime, and 
we do not need it in order to succeed. We are 
not only going to continue to believe that the 
McNamaras are innocent of the crime charged 
against them until at least a jury has decided 
otherwise, but we propose to continue to do 
everything in our power to see that they are 
amply and properly defended when the day of 
trial comes. .\nd not only that — we are tired 
of this procedure of man-stealing. They do not 
steal Rockefeller; they do not steal the Astors 
or the Vanderbilts. But they do not mind (when 
the notion takes possession of them) stealing 
the men of labor. We are not alone going to 
defend these men, but we are going to make it 
impossible for the recurrence of this man-steal- 
ing practice in the future, and we have made up 
our minds to prosecute these kidnapers. But, 
my friends, I want to call your attention to two 
diflferences in procedure. Detective Burns was in- 
dicted with Hossick by a grand jury in Marion 
County, Indiana. The foreman of the grand jury 
was the secretary of David M. Parry, the former 
president of the National Manufacturers; so I 
think that fact in itself dispels the thought that 
we had any influence with that Grand Jury which 
returned the indictment. Burns gave bonds for 
his appearance, and Hossick was in Los .A^ngeles, 
and the Governor of Indiana appointed an attor- 
ney and law officer to proceed to Los Angeles 
and argue the case. My friends, there was ample 
opportunity afforded Hossick and others before 
the Governor of California to present his side 
before the Governor decided whether he should 
or should not honor the requisition issued by the 
Governor of Indiana, and the Governor of Cali- 
fornia decided that Ilossick should be returned 
to Indiana and answer the charge. But the Gov- 
ernor for the course which he has pursued; he 
said to Hossick that this extradition shall not be 
effective for several days until Hossick shall have 
had an opportunity to show before the courts of 
California that he should or should not be taken 
from this State to Indiana. We would not have 
any other course. Our attorneys did not urge 
any other course. It was Hossick's right, and we 
say, fair and right was the course of your Gov- 
ernor. But we urge this thought upon you also, 
that if it was right for Hossick to defend his 
rights against extradition, it was no less the right 
of the McNamara brothers. We have this fight 
to make and we are not going to run from it. 

I am not accustomed to enter into the local 
aflfairs of any community, when it is at all pos- 
sible for me to avoid it. T mean to say this, that 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



NEW COMPENSATION LAW. 



Detailed inforniation ha.s just l)een re- 
ceived at the headquarters of the American 
Federation of Labor relative to the Em- 
ployes' Compensation law, recently passed 
In' the State Legislature of Washin^^^ton. 
Tlie new law covers the subject in the most 
comprehensive manner. 

A tax is to be levied upon all employers 
of labor ranging from .020 to AOO per cent 
per year upon the amount of the average 
pay-roll according to class. Industry is 
divided into various classes, forty-seven in 
number. A death benefit of $75 is pro- 
vided for, and in addition monthly pay- 
ments are to be made to the widow during 
widowhood and $5 per month for each child 
under the age of 16 at the occurrence of the 
injury until such ciiild shall have r.eached 
16, but total payments shall not exceed $3.S 
per month. Upon marriage of widow a 
lump sum equal to twelve times her 
monthly allowance, $240 shall be paid her, 
but the pay for children under 16 shall be 
continued as above. The law relating to 
permanent disability or death reads as fol- 
lows : 

"For every case of injury resulting in 
death or permanent total disability it shall 
be the duty of the department to forthwith 
notify the State Treasurer, and he shall set 
apart out of the accident fund a sum of 
money for the case, to be known as the 
estimated lump value of the monthly pay- 
ments provided for it, to be calculated upon 
the theory that a monthly payment of $20 
to a person 30 years of age is equal to a 
lump sum payment according to the expect- 
ancy of life as fixed by the American Mor- 
tality table of $4000, but the total in no case to 
exceed the sum of $4000." 

The sum thus arrived at will be placed at 
interest to provide the monthly payments 
given above. 



FIGHT FOR RECOGNITION. 



Representatives of the Federation of Shop 
Employes are seeking to avert trouble on 
the Harriman lines. The members of the 
unions that compose the Federation are de- 
termined to secure recognition and are pre- 
pared to strike if the officials of the railroad 
.system refuse to enter into negotiations 
with their representatives. A strike canvass 
has been made and the determination of 
the men to fight is emphasized by their 
almost unanimous decision to strike unless 
immediate attention be given their de- 
mands. 

The railroad officials have met repre- 
sentatives of the individual unions in the 
past and have declared their willingness to 
do so in the future. They are loath, how- 
ever, to do business with the Federation. 
The men, on the other hand, are determined 
that the railroad officials shall recognize the 
Federation and do business with its repre- 
sentatives. They ask that the railroad com- 
pany shall enter into agreements with all 
shop crafts on the same day and that all 
agreements shall terminate on the same 
day. Demands for shorter hours and higher 
wages will be made when the time for 
signing the scale of the Federation arrives. 



Queensland's death rate of 9.56 per 1000 
population is said to be the lowest of any 
country in the world. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



McNAMARA DEFENSE FUND. 



ALL TRADE-UNIONS, INDIVIDUAL 
TRADE-UNIONISTS AND THE PUB- 
LIC AT LARGE ARE URGED BY THE 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE McNA- 
MARA DEFENSE FUND. CONTRIBU- 
TIONS MAY BE SENT TO THE OF- 
FICE OF THE COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL OR TO FRANK MORRISON, 
SECRETARY, AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR, 801-809 G ST., N. W., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



More About the Courts. 

Under the caption "The Alternative to 
Popular Control of the Judiciary" the Bos- 
ton Common says : 

Democracy is either a figure of speech or a 
great truth. Those who would have judges ex- 
empt from democratic control can not believe pro- 
fouiully in democracy's intrinsic worth. 

The democratic theory of government assumes 
that a free and intelligent people, who are self- 
governing, will quickly perceive and correct their 
own mistakes. History shows that when they 
really have been scIf-governin,g, when their will 
has not been frustrated or obstructed by special 
interests or privileged groups, this assumption 
has proved well founded. 

Opponents of the election and recall of judges 
say that the people must be safeguarded against 
themselves; that the people are prone to frenzy 
and need checks and keepers. But is any restraint 
so good as self-restraint? Is it not the best way 
to develop self-restraint to let it grow with prac- 
tice? 

A people who find that recalling a just judge 
for bravely doing his duty does not promote 
tlicir welfare will learn not to use the recall on 
that kind of judge, but to reserve it for judges 
who usurp authority, toady to privilege or other- 
wise betray the common weal. Who is wiser 
than the common wisdom? 

There is no way by which the people can per- 
manently be kept from auditing the services of 
judges. In this country they are the source of 
jjower. They make constitutions. There is among 
them the determination, firm and as we believe 
growing, that the judiciary, as well as the legis- 
iatures and executives, shall minister to their wel- 
fare. They will not be content to elect lavv- 
makers and law enforcers pledged to certain poli- 
cies only to have those policies defeated by judi- 
cial construction. 

Tlie alternative to popular control of judges is 
not the status quo; it is revolution. 



Labor Omnia Vincit. 

Go-\-ernor Plaisted of Maine, in an address 
delivered at Lewiston on September 4 said: 
"( )r_q^anized labor has given to the State of 
Maine her Australian Ballot Law, organized 
labor has given to the State of Maine her 
initiative and referendum, and on Septem- 
ber 12 organized la1)or will give to the State 
of Maine a primary election law.'" 

The words of the Governor were a his- 
toric declaration and proved prophetic, for, 
on September 12 the citizens of Maine, led 
by organized labor, declared for direct pri- 
maries by a vote of 55,840 to 17,751. 

In 1891 the battle for the establishment 
of the Australian ballot system was begun 
by organized labor. It ended in a partial 
victory which was made complete in 1893 
by the establishment of the present law. 
Organized labor was not recognized as a 
political power then and the number of its 
adherents was not great, but they had the 
moral courage and the tenacity that enables 
men to surmount great barriers and they 
gained the day. 

In 1908 organized labor, represented by 
the Maine Federation of Labor, began the 
memorable struggle for the Initiative and 



the Referendum. Resolutions had been 
passed at the convention of the State body 
declaring for the system and they were fol- 
lowed by a campaign that will never be for- 
gotten in Maine. The support of the State 
Grange was asked and given and every nook 
and corner of the State was canvassed. The 
American Federation of Labor was request- 
ed to send representatives into the State 
and did so. The foes of organized labor and 
of progress became perniciously active. Bar- 
rels of money were used, and wagonloads of 
literature were scattered all over the State 
denouncing the system. Daily newspapers 
published columns of adverse criticisms and 
political orators came from diiTerent parts 
of the country, and made fervid appeals to 
the voters to defeat the proposition at the 
ballot-box. 

When the smoke of battle cleared away it 
was found that organized labor and her al- 
lies had won a great victory. The people 
by an overwhelming majority had declared 
in favor of the Initiative and Referendum. 

The Maine Federation of Labor has won 
the confidence of the citizens of the State 
and is now making preparations to mitiate 
other beneficent reforms. 



Women Are Victors. 

Facing determined opposition, and fight- 
ing without a murmur, 500 women in 
Brownsville have gained a signal victory 
over their employers. The employers were 
banded together by a strong organization 
and laughed at and treated with derision the 
demands of the women for a higher wage 
scale and a shorter work day. The women, 
too, were members of an organization, local 
No. 2 of the International Ladies' Garment 
Workers' Union, and when the battle ended 
their union was intact, while the association 
of the employers was shattered to pieces. 

Four weeks the struggle for better condi- 
tions waged, and the workers showed a 
spirit of determination that discouraged the 
employers to such an extent that some of 
them deserted their organization and made 
terms with their employes. Still the em- 
ployers made great eftorts to line up and 
continue the battle, but the workers kept 
on with a grim determination and one by 
one the manufacturers dropped out of the 
association until it became too weak to of- 
fer further resistance. When the final sur- 
render came the employers were without 
an organization, and the labor organization 
had compelled them to concede every de- 
mand made by its members. 

In Brownsville the ladies' tailors and 
dressmakers will now work fifty instead of 
fifty-four hours a week. Their wages will 
be increased 10 per cent, and the employers 
have learned that the demands of women, 
protected by a labor organization, must be 
taken seriously and treated with respect. 
The International Union rendered valuable 
assistance in the fight for better conditions. 



Pensions for Postal Clerks. 
Postmaster-General Hitchcock has an- 
nounced his determination to make an ap- 
peal to Congress for the establishment of a 
pension system that will provide for men 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, \% 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fisherm.en's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 

Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade. Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mar'- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E.. 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

Norsk Matros og Fyrboter Union, Skipi)ergaten 
4, Kristianii.. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eidareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavii, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemcene Ncdcrlandsclie Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenljurgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavcn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Marc, 
Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
bciter und Arheiterinncn Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World^s Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



lifginning September 1, all Quecns- 
l;iiul mine managers employing over 
20 men must Ik- certilicated, and the 
Minister may require that managers 
employing even fewer men obtain cer- 
tificates. 

Three hundred State school teach- 
ers met in Melbourne, Aus., recently, 
and carried a resolution that all sal- 
aries should be increased. It was 
agreed that a schedule should be laid 
before the Minister for Education. 

At a recent conference in Brisbane, 
.Aus., between the Builders and Con- 
tractors' Association and the Opera- 
tive Stonemasons' Society, it was 
agreed that the minimum rate should 
be lis. per day, and that the rate for 
skilled workers should be lis. 8d. per 
day. 

An important conference of repre- 
sentatives of the .-Xustralasian Butch- 
ers' Federation was held in Sydney 
recently to consider the situation in 
connection with piecework rates. 
Representatives from New South 
Wales, Queensland, and Victoria 
were present. 

Two more drivers who were al- 
leged to have disobeyed the orders 
of their masters, were charged at the 
Adelaide C.'Kus.) Police Court recent- 
ly with refusing to cart certain non- 
union nails. In each case the defend- 
ants were ordered to pay a fine, and 
costs, amounting to 25s. 

The dispute between the marble 
quarrymen and their employers at 
Carrara, Italy, still continues. The 
latter are firm in their assertions that 
they will not concede the demands of 
the workmen, and the quarrymen are 
determined not to recede. A general 
strike is novv threatened. 

The South Australian Government 
has instructed its representatives on 
the Tramways Trust to support the 
granting of official recognition to the 
Tramway Employes' Union and its 
officers, and has further directed them 
to bring those instructions promi- 
nently before the other members of 
the Trust. 

In the course of a debate in the 
South Australian House of Assembly 
recently, it was stated that immi- 
grants from the old country were be- 
ing given employment in the railway 
workshops at Islington to the exclu- 
sion of men who had spent the great- 
er part of their lives in South Aus- 
tralia. 

Tile Health Commissioner of 
Queensland, Dr. Elkington, reports 
that that State stands in imminent 
danger of epidemics of smallpox, dys- 
entery and malaria from Java, Dutch 
New Guinea, and the island archipela- 
goes — Thursday Island, through its 
pearling connection, being the rlirect 
channel of communication. 

Hundreds of newsboys in Liver- 
pool went on strike recently demand- 
ing an increase of two cents on each 
dozen of half-penny papers they sell. 
They have been receiving four cents 
on each dozen and are determined to 
be in line with the other workers who 
have secured increases recently. 

A number of instances of sweating 
of clerks were mentioned at a meet- 
ing of the Melbourne (Aus.) Clerks' 
Union recently. A clerk with 11 
years' service was paid 36s. weekly, 
while another, with five years' serv- 
ice, got 27s, 6d. A clerk reported that 
he had for six weeks never worked 
less than 102 hours, one week reach- 
ing 108 hours, receiving additional in 
pay only Is. tea money. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

SAN PEDRO California 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

427 RROINX STREET SAIN PEDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct frorn Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to Inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 






JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 
Medicines, Soaps and Toilet Articles 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Alex Eduard Malmberg, born 
Malmo, Sweden, 50 years old, tall, 
blond. Mr. Malmberg has been a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific in 1908. 

Torgen Sophus Thomsen, born in 
October, 1886, at Sonderburg, Schles- 
wig-Holstein, Germany, last heard of 
in .'\pril, 1907, at Montreal, is inquired 
for by his parents. Address Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building, San Francisco. 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tills Labei is 
on tlie Keg or Bottle 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Hans Merz, who went to Alaska in 
the spring of 1910 on the schooner 
Ottilie Fjord, and upon return left the 
vessel in Tacoma and has not been 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 




San Pedro Letter List. 

Alexandersen, P. Lang. Charles 
.\nderssen. Nils A. l^arsen. Kristlan 

Alton. John Ludviksen. A. -124'J 
Andersson, O. -1363 Leonarii, Henry 

Andersen, C. -907 . Lindroth, Gust 

Anderson, Sven H. Lundberg. F. 

Anderson, Axel Ludlow, J. J. 

Anderson, A. Luvlnse, John 

Anderson, Anders Laine, E. 

Andersen, Axel P. Lunder. Bjorn 

Andersen, Hans C. Lerch, Paul 

Anderson, Sam Meyer, H. 

Anderssen, Hilding MuUer. Robert 

Asplund, A. Mellerup. Jens 

Anderson, Chas. Muller. Chris 

Bergli, Borge Meyer, H. -1792 

Bolinhoff, Harry Martin, John B. 

Rulander, B. B. Miller, Charles 

Bertelsen, Peder Muller, A. 

Bjorklund, Eric S. Mattson, A. M. 

Berntson, Fred Moberg, Karl 

Krusbard. Ewalt Nurniinen, J. E. 

Beer. Frank G. Nystrom, Ragnar 

Butten, Roswell Nilsen, Edw. 

Rerg. B. Nordgren, Chas. 

Beriier. Axel Nilson, O. -lOGO 

Barland, E. Olsen. Gust 

Backlund. John Olsen, W. -753 
Christensen, A. 1325 Olsen, Hans C. 

Carlson, Carl Ong, George W. 

Cordia, P. Olsson, Enock 

Cliristiansen, G. Planert, Paul 

-1054 Pulkinen, A. 

Draeger. Paul J. Peterson, Carl 
Dean, J. Adolph 

Doyle, W. Peterosn, John 

Davidsen. W. W. Petersen, Laurltz 

Drager, M. Petersen, Julius 

Erickson, Edward Pederson, Olaf 

Engstrom, Richard Peterson, O. 

Eugene, John Pederson, Charles 

Fasholz, Daniel Peterson, W. 

Fischer. W. Quinn, William 

Fischer, J. -566 Rantman, R. 

Gusek, B. Roed. Leif 

Gravier, Eugene Rajala, Victor 

Gronlund, Oscar Rasmussen, Fred 

Graf. Otto Rustanius. J. 

Gray. Gustaf Raymond. J. 

Herman. Axel Rosental, John 

Hansen. Almar Ries, H. Wm. 

Holmes. Alex. Reuter, C. -476 

Hansen, C. -1910 Runden, Eden 

Hengst. Otto Scott, Ed 

Holm. Carl Sjostrom, Gus 

Hansen, Carl H. Sundberg. F. 

Heltwood, O. S. Siegurd, Justus 

Haggar, Fred. Svensen, Anker 

Hillig. A. Svensson, N. 

Halvorsen, H. E. Simpson, L. C. 

Hokonsen, John Sorensen, C. -1607 

Huisman, K. Samuelsen, Victor 

Huose, Frank Siman, Paul 

Hansen, Berger Steen. J. C. 

Hogele, Tom Swansen, Martin 

Hoglund, J. A. Snow. T\^ 

Heltman, Oscar Samuelsen. L. 

Halsten. Axel Smith, J. S. 

Hod. Fred Thorsen. Johannes 

Irwin, Robert Thompson, Stephen 

Indestad, A. Togersen. Peder 

Infoessen, Jon Tollefsen, R. 

Joliansen. Ernest Vestad, Thomas 

Johansen, Axel E. Willert, Charley 

Jensen, Johan F. W^oywood, August 
Janschewitz, J. 2033 Wettach. A. 

Jensen. J. -1801 Wehde, Fred 
Johnson, Louis, -137 Wrig, Ferdinand 

Jorgensen, J. W. Wiemer, Paul 

.Tones, Harry Westergard, L. 

Johnson, J. A. Williams, Harry 

Jacobson, J. Wallerhouse, J. 

John. Robert Woldhouse. J. 

Johansen, Soren Zorning. Arthur 

Johansen, Theodor Photos and Packages 

Johansson. John E. Bergstrom. A. 

Johansson, A. -1874 Grossl, Joe 

Kuhne. W. Huose. Frank 

Kolostow. J. Olsen. A. 

Kalow, Robert Pothoff, Harry 

Karlson. Ragnar Petersen, Mike 

Kassama, N. Raustanius, J. 

Krotoschin, H. Samuelsen, Victor 
Kallas, M. 

The following membership books are In 
San Pedro Agency: 



Ahrenlus, Carl H. 

-821 
Anderson, P. -1720 
Briwik, Askild S. 

-1805 
Boylan, C. J. -1219 
Brown, Charles R. 

-1832 
Erickson, C. -281 
Peterson, P. L. -1408 



Predrlcksen, Hans 

-529 
Graham, Larry M. 

-907 
Hedenskog, J. A. 

-1293 
Lindholm. Carl, -454 
Larsen, Alfred -1606 
Pangioten, E. -1404 



I 

I 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Will Martin Billington, who was 
employed at Hallverville Cannery last 
summer, communicate at once with 
F. R. Wall, attorney for Otto Schel- 
lin, 324 Merchants' Exchange, San 
Francisco? 

A.idrew Andersen, a native of Twe- 
destrand, Norway, is inquired for. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Axel Osen, a native of Orlandet, 
Throndjem, aged 23, is inquired for 
by his mother. 

Richard liyan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 

The U. S. District Court in New 
Orleans has decided the case of John 
Kauer vs. the SS. Dover in favor of 
the libelant, and the New Orleans 
Agent has collected the money. Any 
one knowing the address of John 
Kauer, please communicate with the 
Sailors' Agent in New Orleans, 
George C. Bodine, 514 Dumaine St. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The steamship Umatilla arrived at Seattle on 
September 16 from Nome with $350,000 in gold, 
of which $150,000 was from Iditarod. 

Bringing 26,000 cases of salmon to the North 
Alaska Salmon Company, the bark Olympic, Cap- 
tain Evans, arrived at San Francisco on Septem- 
ber 16, twenty days from Naknek. 

Bringing gold bullion valued at more than 
$500,000, a valuable shipment of Alaska furs and 
a passenger list of 212, the steamship Victoria 
arrived at Seattle on September 20 from Nome. 

The following changes of masters have been 
recorded at San Francisco: Anthony de Mattos, 
to succeed H. I. Morrison as master of the 
schooner Guide; Thomas J. Lowe, to succeed R. 
E. Carey as master of the steamer U. S. Grant. 

The California Shipping Company, which once 
operated a large fieet of sailing vessels, has dis- 
posed of its last carrier. The announcement is 
made that the bark Pactolus has been sold to the 
Naknek Packing Company on private terms. She 
will be used as a salmon packet. 

The Harrison line, a British company, which 
owns forty-six steamships, announces a new ser- 
vice between Puget Sound and Europe, one 
steamer to sail every thirty days, and twelve ves- 
sels to be employed. They will be thirteen-knot 
ships of 6000 tons. 

Divers have recovered $150,000 in gold from the 
wreck of the steamship Ramona, which foundered 
on Spanish Island, Alaska, recently. They also 
brought up some of the baggage and mails and a 
portion of the cargo of canned salmon. The ship 
is broken in two amidships, and is a total loss. 

It is proposed to build another steamer, larger 
than the one now being built in the East for the 
Olson & Mahony Steamship Company, to operate 
between Pacific ports and the Atlantic Coast, and 
it is expected that the steamer will be ready for 
service upon the completion of the Panama 
Canal. 

Four salmon packers arrived at San Francisco 
on September 17 from .Alaska. The combined 
cargoes amounted to over 60.000 cases. The Star 
of Chile brought in 17,102, and the Star of Rus- 
sia brought in 15.000 cases. The schooner Zampa 
brought in 2400 barrels of salmon. The bark 
Star of Peru arrived with 10,000 cases. 

The Oceanic Steamship Company is going to 
reconstruct its steamers Ventura and the Sonoma 
for the Australian service within the next seven 
months. The vessels have been idle in San Fran- 
cisco Bay since 1906, when they were retired from 
the Australian service. The total cost of the re- 
construction will, it is estimated, be $750,000. 

The San Francisco-Portland Steamship Com- 
pany is negotiating for the purchase in New York 
of two modern steamers to operate on the run 
between Portland, San Francisco and San Pedro. 
In the event that the new steamers are secured, 
the steamer Rose City will be taken off the south- 
ern run and will be operated only between San 
Francisco and Portland. 

In tow of the steamer Klamath, the new 
steamer Willamette, latest addition to the fleet of 
steam-schooners operated by Charles R. McCor- 
mick & Co., arrived at San Francisco on Septem- 
ber 19 from Eureka, where she was constructed. 
The new craft is similar to the Klamath. She has 
a lumber-carrying capacity of 1,000,000 feet and 
can accommodate sixty-five passengers. 

When the Norwegian steamer Christian Bors 
arrives at San Francisco early next month with 
a cargo of coal from Norfolk for the Mare Island 
Navy Yard, she will enter the service of Andrew 
Weir, being under cliarter to load lumber for 
Australia. After discharging her coal, the vessel 
will proceed to Eureka to take a large shipment 
of redwood, and from there will go to the Sound 
to complete her load. 

.Another of the large fleet of foreign steamers 
chartered by the Government to bring coal from 
the Atlantic to the Coast arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on Sei)tember 21. She is the Norwegian 
steamer Guernsey, Captain Sorenson, and made 
the passage from Norfolk in sixty-nine days. The 
vessel brought 6324 tons of coal, which will be 
discharged into the naval bunkers at California 
City. 

A San Francisco steamship company has or- 
dered three new large steamers to meet the grow- 
ing requirements of the interstate coastal trade 
of Australia. These vessels will embody the 
latest ideas in architecture and equipment 
throughout, and will have the wireless telegrapli 
installation. Passenger accommodation will form 
a leading feature and the vessels will be ready 
in about one year. 

The Toyo Kisen Kaisha has issued a staUMiicnt 
of profit and loss for the half year ending De- 
cember 31. 1910, which shows that the total re- 
ceipts were $1,744,665, as against $1,.335,.383 dis- 
bursements. Of the surplus, $402,653 was set 
aside to cover former losses, all of which have 
now been cleared away. The principal receipts 



were: Freight, $376,339; passengers, $518,708; 
Government subsidy, $653,132. 

Jacob Dobblelaar has been appointed master 
of the schooner Annie Miner, vice J. A. Jackson; 
Dobblelaar also succeeds Jackson as master of 
the schooner Martinez; L. E. Masson of the 
steamer Fox, vice Joseph Santos; Ernest Mohr 
of the steamer Crowley 3, vice George W. Mat- 
toon; George W. Mattoon, vice Alexander Mc- 
Laughlin; Frank Foppiano of the steamer James 
N. Gillett, vice E. J. Burns. 

After being abandoned on Clatsop Spit, near 
the mouth of the Columbia River, on August 30 
by her master and crew, the steam-schooner 
Aurelia is again in the lumber trade. She ar- 
rived at San Pedro on September 21 from Colum- 
bia River with a cargo for the National Lumber 
Company. Heavy swells carried the steamer off 
the spit into deep water and she was towed to 
Portland and fitted with a new rudder and shoe. 

The power schooner Santa Rosa sailed from 
San Pedro on September 21 for San Miguel Is- 
land, where an effort will be made to save the 
schooner Comet, recently wrecked there. The 
Comet was owned by John A. Hooper of San 
Francisco and has been sold to Vail & Vickers, 
who own both the island and schooner Santa 
Rosa. Captain Wolton, master of the Santa 
Rosa, thinks the Comet may be saved. Much 
of the cargo is on the beach and the remainder 
is intact in the hold of the schooner. 

Superintendent Varney of the Life Saving 
service reports that in conformity with his sug- 
gestions, the department lias authorized a Dob- 
bins life-saving surfboat for Grays Harbor to re- 
place an old one. The new boat is being built by 
George W. Kneass in San Francisco. It will be 
thirty feet long and will be self-bailing and self- 
righting. Gasoline power-boats have been ordered 
and are being built in New Jersey for the life- 
saving stations at Point Bonita, Yaquina Bay, 
Or.; Tillamook Bay and Grays Harbor. 

While the sailing vessel is gradually disappear- 
ing an exception is to be noted in the La France, 
about to be launched. This vessel will be 303 
feet in length, with a beam of 52 feet, and will be 
the largest railway craft in the world. She will 
carry 19,500 square feet of canvas upon five 
masts. The vessel will be lighted with electricity 
and have a steam heating plant. A number of 
large cabins, richly furnished, will be provided for 
passengers. For use in calms La France will be 
equipped with a small auxiliary engine. 

Several well-known shipping men have incor- 
porated the South Coast Steamship Company, 
with a capitalization of $100,000. The concern 
will give a passenger and freight service between 
San Francisco and Santa Cruz, Monterey and 
Moss Landing. The power schooner Newark has 
been chartered for one year. The steam-schooner 
South Coast will be operated later. The officers 
of the company are: L. M. Hancock, president; 
W. J. Woodside, vice-president and general man- 
ager, and W. L. Hancock, secretary. 

The British steamer Port Kingston, built in 
1904 at Glasgow, has been purchased by the 
Union Steamship Company for service on the 
Canadian-Australian line pending the completion 
of the 10,000-ton liner order for this service by 
the Union Company. It is understood that the 
Port Kingston will replace the Zealandia, which 
is owned by the New Zeal-and Shipping Com- 
pany. The steamer has accommodations for 160 
first-class and sixty second-class passengers and 
can reach a speed of seventeen to eighteen knots 
an hour. 

Contracts for the construction of three steam- 
whalers, oil burning and built of steel, have been 
let by the Coast representatives of Balfour, 
Guthrie & Co. to the Moran Company of Seattle. 
The new craft will be identical in type with the 
steel-whalers Paterson and Moran, launched a 
few months ago. These vessels arc already in 
commission off the west coast of Vancouver Is- 
land. They have a speed of eleven knots per 
hour and are equipped with whaling guns and all 
necessary paraphernalia. The three vessels just 
contracted for will cost about $185,000 in the 
aggregate. 



SAILORS READ THIS! 

A company owning over twenty-one sf|tiare 
miles of rich, well-watered lands, all free of debt, 
wants you to join them in raising sugar cane and 
cattle. You are guaranteed 6 per cent interest 
and you also share in the big dividends. 

Certificates are $100 each, payable cash, or $2 
each month until paid. 

Here is Your Chance to Make Money. 
Share in the profits of this great ranch. Secure 
an INCOME FOR LIFE. 

Write for free booklet, 

LOS HORCONES PLANTATION CO. 

710 Grosse Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1% Lewi-s St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., IVaA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me.. 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 Soutli St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE. Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS ANL ^TER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLAN'"iC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 Soutli St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE. Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 Broad. 

Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 53 St. Anne St. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West I-ake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
MARINE CITY, Mich., P. O. Box 773. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
HURON, O., Lake Seamen's Union. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, III., 316 Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodhrldge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N, Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. 111., m N. Clark SI. 
ASHTABULA, O.. 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO. ()., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT. Mlrh.. 7 East Woodhrldge St. 
I'T. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
CONNIO.MI'I', n., 922 Dny St 
OGDIONSIiURG. N. Y., 70 Isnbelln St. 
N, TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
Siri'ERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
HAY C!ITY, Mlrh., lOK Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St, 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHIIR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOtTRNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. Tlie JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 27. 1911. 



OFFICRRS AND LICENSES. 



Tlic .\ttorncy-Gcner.T! of the United States h.ns 
furnislied the Local Inspector.s of Steam Vessel.^ 
with an opinion a.s to their powers under the law 
to compel witnes.«es to answer questions during 
investigations. The Attornej'-General's opinion 
will he relied upon, at the Santa Rosa wreck in- 
vestigation ne.xt Tuesday should Tiiird Officer F. 
J. Thomas of the wrecked steamer repeat his re- 
fusal to testify. The opinion is, in part, as fol- 
lows: 

"A licensed officer of a steam vessel, duly sum- 
moned to give testimony in a hearing hcfore a 
Board of United States Local Inspectors of Steam 
Vessels, who refuses to answer questions which 
are, in the opinion of the Board, material and 
proper, may be compelled to answer under pen- 
alty of suspension or revocation of his license or 
otherwise. 

"A refusal on the part of a witness to answer 
a proper question pertinent to the issue before a 
court is a contempt, and while^ this power may 
not be absolute in this special tribunal, wliich is 
not given the right to impose fines or imprison- 
ment for disobedience to its authority, neverthe- 
less the principle may be invoked so far as the 
special service and special discipline go. 

"Such licensed officers are engaged in a special 
service, peculiarly related to the Government; they 
are endowed with certain privileges and subject 
to certain burdens, and a paramount consideration 
of the good of the service requires that such an 
officer shall not be permitted to withhold any in- 
formation material to an inquiry aflfecting the 
service and yet remain a member of that service." 

TIic foregoing recalls vividly the position 
occupied l)y the licensed sliip's officer in re- 
s])ect to his rights as a citizen. Theoreti- 
cally the license granted by the L'nitcd 
States to a deck officer or engineer is a 
guarantee of his ability to discharge his 
duty. Practically, however, the license is 
a return for the surrender of the holder's 
rights both as a man and as a citizen. The 
"certain privileges" mentioned by the At- 
torney-General include chiefly the privilege 
of securing employment. The "certain bur- 
dens" referred to include the burden of 
being forced to work at the dictation of 
ether persons. 

The opinion here quoted has a special 
significance. Third Officer F, T. Thomas, 
of the steamer Sanfa Ro.sa, is about to be 
placed on trial in connection with the loss 
of that vessel. It appears that during the 
investigation into the responsibility of Cap- 
tain I'aria in the same connection, Tliomas 
was ])laced on the stand and interrogated. 
Acting upon the advice of his counsel 



Thomas refused to answer certain questions, 
upon the ground that to do so would tend 
to incriminate him. In this Thomas was 
exercising the right granted to every per- 
son placed upon the witness-stand. Now it 
appears, under the opinion of t^ie Attorney- 
General, that Thomas can be compelled to 
testify against himself upon pain of revo- 
cation of his license. Thus the license is 
used to deprive the holder of a right in- 
hering in every man who is called before 
the bar of justice. 

We belie\'e that the conditions of grant- 
ing and holding a license to navigate a ship 
should be as stringent as may be necessary 
to insure the highest degree of skill on the 
part of the ship's officer. Beyond that the 
obligation of the licensed officer should not 
go. In other words, the granting of a license 
by the Government should not give the lat- 
ter any hold upon the officer that is incon- 
sistent with his personal freedom, freedom 
to accept or reject employment, to remain 
in or leave employment at his own pleasure 
subject only to considerations of the ves- 
sel's immediate safety. 

To say that "licensed officers are engaged 
in a special service peculiarly related to the 
Government" is to suggest the idea of en- 
listment, as in the Navy. Indeed this idea 
has been very frankly stated in more than 
one instance. Such a suggestion is contrary 
to the facts and repugnant to the liberty of 
the citizen, whether employed at sea or on 
land. As a matter of fact, the licensed offi- 
cer is not endowed by the Government with 
any privileges. On the contrary, the Gov- 
ernment is the beneficiary of the system of 
licensing ships' officers. The latter, by fit- 
ting themselves for their duties, give the 
Government a guarantee of their skill and 
reliability. In return they i-eceive a certifi- 
cate of their competency. 

True, the Government refuses to permit 
the employment of men who do not possess 
a license. On the other hand, the Govern- 
ment does not guarantee employment to the 
holder of a license. The licensed officer 
must take his chances of securing employ- 
ment, just as does any other man. The ac- 
tion of the Government in revoking licenses 
upon any ground other than that of proved 
incompetency is a violation of good faith, a 
misuse of power the natural effect of which 
is to destroy the inducement to qualify for 
employment in positions of responsibility 
on board ship. Such action is therefore 
clearly contrary to public policy. 



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 



On October 10, less than two weeks from 

date, the people of California will vote upon 

a numl)er of proposed amendments to the 

State Constitution. In a sense the special 

election will be the most important in the 

history of the State. Following are the 

amendments indorsed by the California 

State Federation of Labor: 

.\mendment No. 2 (number 1 on the ballot), 
authorizing State Inspection of Weights and 
Measures. 

.'\mendment No. 8 (number 4 on the ballot), 
granting Suffrage to Women. 

.^mendmcnt No. 22 (number 7 on the ballot), 
establishing the Initiative and the Referendum. 

Amendment No. 23 (number 8 on the ballot), 
establishing the recall of all elective ofiRcials, in- 
chuling judges. 

.•\nicnilment No. 32 (number 10 on the ballot), 
authorizing the Legislature to enact a compul- 
sory Employers' Liability and Compensation law 
for Industrial Accidents. 

Amendment No. 50 (number 23 on the ballot). 



increasing the power of the Railroad Commis- 
sion over rates of transportation. 

These amendments are of the highest import- 
ance to the people of California. It is urged that 
the labor organizations throughout the State 
make a special effort to create public sentiment 
in favor of these measures, and especially to 
insure that the full vote of the respective locali- 
ties shall be polled on October 10. 



NO. 10 ON THE BALLOT. 



This caption is a reminder of the Work- 
men's Compensation amendment to the 
Constitution of California. Others of the 
proposed amendments may be more im- 
portant in a general way, but No. 10 is most 
important in its bearings upon industrial 
conditions. Every workingman and everv 
citizen who appreciates the value of justice 
in the industrial relations should vote for 
the ^^'orkmen's Compensation amendment. 

The prospects are that No. 10 will be 
adopted by a very large vote, probably the 
largest vote cast on any proposition. The 
statement issued by the Secretary of State, 
containing arguments for and against each 
of the proposed amendments, contains no 
argument against No. 10. Two statements, 
one by Senator Roseberry and one by Sen- 
ator Welch, favor the arnendment. This 
fact is significant, we believe, of the trend 
of public opinion on the subject. 

By adopting the Workmen's Compensa- 
tion amendment California will be placed 
in line with progressive, humane sentiment 
throughout the world. The old Common 
Law rule of employers' liability is a dis- 
credited and abandoned institution in every 
enlightened community. That rule made 
the compensation of injured workmen con- 
tingent upon the fault of the employer. 
Such a rule, while it may have been reason- 
able in an early stage of industry, has long 
been a mere travesty upon common sense 
and common humanity. The well-known 
facts of the industrial world have led to the 
substitution of the "trade-risk" as the rule 
of compensation. 

Under this rule it is recognized that every 
workman necessarily incurs certain risks, 
that so and so many workmen are certain 
to be injured in a given industry during a 
given period, consequently that some means 
must be found to compensate the sufferers. 
The means generally employed consist in 
insurance against accidents, administered 
either through insurance companies or di- 
rectly by the employers in each industry. 
By this means the burden of compensation 
rests ultimately upon the public, the indi- 
vidual proportion of which is infinitesimal. 

The adoption of .Amendment No. 10 will 
enable the Legislature to apply this princi- 
ple of "trade-risk" to the industries of the 
State. This principle is now in operation 
in twenty-four foreign countries and many 
States of our own country. As a sugges- 
tion of the advantages of this principle, it 
is an acknowledged fact that in no instance 
has any country, having adopted the Com- 
pensation system, gone back to the Liabil- 
ity system. California is going to take a 
giant stride on the path of progress on Oc- 
tober 10. The victory thus achieved will 
be no more clearly signalized by the vote 
upon any of the proposed amendments than 
by that cast in favor of the Workmen's 
Compensation proposition. 

Roll up a bumper vote for Amendment 
No. 32— NO. 10 O.^J THE RALI/Vn 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



GOMPERS AT SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



I have enough to do and enough matters to oc- 
cupy my attention without at least "butting in" 
on local affairs. But I am here in San Francisco, 
and since my silence would, no doubt, be miscon- 
strued, I therefore propose to talk. 

The whole world of capitalists had a nightmare 
when P. H. McCarthy was elected Mayor. Dur- 
ing his administration every act has been the sub- 
ject not only of scrutiny, but of dissection, and 
I am willing to assume that he has not been per- 
fect. He is a man, and being a man, like all of 
us, he must necessarily have some imperfections. 
I do not know who of you claim to be perfect. 
1 know I am not. There is only one man in the 
whole world who can make no mistake, but you 
are not that man, nor am I. I do not know Mc- 
Carthy's opponent. There have been some excel- 
lent things said of him to me. I have no right 
to doubt them and do not, but I propose if I 
can to follow the slogan of the American labor 
movement, and that is to elect to public office 
faithful workmen with union cards in their pock- 
ets. More than likely mistakes have been made, 
and more than likely flaws may be picked. But 
under which administration in the whole world, 
from the Mayor of a city, the Constable, if you 
please, the Governor of a State, the President of 
the United States, any king, potentate or czar, if 
you try to use the scalpel and dissecting knife 
will you not be able to find some fault? Say what 
you will, this is true, let any one say what he will, 
if it should happen that P. H. McCarthy would 
not be elected Mayor of San Francisco in the 
coming election, the only interpretation that the 
enemies of labor would place upon the result, it 
would be the repudiation of the labor movement 
of San Francisco. T tell you, men and women, I 
would prefer to be in the minority in this fight if 
the minority should be our side, than to be with a 
victory for the other side. If any defeat is to 
come, let it come while we are fighting. 

You know me. I am a man who believes in 
the exercise of all our faculties, and I prefer that 
we, outside of our unions, take part in the politi- 
cal arena. I say to you, do not let the trade 
unions slip through your hands. Remember that, 
after all, it will be your trade unions upon which 
you will have to depend, win or lose. I have 
known the trade unionists of San Francisco for 
many years. We understand each other. Some- 
times we have differed, but as a rule we have 
been as one. And I am proud of the opportunity 
of being here on this Labor Day and saying to 
you what I have. But I cannot close without 
saying one word upon a topic which is as keen 
as any other. I want to say with particular em- 
phasis, the thought I uttered years ago that our 
trade union movement, our political and social 
life cannot find its highest expression imtil that 
time when we shall have enfranchised the women 
of our country, not only in the political fran- 
chise, but as the labor movement stands for 
equality of rights of men and women, in the 
equality of opportunity that she shall receive 
the same pay for the same work, and not only to 
declare it as an academic proposition, but if 
necessary to struggle and to go hungry to se- 
cure it. 

I ought to have said a moment ago that that 
which I said concerning his honor. Mayor Mc- 
Carthy, I say of every trade unionist associated 
with him, even with their shortcomings. 

I can not close this address without expressing 
to the School Board of San Francisco my pro- 
found appreciation and gratitude for that which 
it has done. It reflects great credit upon your 
city and people, and it is doubtless due to the 
fact that the trade unionists have a fighting and 
aggressive trade unionist as the Mayor of San 
Francisco. 

Just a word to the girls and boys who won the 
prizes. You can have no appreciation at this 
time of that which you have done. As time goes 
on, you, young girls and boys, will realize that 
when you were school pupils you gave this, the 
creation of your heart and mind, as your contri- 
bution to the intellectual and material uplift of 
your fellow-beings. I was greatly impressed 
with the wonderful expressions of these boys and 
girls. The thought occurred to me that the men, 
the blind men, who are antagonizing the labor 
movement, should have heard the two essays 
and have read the other essays, which it was not 
my privilege to hear, and then have asked them- 
selves whether their hope of crushing the labor 
movement is possible of success when children 
will give utterance to the highest and best ex- 
pressions of freedom. And. let me say again to 
you, young ladies and gentlemen prize winners, 
I wish to express the hope that the thing will not 
occur with you which so often occurs to young 
men and women when they have won a prize in 
any particular field of study and activity — fre- 
((uently it occurs that when the prize has been re- 
ceived and the diploma framed, they imagine 
they have reached the goal of their ambition. Let 
it be but the beginning of your efforts. And to 
the boys and girls of the schools of San Fran- 
cisco who have not been awarded prizes, let me 
say that frequently the laggard in the first race 
proves himself the one possessed of the greatest 
prowess in the long contest. Do not be discour- 
aged. You are doing the world's work in your 
own way. Each one must do his or hers. We 
can not neglect it. We dare not fail to do it. We 
must either move forward in the great phalanx 



of humanity or be crushed. 

Men and women of San Francisco, for all the 
attention and honor you have given me, for all 
your magnificent demonstration, I am profoundly 
grateful, and hope T will be able to express my 
appreciation in the greatest service I can render 
you in the cause of freedom and humanity. 



ABOUT THE CONVENTION. 



Comrades : — As we are about to hold 
another convention of the International, it 
may be well to have the following facts 
in mind. A convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America should be com- 
posed of men who are as nearly as is pos- 
sible, truly representative of the members 
composing the various unions. This end 
will not be served by electing officers of 
the unions as delegates, as it seems to be 
the opinion of many members that the of- 
ficers of the unions have more than their 
fair share of power. It might be good pol- 
icy to elect all five delegates from those 
members who do not hold office. 

It should be remembered that our Secre- 
tary is also the President of the Interna- 
tional and the Constitution provides for his 
presence at the Convention, and the ex- 
pense is borne by the International. This 
is al.so true of the Editor of the JouRN.\r.. As 
we have two well-posted officials of the Union, 
who go to the convention under any circum- 
stances, it will not be good tactics to elect 
more officers as delegates if we wish to 
keep the convention representative of the 
seagoing membership. Surely it is possible 
to dig up five men out of five thousand 
who are capable and representative of the 
Sailors of the Pacific Coast. 

Having selected our delegates let us pro- 
ceed to instruct them to amend the Con- 
stitution, that it will be possible to put a 
referendum at any time. Also to amend 
that section dealing with the calling of 
conventions. Let there be no date set for 
any future convention. Should it become 
ftecessary or desirable to call a convention 
at any time, the matter can be settled by 
the membership through the referendum. 

Let us also instruct our delegates to use 
their best endeavor to assist the Legislative 
Committee in forwarding the legislation 
favorable to seamen now pending in Con- 
gress. 

Let us pledge each and every delegate to 
abide by the instruction given by the Union. 

Remember the instructions are a com- 
mand, and are of more importance than the 
individuals who may be chosen as delegates. 
Between the present and the time of the de- 
parture of the delegates, the unions should 
come to some understanding on all the var- 
ious questions likely to be brought up at 
the sessions of the convention. 

All vital questions of policy should be 
settled and the instructions should be clear 
and definite, so there can be no room for 
misunderstanding. 

Proceeding along these or similar lines 
will give us something approaching to popu- 
lar government in the Union. 
Fraternally yours, 

CiiAS. M. Ai.iiKECiri-. 



Heads of Philadelphia Police Department 
plan to equip each patrolman with a pocket 
electric searchlight. 



In the first seven months this year over 
70,000 persons emigrated from Great Britain 
to British North America. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 25, 1911. 

Regular meeting came to order at 7:30 p. m., 
O. Wahrcnberg presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. 

NOTICE: Nominations of delegates to con- 
vention of the International Seamen's LTnion of 
.America will be made at Headquarters and 
Branches on or about October 2, and balloting 
for delegates will take place in regular meetings 
.it l-lead(|uarters and Branches on or about No- 
vember 6. 

A. FURUSETH, Secrctarv. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 18, 1911. 
Situation imchangcd. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
165 Cordova St. West. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 18, 1911. 
No meeting; shipping fair; prospects imcertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 18, 1911. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 18, 1911. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229;X Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 18, 1911. 
Ship])ing slow; prospects good. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Ro.x 6. Tel. 2002. 



Portland, Ore., Agency, Sept. 18, 1911. 
.Shijiping medium. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
P. O. Ro.x 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency. Sept. 19, 1911. 
.Vo meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 18. 1911. 
Shi])ping medium; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 12, 1911. 
Shii)i)ing good; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, .S'ln Francisco. Cal., Sept. 21, 1911. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m.. Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported sliipping fair. The shipwreck benefit 
was ordered paid to ten members wrecked on the 
steamer Ramona at Spanish Island. .Maska. 

EITGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle -Agency, Sept. 15, 1911. 
.Sliipjiing medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agenl. 
1003 Western Ave. P. O. Box 1335. Phone 
Sun M:iin 2233. 



San Pedro .\gency, Sept. 13, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair; few 
men ashore. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

I lrad(|uarters, Chicpgo, Sept. 18, 1911. 
Geiier.il r-ituation satisfactory. 

VICTOR A. OLANDER, Secretary. 
570 W. Lake St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters. Boston, Mass., Sept. 18, 1911. 
Shipping and i)rospects fair. 

WM. H. I'RAZIER, Secretary. 
l'/^.\ Lewis St. 



DIED. 

1 U-r!n;ni Hryggman, No. 844, a native of Fin- 
I.mkI. a'.;ed 39, (lied at San lM-;incisco, Cal., Sept. 
18, 1911. 

.'\nton Olsen. No. 15, a nalive of Norv/ay. aged 
51 .lied at San I'rancisco. C;il., on Sri)t. 19. 1011. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 









^^^** 


OIN THE GREAT LAKES. 

(Contiibuted by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




*^^* 



'HELLFARE" NEWS. 



Three times in three consecutive niontlis ships 
of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company have been 
in collision with small wooden steamers in the 
waters between Lake Erie and Port Huron. The 
third accident of this nature happened Tuesday 
night when the steamer J. H. Hoyt, downbound 
with ore, and the small sand steamer C. H. Little 
came together in Lake St. Clair. The Little was 
towed toward Detroit, but sunk in shoal wster 
at Belle Isle where she was floated by her own 
pumps yesterday. 

.According to those who were aboard the two 
steamers the IJttle. upbound light, was passing 
through Lake St. Clair when the Hoyt was sight- 
ed near the lightship. Passing signals were said 
to have been properly given by both boats, but 
the Little bumped into the Hoyt just forward of 
amidship. Plates on the Hoyt were dented. 

The bows of the Little were crushed, boilers 
were shaken loose and a steam pipe broken. An- 
drew Pauper and Michael Techan, members of 
the crew of the T^ittle. were painfully burned by 
escaping steam. The tug Gill took the crew oflf 
and the steamer City of Mt. Clemens towed the 
Little toward Detroit but did not get her beyond 
Relle Isle. After being raised to-day she went 
to Detroit, where she will go into the drydock 
of the American Shipbuilding Company for re- 
pair.><, which will require about ten days' work. 

On July 18 the stcanur Gates sank the steamer 
Tampa, a sand boat, which was unloading at Wal- 
kcrville. The Tampa now is at Detroit pending 
negotiations looking toward an adjustment of 
damages. .August 26 the steamer Gilbert ran into 
and sank the steamer City of Genoa, which was 
anchored off Sarnia bcciuse of a dense fog. 

The Reid Wrecking Company has started to 
build a cofferdam about the City of Genoa prepa- 
ratory to raising the boat. The grain cargo, con- 
.■■•isting of about 100.000 bushels, part wheat and 
jiart corn, has been sold by Port Huron parties 
who purchased it for $13,555 to the American 
Cattle j't Poultrv Food Company of Binglianiton, 
N. Y. 

Cleveland Boat Sinks Patrol. 

The United States tug Circle, which is cm- 
ployed by the Government to patrol the Portage 
lake waterway, was rammed and sunk yesterday 
by the steamer Martin Mullen at the entrance to 
Portage Lake ship canal. 

The tug was moored at the canal rcvotniont. 
The Mullen, upbound light, was approaching the 
tug when she sheered into the Circle. Life sav- 
ers took the crew off the tug and then towed the 
small craft out of the main channel, where she 
went to the bottom. 

A steering gear accident sent the steamer City 
of Kalamazoo into the pier at Saugatuck, Mich., 
about 9 o'clock yesterday forenoon. The ship 
was in a dangerous position, as she was pounding 
against the pier. Tugs released her after two 
hours' work and before any serious damage was 
done. 

Rains of yesterday and the day before caused 
the current in Cuyahoga River to reach a point 
where it was not safe to try to take the steamers 
Hubbard and .Mhright to the Central furnace 
dock. They were held in the breakwater until 
after midnight. 

Receiver for Commonwealth. 

John H. Fox, a resident of Pittsburg, who 
claims to be the owner of thirty-six shares of the 
stock of the Commonwealth Steamship Company, 
yesterday applied to the United States District 
Court to have a receiver appointed to handle the 
property of the steamship company. He alleges 
in the petition that the fleet has btcn misman- 
aged, fees privately collected and some of the 
directors urged with the result that a deal has 
been made to sell two of the best boats of the 
fleet for $100,000 apiece less than they are worth. 
A hearing will be had to look into the charges. 

Investigation Started. 

Toledo. September 13. — To establish the respon- 
sibility for the loss of seven lives when the 
freighter Philip Minch struck the launch Nemo 
in IVIaumce Bay September 2, the Government 
started an investigation in the steamboat inspec- 
tors* office here to-day. 

Four members of the crew of ihe freighter were 
examined this morning and Michael Mayer, the 
sole survivor of the laun'ch party, will be placed 
on the st.'ind. The findings of the inspectors will 
be sent to WashiuKton. 

Beached After Collision. 

!)etr<>it. .September 13. — The sand steamer C. 
II. Little, which sank in shoal water above the 
head of lielle Isle Tue.'-day night after a collision 
with the steel steamer James H. Hoyt, of the 
Pittsburg Steamship Company's fleet, was floated 



to-day with her own pumps under direction of 
Captain Alex Ruelle. She was brought to the 
Detroit Shipbuilding Company's drydock at the 
foot of Orleans street. She will be in the dock 
a week or ten days. 

The Little, a wooden steamer, 144 feet long, 
28 feet beam and 8 feet deep, operated by the 
C. H. Little Company, of this city, was bound up 
for a cargo of sand. Near Lake St. Clair light 
vessel at the intersection of the Grosse Pointe 
and .St. Clair Flats ranges, she met the Hoyt 
coming down with ore. It is supposed a misun- 
derstanding of signals caused the collision. The 
Little struck the Hoyt near amidships on the port 
side, denting a few plates. 

The collision smashed the Little's bows, unset- 
tled her boilers and broke a steam pipe. Two of 
her crew, Michael Techan and .'\ndrew Pauper, 
were painfully scalded in their quarters. The tug 
.Mice M. Gill and steamer City of Mt. Clemens, 
which were near by, took off the Little's crew 
and towed the sinking vessel into shoal water. 



GRAIN FOR DULUTH. 



Receipts of all grains at lOiiliith elevators 
for the current crop season are estimated at 
7.^,000,000 bushels, which would compare 
with 42,8.S0,799 bushels last year and 90,- 
702,204 bushels for the year before. 

The above figures are arrived at, says the 
Duluth News Tribune, through splitting the 
(lififcrence between the minimum and maxi- 
mum estimates of cxj)erts prepared after go- 
ing over the territory, and the com])ilation 
of data available. 

On the basis of the Government's Septem- 
ber crop report, showing a loss of 3.1 per 
cent, from the .August figures, a total spring 
wheat yield of 203,646,000 bushels is indi- 
cated. 

It is to be taken into considcratinn, too, 
that since the beginning of the month, a 
further allowance must be made for grain 
damaged in the shock through the rainy 
s])ell that intervened. That it is thought 
will result in lowering the grade upon a per^ 
centage of the crop. 

Under normal conditions, a larger pro])or- 
tion of the total yield would come to this 
market, as the crops in Northern Minnesota 
and the portions of North Dakota tributary 
to it are denoted as nearly up to the average. 

All that is conterbalanced, though, by the 
certainty that Minneapolis millers must 
reach into the Duluth territory for their 
supplies consequent upon the crop failure 
in South Dakota. 

A line elevator company with 130 houses 
in the Northwest predicts the bulk of the 
wheat in North Dakota will have been mar- 
keted by January 1. It is finding the ter- 
ritory to be very spotty, the poor districts 
knocking down the average to the disap- 
pointing basis given in the Government 
statement. Bad weather reduced country 
elevator receipts 65 to 70 ])er cent, in the last 
three days, but a rush of deliveries is antici; 
])ated with the resumption of threshing op- 
erations. 

Flaxseed makes a more favorable showing 
than spring wheat with an estimate of 68.4 
jjcr cent. com])ared with 48.3 i)er cent, in 
1010. 

The yield of the seed is placed by K. IL 
Smith, local manager of the .American Lin- 
seed Company, at 20,000,000 bushels for the 
three States, of which he considers over 
half, or ill the neighborhood of 11,000,000 
bushels, should find its way to this market. 
( )f the last crop only 3,307,354 bushels came 
here. 



GREAT LAKES IMPROVEMENTS. 



In a tentative form, the estimates for the 
War Department carry not quite $48,000,- 
000 for river and harbor improvements. The 
Great Lakes improvements are scheduled 
for large amounts. 

Despite the injunction from Beverly to 
keep down the appropriations, it is stated 
that Brigadier-General William Bixby, 
chief of engineers, has broken all records 
in outlining a river and harbor program for 
Congress at the next session. His recom- 
mendations appear to he a realization of the 
campaign of the river and harbor advocates 
for an annual $50,000,000 bill. 

It is understood that the officials in other 
departments think that the recommendations 
of the chief of engineers are out of all pro- 
portion as most of the departments are keep- 
ing their recommendations down to absolute 
maintenance basis and are not asking for 
any large extension of the business under 
their jurisdiction. 

One of the largest items in the estimate 
is for the new lock at the isoo. Unless the 
estimates are reduced the chief of engineers 
will ask for over $2,000,000 for this work. 
There will also be liberal a])propriations for 
.Xshtabtda and Lorain. Until President Taft 
has approved the total recommended by the 
chief of engineers, the details of the esti- 
mates will be kept secret by the War De- 
partment. 

Brigadier-General Bixby, chief of engi- 
neers, who has just retiirned from an in- 
spection of the Lake Erie ports, spent a 
couple of hours to-day going over the esti- 
mates with Acting Secretary of War Oliver 
and Major-General Wood, chief of staff. As 
he came from the conference. General Bix- 
by said : 

"You may be assured that the Great Lakes 
will be taken care of in our recommenda- 
tions. If it is decided to reduce our esti- 
mates the items for the Great Lakes will be 
among the last to be stricken out from my 
report. There is nothing like seeing the 
thing itself and my trip along Lake Erie 
lias impressed me with the importance of 
making ample appropriations of all the proj- 
ects. I am convinced that the new lock 
at the Soo should be completed as .soon as 
possible. I think that we will get at least 
$2,000,000 next year for this work. 

"Do not ask me to give figures until our 
estimates have been approved by the Presi- 
dent. My information is that we will soon 
be ready to go ahead with the Livingstone 
Channel. Canada moves slowly, but I think 
that we will soon receive a favorable report 
from there which will clear up the situa- 
tion." ' 



TWO SCHOONERS CHARTERED. 



The schooners Charles A\'all and Sophia 
Minch have been chartered for the balance 
of the season by Carbray, Son & Co., of 
Quebec. They will carry coal from Lake 
Ivrie ports to Montreal. 

The schooner Wall will be lowed by the 
steamer Hilda. The schooner Minch -nr- 
rived from Windsor recctitly in low of the 
titg Trotter. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL; 



SHIPBUILDING CONTRACTS. 



Lake shipbuilders are figuring on some 
new work and contracts for a few boats for 
special trades for delivery at the opening 
of next season may be closed. Bids for a 
steamer for the oil trade were opened at the 
ofifice of the Standard Oil Company in New 
York recently, but the contract will not be 
awarded until later. The American Ship- 
building Company and the Toledo Ship- 
building Company bid for the job. 

The new boat for the Standard "will be of 
Welland Canal size and will be practically 
a duplicate of the steamer Perfection, which 
was turned out at the local shipyard this 
season. She will have capacity for about 
800,000 gallons. 

The Eocene, the second steamer building 
for the Standard Oil Company, will be 
launched at the Cleveland yard a week from 
to-day. The American Shipbuilding Com- 
pany is also building five barges for the 
Standard, and in addition to the new boats 
the barge Antrim is being converted into 
an oil carrier at the Lorain yard. She will 
be ready for service in about ten days. 

A number of the new boats will be taken 
to the Coast before the close of navigation. 

The Lake builders may be called upon to 
submit bids for two steamers of Welland 
Canal size for a special trade. Plans for 
vessels of that class are being prepared and 
the deal may be closed before the close of 
the season. President Pessano, of the Great 
Lakes Engineering Works, of Detroit, who 
is in the East, has booked an order for a 
steamer for the Coast trade. The new boat 
will be a duplicate of the steamers which 
the Detroit firm built for the Harper Trans- 
])ortation Company, of Boston. 



BIG MONTH FOR LUMBER. 



The receipts of lumber at the Tonawan- 
das by vessel last month amounted to 56,- 
000,000 feet and exceeded the receipts for 
any month during the past five years. Last 
month's receipts brought the total for the 
season to date up to 179,000,000 feet, only 
6,000,000 feet less than was received during 
the same period of 1910. No other month 
this season has shown an increase over the 
corresponding month of last year. The 
amount of lumber to arrive at the Tona- 
wandas during August of last year was a 
trifle less than 50,000,000 feet. There is a 
large amount of lumber to come down the 
lakes to the Tonawandas during the re- 
mainder of the season, and it begins to look 
as though the predictions early in the sea- 
son that the year's receipts would fall far 
short of those of 1910 would not prove cor- 
rect. 



OLD CAPTAIN DEAD. 



Infirmities of advanced age brought death 
on September 8 to Captain George U. Wil- 
son, at the home of his daughter in Detroit. 
For thirty-six years he had sailed on fresh 
and salt water — in 1862 as master of the 
Arcadia and later on his own steamers, the 
A. A. Turner and Dubuque. 

For twenty-four years preceding January 
1 last, Captain Wilson had been in the em- 
ploy of the United States Custom service at 
Detroit. Although seventy-eight years old, 
he was able to read without glasses. Two 
daughters survive him. 



AWARDED $1,000 DAMAGES. 



In an action against the steamer Thomas 
Cranage of the Cranage Steamship Com- 
pany of Bay City, Mich., Judge John R. 
Hazel, in admiralty term of the United 
States District Court at Buffalo, awarded 
Henry Gilbert, a grain scooper, $1,000 for 
damages alleged to have been received on 
June 13, 1910'. 

According to the testimony given by wit- 
nesses, Gilbert was working in the hull of 
the vessel scooping grain into the leg of the 
elevator when a hatch cover, weighing more 
than 200 pounds, fell a distance of twenty- 
one feet, striking him on the back and hip. 
He says he was laid up five weeks. The 
judge allowed him $100 for loss of time and 
$900 damages for his injury. 



BOATS FOR THE COAST. 



The steamer Seaconnet and the barges 
Lynn and Providence, which loaded coal at 
Ashtabula, sailed for Montreal recently. 
The steamer F. J. Lisman and the barges 
Boston and Searsport, which will also go 
to the Coast, will be ready to leave Ecorse 
shortly. They will load coal at Ohio ports 
for Montreal. 

It will be late in the season when the last 
two boats of the fleet, the steamer Mary E. 
Harper and the barge Salem, are ready to 
go. The first tow, the steamer Penobscot 
and the barges Bangor and Portsmouth, 
sailed several weeks ago. 

The four steamers and seven barges will 
be operated on the Coast by the Harper 
Transportation Company, of Boston. 



BOAT CONTRACT CLOSED. 



Another package freight steamer for the 
Coast trade is to be built by the Great 
Lakes Engineering works of Detroit, says 
a dispatch from New York, which an- 
nounces that A. C. Pessano, president of 
the company, has just booked an order for a 
steel ship of the same size, design and equip- 
ment as the three package freighters for 
which he closed a contract last spring, and 
which will be built at the plant in Ecorse. 

It is understood the new vessel is des- 
tined for use in the Coast trade on the Pa- 
cific, and that it is to be delivered early next 
year. The identity of the purchaser is not 
yet made public. President Pessano is still 
in the East. 



GOING AFTER EXPOSED HULL. 



The forward part of the Moreland is still 
near Eagle River at Keweenaw Peninsula, 
where the vessel was wrecked. It is partly 
under water and has divided into two sec- 
tions, the midship part being 109 feet in 
length and the forward section 250 feet. The 
after section of th.c ship, containing the en- 
gines and boilers, was towed stern foremost 
and the forward end, with its heavy bulk- 
head of 16-inch timbers, sank low in the 
water, drawing twenty feet. This made it 
impossible to tow the wreck further than a 
l)oint 800 feet from the shore east of the 
canal inside the breakwater. Reid is con- 
centrating his energy on the forward part, 
the rest being in a safe position. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persua- 
ding seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas Reid, marine fireman, 4.S Assump- 
tion street, Detroit, Mich., is inquired for by 

his mother. 



Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



The barge D. P. Rhodes, one of the nu- 
merous lumber hookers engaged in carry- 
ing stock from upper Lake ports to the 
Tonawandas, was sold at North Tonawanda 
on vSeptejnber 8 under a libel action brought 
by John Conley, a Bufifalo ship chandler. 



Demand the union label on all products! 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY, 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

tJnion of America.) 
570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
Telephone, Franklin 278. 
BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY. Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

ERIE, Pa 107 E. Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 

HURON, O Lake Seamen's Union 

MARINE CITY, Mich P. O. Box 773 

PORT HURON, Mich 517 Water Street 

KINGSTON, Ont Box 96 

HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wla. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Safflnaw, Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Mich. Shoboygan. Wl.s. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludlngton. Mich. Superior, Wla. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WHALING IN SOUTH PACIFIC. 



The Marine Department of New Zealand 
has just granted concessions to a Norwe- 
gian whaling company to make use of one 
or more ports in the Auckland Islands, 
Stewart Island, Chatham, and Bay of Is- 
lands. It is anticipated that the industry 
will give employment to over 200 men. 

The Bluff, in the South Island of New 
Zealand, will be the headquarters of the in- 
tended operations. The vessels to be ap- 
portioned to New Zealand are at present in 
active operation off the South African 
coast, and consist of a large steamer of 
5,000 tons and two auxiliary steamers. A 
project is also on foot to establish the whal- 
ing industry in Akaroa Harbor, near Lyt- 
telton, in the South Island, where whales at 
present are sighted daily. A meeting has 
been called for the organization of a local 
company to undertake this project. 

Previous to securing the concessions 
from the New Zealand Government a rep- 
resentative of the Norwegian company was 
quoted as follows by the Otago Times : 

The company already has three stations in 
southern waters, at Durban in Cape Colony, and 
at the islands of South Georgia and South Shet- 
land, to the south of Cape Colony. Operations 
liave been carried on there with much success 
for some years. The whales are chased in long 
boats driven by steam, and when secured are 
towed to a harbor where, on board a vessel fitted 
for the purpose, the oil is tried out, portions of 
the carcass transformed into animal food, and 
the remainder made into fertilizers. In New 
Zeal.md a vessel of 2,000 tons would suffice for 
all purposes; this vessel the company would send 
out from Norway with practical men aboard. Tn 
South .African waters most of the whales caught 
are of the humpback variety, the oil of which is 
sent to Glasgow, which is the chief market. The 
fodder and fertilizer arc sold to South African 
farmers, who would take more if we had it to 
supply them. A considerable amount of British 
capital is invested in the company in South Afri- 
ca, and it is proposed to invite New Zealand res- 
idents to take a monetary interest. The system 
proposed to be introduced into New Zealand has 
been in use in .\^orway for about 25 years. It 
would include boats 100 feet long fitted with 
steam engines and capable of traveling 10 or 12 
miles an hour, the whales being shot at with 
harpoons from a gun in the bow. 

A Hobart newspaper states that this 
same company is asking the Tasmanian 
Government to grant it concessions at two 
ports — Port Davey, on the south coast, and 
one on the east coast at a point yet to be 
fixed — for a term of 20 years. 

The possibility of turning whales to good 
commercial account, with equipment which 
would permit of far more success than in 
the old days of sailing ships, has for the last 
two years been given much attention in 
New Zealand. Last year a first-class whal- 
er, built in England, arrived at Auckland, 
and is now engaged in operations around 
the coasts of New Zealand, the .Auckland 
Islands, Campbell Islands, etc. The ton- 
nage and dimensions are 127 tons gross and 
44 tons net register, 93 feet over all, by 19 
feet beam. It is fitted with the most mod- 
ern appliances, including a harpoon gun at 
the bow. 

South of the Bay of Islands in New Zea- 
land, at Wangamumu (where there is a 
landlocked harbor), near Cape Brett, some 
interesting operations have recently been 
carried on of catching whales by means of 
huge nets stretching 500 or 600 feet with a 
depth of 200 feet, meshed to 7 feet, made of 
3-inch wire rope hung on strong wire cables 
and buoyed by huge floats. These nets close 
the channel, the ends slightly overlapping 
each other. The object of the nets is to 
hamper the whale so that it falls an easy 
prey to the crews of whaleboats which are 



near at hand. The whales caught in this 
manner are usually the humpback and 
sulphur-bottom varieties and sometimes 
sperm whales. 

The whales caught off New Zealand yield 
on an average 60 to 100 barrels of oil per 
whale. The oil and other products from 
the whale are all sold locally. The oil is 
much used in the rope factories of New 
Zealand, as it keeps the fibers from separa- 
ting or becoming decomposed in salt water; 
it is also used for making candles and soap. 

It is said that there are now more whales 
off the coast of Tasmania and New Zealand 
than there were even during the period 
about 30 years ago, when nuinbers of 
American ships hunted in these waters. At 
that time Hobart, in Tasmania, was the 
chief center of- the industry. Until about 
1890 scores of ships set out from Hobart in 
quest of whales, sperm oil at that time 
ranging from $400 to $500 per ton. But 
with the discovery and development of the 
American oil wells the price dropped to 
$200 per ton, and then to $100. The indus- 
try then ceased to pay and became entirely 
extinct about Tasmania. The coopering 
trade and shipwrighting at Hobart also de- 
clined. An American steam whaler put into 
Hobart some 20 years ago for repairs, and 
this was the last boat to call in connection 
with this industry. 

Several months ago a school of 37 whales 
was washed up and stranded on the north- 
western coast of Tasmania. A company 
was quickly organized at Launceston to take 
advantage of this curious accident, but by 
the time the company was in a position to 
take care of the carcasses most of the oil 
had escaped. The venture, however, paid 
its promoters, as ambergris to the value of 
about $40,000 was obtained. 

At Eden, in New South Wales, interest- 
ing whaling operations are carried on at 
the present time with the assistance of 
"killer" whales, a species of whale not un- 
like a porpoise. They have fins some 6 feet 
in height set in the back. When any large 
whales are about a number of killers will 
surround them and drive them toward the 
shore, where they are observed by the 
whalers, who come upon the scene and dis- 
patch the whales with harpoon guns. The 
tongues of the whales are thrown out to the 
killers by the whalers. The dead whales 
are then hauled ashore, where the blubber 
is stripped off and the oil extracted. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



CASPIAN SEA FISHERIES. 



The fisheries of the Caspian Sea are di- 
vided into plots, most of which are let out 
by the Government at auctions. This year 
a combine was formed by two firms, who 
bid enormous prices and obtained practi- 
cally two-thirds of the fisheries. This has 
greatly altered the entire condition of the 
industry; whereas formerly there were a 
number of small owners all selling against 
each other, and often forced to sell imme- 
diately at very low prices on account of 
their inability to hold stocks, the business 
will now be in the hands of large owners, 
who are beginning to build refrigerating 
storage where the fish will be kept and the 
price regulated. It is considered that this 
will have a very widespread effect on the 
industry, and in all probability a syndicate 
or combine of all the Caspian fisheries will 
be formed to regulate prices and output. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the .American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. .Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal .Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEIM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 Bast St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 165 Cordova St.. West. P. O. 
Box 1365. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore., 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

EUREKA. Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND. Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

Sj\N PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

L.\ CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION, 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA. Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Cnii \<c procurf'd by se.inipn at 
.my of thf above-mentioned pl.aces; 
Mlso .It tlie hpadqunrters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



and women who have been in the postal 
service for years and have grown old in 
the service. 

The desire of the Postmaster-General to 
provide for aged postoffice employes has 
received stimulus by the dismissal of Daniel 
Rooney and Andrew Hyde by Postmaster 
]\forgan of New York. Both had served for 
many years in the New York City post- 
office and were dismissed some time ago by 
the postmaster because he became con- 
vinced that their age impaired their future 
usefulness. 



What the Trusts Have Done. 
When the great Civil War was raging and 
thousands of men were engaged in the 
mighty conflict; when the shop, the mill, 
the mine and the fields were depopulated to 
such an extent that laborers Avere few, the 
prices of the commodities of life increased. 
To-day we are at peace, the machinery in 
the shop and mill is tended by thousands 
of willing workers, the miner digs indus- 
triously and skilled husbandmen are tilling 
the soil and gathering abundant harvests. 
Nevertheless, the prices of the products of 
the shop, the mill, the mine and the field 
are soaring. The following table of prices 
is taken from the Times-Dispatch, Rich- 
mond, Va. The war time prices are from 
the Index-Appeal, a reliable authority on 
the Civil War: 

Now. 



War Time. Article 

$4.10 Flour 

14 cents pound Pork 

'% cents pound Hams 

S-12 cents pound Ijard 

15-20 cents pound Butter 

14 cents pound Cheese 

10-lS cents pound Sugar 

.30-35 cents gal. Molasses 

fiV4 cents pound Beef 



$7.75 

18-20 cents pound 
20-28 cents pound 
12% cents pound 
30-35 cents pound 
35 cents pound 
6-7 cents pound 
32-38 cents gal. 
15 cents pound 



5 cents pound Slioulders 20 cents pound 

13-16 cents pound Coffee 25-40 cents pound 

The trusts are responsible for the prices 
now', and the same trusts are giving battle 
to the unions in their efifort to increase 
wages. 



Unions Gain in Britain. 

As a result of the recent strikes in Great 
Britain, thousands of new members have 
been gained by the unions. Harry Gosling, 
the representative of the London Transport 
W^orkers, has issued a statement to the ef- 
fect that 8.S,000 workers have joined the 
respective unions connected with the Fed- 
eration in that city. He also states that 
advances in wages of from 10 to 33 per 
cent, have been secured by carmen, seamen, 
dockers, coal porters, etc., and that the hours 
of labor were reduced by from 8 to 25 per 
cent. 

At Liverpool more than 25,000 new mem- 
bers were gained by the Transport Work- 
ers' Association and wages have been in- 
creased 20 per cent. At Hull, Glasgow, Bris- 
tol, Cardiff, Swansea and Newport similar 
triumphant results have been obtained. 



Attempt to Nullify Prison Law. 

The case of the Hoge-Montgomery Com- 
pany vs. Charles L. Daugherty as Commis- 
sioner of Labor was heard by Judge Cotterel 
of the United States Circuit Court at Okla- 
homa City recently. This case involves the 
constitutionality of the Oklahoma statute, 
passed two years ago, requiring that all 
convict-made oQods be branded or marked 
before being ofl'erctl for sale in the State. 

The Commissioner of I^abor notified all 
dealers of the provisions of the statute and 



warned them that prosecutions would follow 
in cases of violation. 

The Hoge-Montgomery Company, which 
manufactures shoes in the Kentucky peni- 
tentiary at Frankfort, having a contract for 
the labor of about 800 convicts, thereupon 
prayed for an injunction to restrain the 
Commissioner from proceeding with the en- 
forcement of the law, on the ground that the 
statute was an infringement on the jurisdic- 
tion of the National Government over inter- 
state commerce. The argument before 
Judge Cotterel was on a motion to make the 
injunction permanent. 



Getting Wise. 

The efifort of Canadian employers to de- 
stroy the labor movement by instilling na- 
tional prejudice into the minds of the work- 
ers, has failed. The Vancouver World is 
authority for the statement that "the few 
straggling locals masquerading under the 
title of the Canadian Federation of Labor, 
and better known to international unionists 
as the 'nationalists,' are gradually dropping 
their affiliation with the per capita-tax-dodg- 
ers, and lining up with the wide-world trade 
organizations of the working class. There 
isn't enough of them to hold a funeral this 
year, let alone a convention." 



A Union-Built Battleship. 

Work on Uncle Sam's greatest and latest 
dreadnought, the battleship New York, has 
been begun. The vessel will be built in the 
Brooklyn Navy Yard and will, when com- 
pleted, be another tribute to the skill of or- 
ganized labor. 

The plan to build the dreadnought in a 
Government yard has met with considerable 
opposition. It was asserted that the vessel 
could not be built on the original amount 
appropriated for that purpose on account of 
the eight-hour day in operation in Govern- 
ment plants. The appropriation was in- 
creased, however, and the battleship will be 
built by the Government. 

Before work was begun it was found 
necessary to take ofif a piece of a corner of 
a building, in order that the ways might be 
lengfthened. 



Will Not Adopt Taylor Sj'stem. 

The action of the members of labor or- 
ganizations employed in Navy Yards, in 
resolving to resist the introduction of the 
Taylor system, has brought forth a state- 
ment from Acting Secretary of the Navy 
Winthrop to the eflfect that there has been 
no attempt inade to introduce the system, 
and that it is not likely to be adopted for 
Naval uses. He admits that a board of 
Naval officers has been for several months 
studying Navy- Yard methods with a view 
to their improvement along other lines. 

Representatives of the I. A. of M., how- 
ever, are determined to be prepared for ac- 
tion should it become necessary, and a con- 
ference of workmen to devise plans to op- 
pose the scientific system of shop manage- 
ment has been called and will be held in 
Rock island, 111., beginning September 19. 
Officers of the oiganizalion and delegates 
from various machinists' lodges composed of 
Navy Yard and arsenal workers will altend 
the conference. 

The convention of the International Asso- 
ciation of Machinists will open in Daven- 
])ort, Iowa, on Monday, Septemebr 18, and 
the result of the conference will be sub- 
mitted to the delegation for their approval. 



English Eight-Hour Movement. 

The executive committee of the 18 fed- 
erated unions governing the shipbuilding 
trades, have approved the movement for 
an eight-hour day. It is said the matter 
will be discussed at the next meeting of 
the federated executives and that the out- 
come of this meeting will be the almost 
unanimous backing of the demand for an 
eight-hour day. 

A similar agitation is reported in the steel 
trade. The members of the British Steel 
Smelters' Union have voted largely in favor 
of a move for the eight-hour day, and the 
officials of the union have asked for a con- 
ference with the employers to discuss the 
demand. 



May Call General Strike. 

At the annual conference of the Miners' 
Federation of Great Britain, which will be 
held at Southport in the first week of Oc- 
tober, the Lancashire and Cheshire Federa- 
tion will present a resolution demanding the 
establishment of a minimum wage scale for 
miners. The resolution will also call for a 
general strike to enforce the demands, if 
necessary. The Lancashire and Cheshire 
coal fields employ over 100,000 miners. 



Mammoth Loaves. 
A loaf of bread 16 feet long, said to be 
the largest one ever baked, was a feature 
in Pittsburg's Labor Day Parade. It was 
the handiwork of members of Local No. 
12 of the Bakers' Union and was carried 
by six of the members. Local No. 44 of 
the same union exhibited an equally big 
loaf. It weighed 200 pounds and was 
drawn in a wagon by a pony. Both loaves 
were decorated with the union label. 



Gompers Talks With McNamaras. 

The McNamara brothers saw and talked 
with President Gompers of the A. F. of L. 
on September 11. Accompanied by Clar- 
ence Darrow and Joseph Scott, attorneys for 
the McNamaras, the labor chief called at the 
county jail and held a conference with the 
imprisoned men. 



A NEW LIFE PRESERVER. 



A new life preserver, which has been suc- 
cessfully tried, may be introduced into the 
German Navy. The apparatus, which 
weighs 5y2 pounds, consists of two swim- 
ming cushions bound together by straps. 
The cushions lie upon the breast and back. 
The apparatus is provided with a small 
lamp fed by a battery. The lamp can be 
fastened around the head with a band worn 
on the forehead, so that in an accident at 
night the position of the person in the 
water can be seen at a considerable dis- 
tance. The small electrical lamp burns 3 
to 4 hours and, with a reflector added, 
throws the light several hundred yards at 
night. In several recent tests of life-saving 
at night the victims of the supposed ship- 
wreck, by aid of the lamp, have been easily 
discovered. The life preserver can be 
buckled around the body in 5 seconds. The 
lamp begins to shine as soon as the buckle 
is fastened. In case of catastrophies to 
warships the worth of the life preserver can 
not be overestimated, though in case of 
war its use would not be advisable. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Domestic and Naval. 



The Chinese warship Ilai Chi ar- 
rived at New York on September 11. 
This is the first Chinese warship to 
enter American waters. 

.\ school of aerial navigation will 
he opened at the Mare Island (Cal.) 
Navy Yard, according to the present 
plans of the Navy Department. 

The French bank Mathilde, which 
recently went ashore at Canso, will 
become a total loss, according to ad- 
vices reaching Lloyd's from Halifax. 

Fourteen men were drowned in the 
sinking of the schooner Whisper ofT 
the Nicaraguan coast on September 
10. The disaster was caused by fire 
and an explosion of gasoline. 

The Haniburg-.\mcrican liner Kai- 
serin Auguste Victoria was in col- 
lision at Cuxhaven on September 9 
with the German steamer Hudiksvall. 
Several plates on the Kaiserin Au- 
guste Victoria were smashed. 

Thousands of tons of coal went up 
in smoke when the coal wharves and 
pockets for the Bachelder Brothers 
and the F. C. Warren Coal Company 
in South Boston were destroyed by 
fire on September 13. The total loss 
was $75,000. 

The British steamer lluelva of 
Philadelphia, from Huelva. reports 
having passed on August 29 in lati- 
tude 36.04 north, longitude 30.17 west, 
a derelict, bottom up, painted red, par- 
tially submerged and showing SO or 
60 feet of keel 4 feet above water. 

V. Danask. a water-tender on the 
United States crui.ser Maryland, was 
decorated with the medal and diploma 
of the Italian Red Cross at Vallejo. 
Cal., on September 24. Danask is a 
native of Greece, and in the earth- 
quake at Messina, Italy, performed 
heroic feats of bravery and saved 
many lives. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 115 sail and steam vessels of 
17,499 gross tons were built in the 
United States during August, 1911. 
The largest steel steam vessel in- 
cluded in these figures is the Har- 
vester, of 7188 gross tons, built at 
Lorain, Ohio, for the American 
Ship Building Company. 

The arrival of the steamship Thel- 
ma at Philadelphia on September 13 
with a cargo of cryolite, from Ivigtut. 
Greenland, is regarded by shipping 
men as conclusive proof of the value 
of steamships in this trade. The pass- 
age from Greenland was made in nine 
and one-half days. Sailing vessels 
usually require from 30 to 40 days to 
make the passage. 

The arrival at New York of the 
new American Dreadnought Utah, to 
join her sister-ship, the Dreadnought 
Florida, now nearing completion at 
the Brooklyn Navy Yard, again sets 
the scales in motion of the relative 
position of American sea fighters as 
compared with the navies of the oth- 
er great powers. The Utah and Flori- 
da are the most powerful battleships 
now in commission. 

.Although the United States Dread- 
noughts Florida and Utah are the 
largest vessels in the Navy, they will 
be manned by smaller crews than 
many other American battleships. The 
complement of each of the new ships 
will be 824 sailors and 66 marines, 
exclusive of officers. Naval experts 
say this is because the batteries of 
the new dreadnoughts are more 
homogeneous and consequently re- 
quire fewer men to man them. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

When in port come up and give us a trial. 
The newest 25-cent house in town. 
New building, new furniture. 
Special attention to mariners. 



FREE BATHS 



Special Weekly 
Rates 



J. H. KLINE, Prop. 



Residenc-; Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 
Mate's and Pilot's License of all 
grades. Ocean, coast and inland 
waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. E. SNELLENBERG, 

Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses. 333 Globe Bldg., First 
Ave. and Madison St., Seattle, Wash 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



^^^J*^S^S^\^*,^^%/^^1,^S^K^>i^<>^*i^>>^>'^Si^^^>^i^S^il^^l^^>l^1^>^i^<^^*^ 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 



•> 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

>. ,<tx Candidates for Mas- 

^ir.- ters' and Mates' Ocean 

-^•.'4'^-- r, — m or Coast Licenses of 
L ^7w all Grades are In- 

structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation In all Us 
Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation In a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master. Unlimited; 
PiiKet Sound and Alaska Pilot: Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave. SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



At 



WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 
220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Blocl<, Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, WoMh., Letter List. ^y work is My Best Advertisement 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofllce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 



Andersen, K. E. 
Andersen, J. G. 

-1534 
liertelsen, Alf. 
Boe, E. L. 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlson, C. E. 
Dahlgren, A. 
Derdio, F. 
Dennett, J. 
Deli. Herman 
Elwood, J. 
Ellison, Chas. 
Ellifson, Otto 
Klsted, J. 
Erikson, A. -1732 
Erikson, O. -606 
Erikson, Fridbjof 
Erikson, Aug. 
Eugene, J. 
Eager, J. 
Farnan, W. L. 
Fellix, P. 
Felix, L. 
Feeley, T. 
Fjelstad, K. M. 
Franzell, A. 
Garbers, G. 
Hansen, C. J. -967 
Hansen, C. -1476 
Hansen. Harold O. 
Haak, C. 
Haga, A. A. 
Hansen, Harald 
Herman, Axel 
Henrikson, H. -1773 
Holmstrom, C. A. 
Hoim, H. P. 
Iver&on, Iver 
Ingebretsen, Olaf 
JackUn, C. 



Jacobson. Jolin 
Jensen, H. -1141 
Jensen, John 
Jensen, 11. -2014 
Johansen, Ludvig 
Johanson, Olaf K. 
Johanson, Aug. W. 

-313 
Johanson, O. W. 

-139 
Johnson, John N. 
Johnson, Alf. -1700 
Johnson, Alex. 
Kalning. Jacob 
Karell, J. H. 
Kenny, J. 
Kittelson, C. T. 
Kiesow, P. 
Kirst, H. 
Knappe, Adolf 
Koptze, C. 
Kerwin, W. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kreutz, Karl 
Kroon, Z. 
Larsen, Alfred 
Lathi, J. H. 
Larsen, C. H. 
Lorln, K. 
Lundquist. John 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olson, O. P. 
Olsen, Bvor 
Olsen, J. H. 
Olsen. Oscar 
Olssen, Frank 
Olsen, Erik 
Ommundsen. T. 
Osterberg, Gust. 
Paul, P. G. 
Peterson, Axel -1223 



W. H. MIDDLETON 

TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, Cutter 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In Every 

Garment 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three doors south of James, SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Halvor Eugene Krogstad, a native 
of Christiania, Norway, is inquired for 
by S. Krogstad, 853 Savier St., Port- 
land, Or. 



Peterson, C. V. -644 Scliafer, P. 

Petterson, O. -710 Satto, S. 

Peterson, E. -668 Stor, W. T. 

Reime, T. Suoininen, Alex. 

Keitiink, H. Swenson, L. G. 

Reinhold, A. Swan-^on, Gus 

Uuunak, H. Stor, W. 

Soetveit, J. Thocke, E . 

Saar, J. 'I'oilofsen, Andrew 

Saniueisen, A. R. 'J'ergorsen, Kasper 

-732 Turner, T. 

Scott, Alf. Wilde, H. 

Scarabosio, M. Zechel, W. 

Schultz, Wm. Zwahlen, R. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

Brewed by 
HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLI-F KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second Street 



Eureka, Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Bror Utter, a native of Bornhus, 
Gefle, Sweden, last heard from in 
New York, in 1905, is inquired for by 
his parents. Address, Maskinisten 
Utter, Bornhus, Sweden. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: 

Gust Leyrle, arrived at Philadelphia, 
October 2, 1908, on ship Dirigo. 

Gustav Mattson and Victor Wilson, 
on schooner Charles Davenport. 
March, 1911. 

John McCauley, whose brother 
Cyrus McCauley (late of barge Har- 
risburgh) died in Marine Hospital, 
Philadelphia, on May 17, 1911. 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 
Groceries and Notions 

We sell everything, and sell at right 

prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 
You Know the Place 

320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen 

Trade with JUKKA SAHLSTEIN. 

New store. Everything is new and sold 
at right prices. 304 South F St., near 
Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen, Wash. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 

GO TO THE 



Union Cigar Store 

For Your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

^^l^^SHTsimvE^^ 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the U^liPP^^SSSi 



PEOPLES MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEGE- 
TABLES. Shipping supplied at lowest 
rates. Port Townsend, Wash. 



Ch^frT^P^aggrMgrChaTETco^ Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, P?jl,jr°;^;;J35t!liwv^ 



Waterman ® Katz 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Complete stock of Ship Candlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen s Sup- 
plies and Outfits, Etc., Etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Rasmus Christian Sorensen, born 
July 13, 1876, on Birkum Mark, 
Fyen, Denmark. It is claimed that 
Mr. Sorensen may have been drowned 
on this coast about three years ago. 

Carl Victor Norrgrann, alias Smith, 
a native of Finland, born Aug. 24, 
1860, supposed to be on the Pacific 
Coast, is inquired for by his sister. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
v^'hich you are served. 



<stpTT88o3^ 

Issued b/ AuUioiity of tne Cigar MaKers' International Union o( America. 

Union-made Cigars 

Shi^ Sntif if;^. Trm Uk Cbljn cooalncd InUilj Vn lun beHi mKll bya llCt-CbSS Wxlflai 

3llClllfKOrTH[CKAflMMEI<l'IIIT[J)IUTIOHU.UtllOllc<Al»riu. M oiiiiiatlotllevotei) tgtfvad. 
wnnmciil al tlic UODAlMAIlKIAlaiul mlEUiailU WlllAJU. OF THC OWT. ItaitionmiKoaai 

UeSA CutiTi to all SltxAefS IhURNTWUt th« MorliJ 

' AlllarTuigwaMtauponthuLaUJwiJbepunisM KCad^toUm 



F»C 
' SIMILE 



" curu.f 



^-l<!f^'^k^>»Si(<^^K,tgUdiStg>y.^M^<i^^JMM^-&U^^ 



VOLUME XXIII 

OF THE 

COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Bound in Cloth and Thoroughly Indexed 



FOR SALE TO MARITIME UNIONS AT 
$2.00 PER VOLUME (Expressage Extra) 



Also a limited number of Volumes XVII to XXII. 

Address : Business Manager, 44-46 East Street, San Francisco, 



California. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H.TliiALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hal! 2320 N. 30th Street, Old Town 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WorKingmen's Store 

Importer and Dealer In 
Fine Custom and Ready-Made Clothing 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Clothing, 
Trunks, Valises, Etc. 

ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

23 N. Third Street Near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

Wanted 

By the United States Bureau of Labor, 
Washington, D. C, the following num- 
bers of the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 
Volumes 1 to 4 
Volume 5, Nos. 2,20, 22, 27, 30 
Volume 6, Nos. 14, 17, 20, 31, 
45, 46, 48 

Anyone having any of the numbers 
indicated above will please communi- 
cate with the United States Bureau of 
Labor, Washington, D. C. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 




INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the address of 
Thos. Symington, age 59, last heard 
from in Seattle, Wash,, 1908, will 
please communicate with John Sym- 
ington, 674 West Madison street, 
Chicago, 111. 

MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 



Seattle, Wash. 



Areas, Chas. 
Barbo, M. 
Barnett, H. 
Bergstrom, F. 
Bradley, A. J. 
Bushby, Mr. 
Bonnell, H. 
Brown, F. C. 
Brownlee, Tom 
Connolly, Tom 
Chivers, L. 
Engstrom, Swan 
Flores, Augstlne 
Grace, Richard 
Glradelli, A. 
Hanlon, Jack 
Hedger, A. 
Laugan, Jas. 
Law, Willie 
Lawson. John 
Llssen, Dick 
Ma«e«. Hanry 



Morris, Ernest 
Morgan, H. B. 
Morgan, L. 
Morris, John 
Moyes, Andrew 
Murphy. E. M. 
McCall. Wm. 
O'Farrell, Jas. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Parrott, I. 
Pierce, Claude 
Stacey, Frank 
Stollery, Joe 
Stevens. Jas. 
Stevenson. J. 
Tlllbury. H. 
Tinoco, Joe 
Taylor, W. 
Vanhear, Jas. 
Van Ermen, H. 
Welsh, J. G. 
WattB, ChM. 



The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Building, San Francisco, wants for 
the relatives in question, information 
regarding: 

Carl Jensen, born March 13, 1877, 
in Troelstrup, near Haslev, Denmark. 
Mr. Jensen has been a member of the 
Sailors' Union and was in 1907 on 
board the schooner Henry Nelson. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Carl Sofus Frandzen, born in Co- 
penhagen, February 11, 1881. Left 
Denmark in 1901; employed in United 
States Navy, 1902. His father wants 
to get into communication. 

Jesper Christian Jespersen, who has 
been a member of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific up to 1900. Has been 
employed on various life-saving sta- 
tions on the Pacific Coast and later 
on sailed a scow on the San Fran- 
cisco Bay. His brother in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

George Ulrich Rune, whose ad- 
dress in 1909 was care of Sailors' 
Union Hall, Tacoma, Wash. His 
father in Denmark wants to get in 
communication with him. 

William Ernst Ludvig Hansen, 
called W. E. Hansen, a native of Co- 
penhagen, Denmark. Mr. Hansen was 
in 1907 in the employ of the Alaska 
Packers' Association at Karluk, Alas- 
ka. Since then nothing has been 
heard of him. His sister in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

Victor Gronross, a native of Fin- 
land, aged about 24, is inquired for 
by D. E. Shutts, 1110 Ashbury St., 
San Francisco. 

Jens Peder Lauritz Pedersen, ma- 
rine engineer and fireman, born in 
Dalby, near Thureby, Denmark, April 
14, 1878, and supposed to have ar- 
rived in San Francisco in the winter 
of 1907-8, is inquired for by the Da- 
nish Consulate, 815 Mills P.lug., San 
Francisco, Cal. 



The republic of Portugal was for- 
mally recognized on September 1 1 by 
Great Britain, Spain, Germany, Italy 
and Austria. 

A rice famine threatens the Philip- 
pine. The price already is above all 
previous records and is advancing 
rapidly. 

A gun on the French armored cruis- 
er Gloirc hurst at Toulon on Sei)tcm- 
hcr 20 and ihirteen members of the 
crew were injured. 

The river of lava from Mount 
Etna is still advancing, sweeping all 
l)cforc it. Thousands of people have 
been driven from their homes. 

The Russian Premier, R. A. Stoly- 
pin, was shot while attending the 
opera at Kiev on September 14. He 
died in great agony. 

Mount Etna is showing a revival of 
activity. Two new craters have 
opened about 8000 feet above the sea 
level. A cloud of smoke is visible and 
ashes are erupted continuously. 

The likelihood of an extencd fam- 
ine has led Indo-China and Siam to 
prohibit the exportation of rice, and 
a similar measure of self-protection 
is expected from Rangoon. 

David Starr Jordan, President of 
Leland Stanford Jr. University, of 
California, was received in audience 
by the Mikado on February 16. The 
Mikado decorated his visitor. 

The whole Ottoman Empire is in 
the grip of the cholera and deaths 
will be numbered in the thousands, 
though the failure of any attempt to 
keep official records makes even an 
approximate estimate impossible. 

Eight men were killed and sixteen 
injured when the State guards fired 
into a special train of excursionists 
coming to join in the manifestation 
to Francisco I. Madero, at Meridia, 
Yucatan, on September 12. 

The regular official statement is- 
sued by the Italian Government on 
the cholera situation shows that from 
August 27 to September 2, inclusive, 
there were 1466 cases of the disease 
in the country and 657 deaths. 

It is now said that Germany has 
the fastest warship in the world. The 
new Dreadnought cruiser Moltke is 
credited with a speed of twenty-nine 
and a half knots on her trials. The 
Moltke is a ship of 23,000 tons and 
80,000 horse-power. 

The Japanese Minister of luluca- 
tion has announced that two new im- 
perial universities, accommodating 
1000 students, will be opened. One 
will be located at Sendai, on the 
eastern coast of the main island, and 
the other at Fukuoka, on the Island 
of Kiushu. 

A Chinese imperial edict issued on 
September 15 admits that the situa- 
tion in the province of Szcchucn is 
dangerous, and orders Tsen Cliun- 
Suan to proceed thither immediately. 
He formerly was Viceroy of Sze- 
cluien and Kwang Tung, and has the 
reputation of being a ruthless sup- 
presser of rebellion. 

The Japanese Government has de- 
cided to abandon the naval station at 
Port Arthur, in Manchuria, represent- 
ing an investment of many millions 
of dollars. As much of the material 
as can be used elsewhere will be 
transferred to the new site selected at 
Chinhai Bay, on the coast of Korea, a 
position that will command the en- 
trance to the Yellow Sea and the Gulf 
of Presilli, as well as afford protec- 
tion to the western coast of Japan 
and the Straits of Korea. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The last School Census showed 
20.000,000 enrolled in the various in- 
stitutions of the United States. It is 
estimated that the common schools 
alone now have at least 18,000,000 
pupils. 

The stock market in New York was 
overwhelmed on September 22 by a 
wild outburst of selling caused by 
alarm at the reports of approaching 
dissolution of the United States Steel 
Corporation. 

A strong earthquake shock was felt 
in the Prince William Sound country 
of Alaska on September 20, but its 
extent can not be learned because 
the earthquake severed the cable con- 
necting Sitka and Valdez. 

The citizens of California will vote 
on Woman Suffrage, Initiative and 
Referendum, Recall, Workmen's Com- 
pensation and other proposed amend- 
ments to the State Constitution at a 
special election to be held on Octo- 
ber 10. 

Work was begun on September 18 
on the construction of an auxiliary 
channel of the Chicago sanitary canal 
designed to drain the Calumet dis- 
trict. The new canal will be 116 feet 
wide, 23 feet deep. 16 miles long and 
cost $10,000,000. 

United States Circuit Judge Peter 
S. Grosscup, of Chicago, on Septem- 
ber 19 announced that he would re- 
tire from the bench. Judge Grosscup 
has served nineteen years as a mem- 
ber of the Federal judiciary in the 
Northern district of Illinois. 

The Canadian election on Septem- 
ber 21 resulted in an overwhelming 
defeat for Reciprocity. A Liberal 
majority of forty-three was converted 
into a Conservative majority of near- 
ly fifty. It is said that Premier 
Laurier will retire from public life. 

It was reported on September 21 
that the matter of dissolving and re- 
organizing the United States Steel 
Corporation is receiving the earnest 
attention of the Department of Jus- 
tice and the legal representatives of 
the so-called "billion-dollar trust." 

The completion of Canada's fifth 
census, begun in June, will show a 
total population considerably under 
8,000,000, according to unofficial cal- 
culations. The ofificial figures will be 
made public as soon as the returns are 
in from the Northwest districts. 

The most important development 
in the recent negro lynching case at 
Coatesville, Pa., on September 20, 
came when warrants charging two 
members of the mob with murder and 
two policemen with involuntary man- 
slaughter were issued. 

Whirling about in midair, his body 
a flaming torch, Frank Miller, a 
Cleveland aviator, was burned to 
death and dropped to the ground, 
charred and lifeless, in the sight of 
thousands of spectators at the Miami 
County Fair at Troy, Ohio, on Sep- 
tember 22. 

The international conference of 
labor commissioners and factory in- 
spectors of the United States and 
Canada opened its annual meeting at 
Lincoln, Neb., on September 18. 
About thirty States and Canadian 
provinces are represeiTted, including 
California, Nova Scotia and Quebec. 

Obediah Gardner of Rockland, Me., 
was appointed United States Senator 
on September 23 to succeed the late 
William P. Frye. Gardner was Dem- 
ocratic candidate for Governor of 
Maine in 1906. Maine is now repre- 
sented in the Senate by two Demo- 
crats. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at Uie expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall Is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Adolfson. G. 
Ahloff, W. 
Albertson, Chris 
.Msager, Chr. 
Alin, Gustav 
Amundsen, Albert 
Andersen, Aksel 
Andersen, Otto 
Andersen, Peder 
Andersen, Nils 
Andersen, Andrew 
Andersen, C. 
Ander.scn, Peter 
Anderson, E. B. 
.Anderson, August 
Anderson, Henry 
.\nUerson, Ole 
Baardsen, S. 
B;uirdsen, T. 
Backlund, John 
Baardsen, Georye 
Back, E. E. 
Baisleux, M. 
Balda, Alfonse 
Barwa. D. 
Barney, Chas. 
Bau, Martin 
Bauke, H. 
Baunian, Chas. 
Bausback, E. 
Beach, Fred S. 
Boausang, E. 
Beck. Edward 
Beckwith, Geo. 
Bel in v, Oscar 
Bentin. Billy 
Bengtson, Carl J. 
Benson, Fred. 
Benson, J. 
Bentzen, Bent 
Berg, H. J. 
Bergstrom, Paaso 
Berlin, Adolph 
Cafferty, John 
Cainan, Geo. T. 
Chamberlain, L. C. 
Carlsen, Kasmus 
Carlson, G. 
Carlson, Chas. 
Carlson, F. 
Carlson, Mr. 
Carlson, Oscar 
Carlson, T. 
Caspersen, Chris 
Causen, Jorgen 
Ceelan, John 
Christenson, Anton 
Christiansen, Fred. 
Christensen, E. H. 
Dahler, Peter 
Dahler, H. N. 
Uanielsen, John 
Day. H. E. 
Deans, Taft 
De Baere, H. 
Deegan, John 
Uiller, Edw. 
Edwards, S. 
Edwards, Walter 
Egeland, O. O. 
Egelhoff, Fred 
Kkwall, Gust. A. 
EUingsen, F. 
EUasen, Chas. 
Ellis, W. W. 
Ellison, Chas. 
Endresen, B. -673 
Engdahl, F. 
Engstrom, M. R. 
Ennls, R. 
Feigen, Johan 
Finck, John 
Fischer, Wilhelm 
l-'isher. Torstein 
Fjelman, Jonas 
Gabrielsen, EUing 
Garvin, F. 
Fasig, Don 
Georgensen, A. 
Gerdes, August 
Glbbs. H. D. 
Giesen, Billy 
<lilholm, Albin 
Gilje, S. 
Gilling, John 
Gjardahl, Soren 
Glase, Gust 
Gonda, Cornelius 
Grabovac, A. 
Haak, R. 
Haas, Oscar 
Haagensen, M. 
Habedank, F. 
Habsbon. Jas. 
Hatke, Peter 
Haggar, F. W. 
Hagen, Louis 
Hagglund, Chas. 
Haier, Fred. 
Hakonson, Axel 
Hakonson, A. W. 
Hakonson, Axel 
Hammarin, C. F. 
liana, O. O. 
Hanmes, M. 
Hannus, Alex. 
Hansen, Emil 
Hausen, Andreas 
Hansen, Herman L. 
Hansen, Maiius, 

-1826 
Hansen, Nic 
Hausen, O. Rudolph 
Hansen, H. -1969 
Hansen, -1969 
Hansen, -2123 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, NlUs 
Hansen, Ole D. 
Hansen, Walter 
Hanson, H. C. 
Harmonson, K. 
Hartung, Richard 
Harttog, John 
Haseth, August 
Irwin, Robert 
Isaacson, Carl 
Jackson, John 
Jacobs, G. C. 
Jamleson, J. E. 
.lausson, Frederick 
Jensen, -2014 
Jensen, C. -769 
Jensen. Hans -2014 
.Tenssen, Johan 
Jepson, Nels 
Jefferson, Victor 
Jelman, J. 



Anderson. Victor 
Andersson. W. -1240 
Anderson, Axel B. 
Anderson, Carl 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Gus. 
Andersson, Karl A. 
Anderson, John 
Andresen. Anton 

-16.35 
Apostolakos, Peter 
Arnold, Ernest 
Arnold, E. B. 
Aronsen, Halfdan 
Asp, Gust. L. 
Aza, John 
Azini, Giuseppe 
Bertelsen. Alf. 
Berlin, Werner 
Berlin, Nils 
Bernard, S. 
Bird, Christopher 
BJomsen, Conrad 
Bjorkholm, G. A. 
Bladen. Pete 
Blauert, Wm. 
Block. B. 
Blomqvist. Helge 
Blumel, W. 
Boe. Carl R. 
Boldt. Chr. 
Boqvist, Charles 
Brattetvedt. H. N. 
Brander, W. 
Brannlgan. Wm. 
Braun, Johan D. 
Brelin, Adolf 
Brose, Richard 
Broders, Hajo 
Brun, Axel -1839 
Burton, Chester 
Burmeister, John 

Christensen, H. P. 
Christensen, Olaf 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Christophersen, 1288 
Clahsen, H. 
Clausen, Harry C. 
Classen, Henry 
Clvde, H. R. 
Cobac, P. 
Cox, H. E. 
Craig, E. 
Crangle, Jas. 
Cross, Leander D. 
Cunningham, .'An- 
drew 

Doense, -306 
Dories, H. 
Dosl, Theo. K. 
Doyle, Wm. 
Drager, Otto 
Dunn, Walter 
Duval, Bernard 
Duvel, Wilhelm 
Erdman, B. J. 
Eriksen, Karl J. 

-513 
Ericksen, O. -606 
Ericksen, Edw. 
Eriksen, K. H. 
Erickson, C. -333 
Espersen, Anton 
Ericksen, Erick 
Erickson, Victor 
Erie, Andrew 
Espeland, August 

Folvik, L. 0. 
Forde. C. 
Forberg. Alex. 
Foster, Mr. 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Graham, L. M. 
Grantley, C. W. K. 
Greenau, Charles 
Gronlung, Oscar 
Gronman, Karl 
Gronholm, W. 
Groth, John 
Guger, August 
Gulliksen, L. Chr. 
Gundersen, Krlstian 
Gundersen, John 
Gustafsen. Gust. 
Gusjaas, Oscar 

Haugen, Lars 
Haug, H. H. 
Hazel, Wm. 
Hedlund, W. 
Heggstrom, H. 
Heggebo, I. 
Heinaz, C. 
Heinig, Johann 
Heldt, Charles 
Hellisto, Emil 
Helmros, G. 
Heltwood, A. S. 
Hengst. Otto 
Henriksen, Carl 

-1737 
Henriksen, Henrik 
Henriksson. -2028 
Hermansen, -1622 
Hermansen, Fritz 
Hesketh, H. B. 
Hesse, Emil A. 
Hetman. Walter 
Hillig, Albert 
Hofgaard, Hans 
Hogan, A. 
Hogan, Jim 
Holden, Olaf 
Holmes, Alex. 
Honor, Charles 
Housler, Otto 
Hove. Haakon 
Hubertz, Emil 
Hunt, Thos. 
Huse, Edw. 
Humphrey, W. P. 
Hutchison. Alex. 
Iveisen, Fred. 

Johnson, John W. 
Johnson, Julius 
Johnson, Ivar 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, J. M. 
Johansen, -2021 
Johansen, Chas. 
Johanson, Albert 
Johanson, -1677 
Johansson, -1856 
Johansson, Axel B. 



Jenkins, Fred. Johnson, G. Alb. 

Jennett, Geo. E. Johnson, W. 

.lensen, P. Johnsson, Clias. 

■loliaunessen, Arthur Johnsson, Herman 
.liiliaiiscii. JOrnest Jordlald. 'I'll. 
.Iiiliaii.scii, Olaf K. Jorgensen, A. -1840 
Johansson, K. T. Jorgensen, Jorgen 

-1710 Jorgensen, H. P. 

Joimsen, Chas. -1593 -1498 
Johansson, Bernard Joseph, Ambrose 
Joliansson, Gust. Jouanne, Walter 



Johansson, l^aul 
Kaasik, A. 
Kallas, Aug. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kalniii, Ed. 
Kane, J. 
Karsten, Hugo 
Karlsen, -388 



Konkila, Johan 
Kopperstad, O. 
Kopatz, Chas. 
Korsberg, Walter 
Kosler, Jack 
Kotcharin, J. 
Kihlman, Gunnar 



Karlgren, Gus -644 Kilkeny, M. F. 
Karlberg, Karl Alt. Kirwan, Milton L. 
Karlsson, Oscar, Kirkwood, Walter 



-1399 
Karlsson, Karl J. 
Karsberg, Volmar 
Kaspersen, Christ 
Kelly, E. 
Kelly, T. F. 
Kenny, Jas. 
Kielman, Joe 
Kieson, Paul 
Kinsay, Wm. 
Klebingat, F. 



Kjarsgaard, Hans 
Knudsen, M. -375 
Krane, .Vnton 
Kraul, John 
Kralvik, O. 
Kramer, Fred 
Kratz, R. 
Kreft, Paul 
Krlstiansen, K. S. 
Kristansen, -1355 
Krotchin, H. 



Klemmensen, Eddy Kruger, Wilhelm 
King, Harry Kuhlman, Wm. 

Knudsen, Matthias Kumel, K. 



Koch, Harry 

Kohne, Ernest 

KolastafC, Julius 

Kolbe, Albin 

Laine, W. E. 

Larsen, Anders 

Larsen, F. A. -1113 Lexberg, Gustav 

Larsen, H. C. M. Llnd, Chas. 



Kumlander, E. 
Kupper, Alfred 
Kvarsell, W. 

Lewenson, John 
Lewis, Geo. 



Larsen, -1550 
l.arsen, Charles E. 
Larsen, F. A. 
Larsen, Ingvard 
Larsen, Chr. S. 
Larssen, Soren M. 
Larson, Karl 
Larson, Max 
Latham, T. H. 
Lauritzen, O. 
Lauritsen, Hans 
Larsen, Klaus 
Leino, G. f. 
Leighthoft, Chas. 
Lersten, J. O. 
I.ewald, H. 
Madson, 'Ihorolf 
Magnusson, Gust. 
Magnusson, C. G., 

-691 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Magnusson, G. W. 

-1147 
Majuri, -1912 
Mailenin, Chas. 
Mamers, Chas. 
Marin, Joe 
Martin, Howard 
Martinusen, Olaf 
Martinsen, Nils 



D. 



Lind, W. 
Lindgren, Gus 
I^und, P. 
Lundstrom, T. 
Lindblad, C. 
Linder, Chas. 
Lindgren, Clias. 
Lindeback, Linart 
Ljundberg, H. 
Litalien, Gust. 
Long, Robert 
Lorentzen, J. E 
Ludewig, E. 
Ludvigsen, A. -1249 
Loughlin, M. J. 
Luhrs, L. -1179 
McKenna, Barny 
McLaughlin, J. 
McMahon, Jack 
Mehrtens. Herman 
Meidell, John 
Meious, Alex. 
Meskell, Mat. 
Meyer, Otto 
Meyers, Hermann 
Meyer, F. C. 
Michelson, Joseph 
Michaelsen, Johannes 
Mikklesen, Alf. 
Miller, James 



Martinsen, K. -1721 Milos, Peter 



Mason, W. 
Mathesen, Nils 
Mathson, Mauritz 
Mattson, William 
Matson, Johannes 
Mattson, J. M. 
McCuU, James 
McDonald. John 
McKeating, R. 
McKenzie, Jas. 
Naujack, Gust. 
Nedberg, August 
Neeg, Theodor 
Nelsen, Ed. -1044 
Nelson, Carl W. 
Nelson, John 
Nelson, A. B. 
Niel, Kene 
Nielsen, Sivert 
Nielsen, -1072 
Oelmich, Harry 
Oistad, H. 
O'Neill, Jas. 
Olavsen, Christian 
Olsen, E. 
Olsen, H. -478 
Olsen, H. -1169 
Olsen, John A. 
Olsen. -700 
Olsen. Billie 
Olsen, Chas. 
Olsen, O. 
Olsen, Olaf D. 
Pactlaw, Edw. H. 
Palmer, Joseph 
Paludan, Chas. 
Paulsen, Jens 
Paulsen, N. 
Pearson, N. F. 
Pearson, J. T. 
Pearson, John S. 
Pearson, S. 
Pedersen, Laurlts 
Pekman, Ernest 
Pendville, N. 
Persson, A. F. 
Perier, Jno. 
Perlsen, N. 
Petersen, Aage 
Petersen, Gert 



Misterman, Paul 
Mitchell, A. 
Moe, John 
Moller, Hans 
Moller, L. T. O. 
Montell, Chas. 
Moore, Wm. 
Morse, Harry W. 
Muller, John 

Nielsen, S. -1030 
NUsen, Hendrik 
Nilsen, Ingvald 
Nilsen, Alfonse 
Nilson. N. 
Nilsson, C. M. 
Nordbloni, Ben 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norris, Edward 

Olsen, O. E. -991 
Olsen, S. -1119 
Olson, Birger 
Olson, G. B. 
Olson, G. F. -562 
Olson, Hans 
Olson, O. H. 
Ong, Geo. L. 
Opperman, Wm. 
Osborn, Chas. 
Overock, Thos. 
Ozard, Wm. 

Petersen, Olaf -1392 
Petersen, Meier 
Pettersen, S. A. 
Peterson, S. 
Peterson, A. 
Peterson, Chas. S. 
Peterson, J. -1138 
Peterson, L. 
Peterson, S. H. 
Peterson, Victor 
Petterson, H. A. 
-1154 

Peterson, W. A. 
Peterson, Otto 
Peterson, Oscar 
Petterson, Victor 
-1447 



Petersen, H. A. R. Phillips, Geo. 
Petersen, Berthel Phillips, Max 
Petersen, N. -1235 
Petersen, Oscar 



Petersen, Geo. 
Petersen, C. L. 
Petersen, Carl 
Quinn, Vfm. 
Ramberg, B. 
Rasmussen, -525 
Rasmusen, -497 



Pietschman, Geo. 
Pihpik, Ch. 
Pommer, John 
Priede, Wm. 
Pulkinen, Armas 
Quigley, Robert 
Rost, Chas. 
Ross, L. 
Rosenwold, I. 



Rasmussen, Peter P.^^^inho!^' ArvId 
Rasmussen, Emil Remhold, Ernst 



Reinink, H. 
Rizner, Ernest 
Robertson, A. 
Rosa, Geo. 
Rosenthal, J. 
Ryerson, Geo. 
Rozeness, Geo. 
Rozeness, Gunnar 



Rasmussen, Oscar 
Rasmussen, S. V. 

-980 
Redmond, Mr. 
Reed, W. H. 
Reek, John A. 
Reuter, Ernest 
Reutern. Axel 
Roaldson, F. E. 
Saar, F. A. 
Saar, J. A. 
Saarin, John 
Saalman, Joseph 
Safstrom, N. L. 

t^^^n. Martin ^^^^'^^^^ 
Schuster, Jacob 



Sandstrom. O. H. 
Sandberg, John 
Saul, Th. 
Schmidt, Hans 
Scheel, Carl 



Sandberg. N. A. 
Sander, Robert 
Sanderfeld, Fred 



Schwencke, Carl 
Schluter, Paul 



Schroeder, Herman Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Scharr. Leonard Sorensen. Tom -1492 



Schorer, L. F, 
Schroder, Paul 
Schevlg, Anton B, 



Sorger, G. M. E. 
Sorensen, N. M. 
Soto, Santos 



Schultman, John 
Scott, Emil G. 
Seliii, -1565 
Scinlxrg, John 
Siversen, C. 
Sexon, Chas. 
Simon, i'aul 
Sindrolh. Erik 
Sjoblom, Karl 
Sjogren, John 
Sinyard, W. 
Sjolund, Henry. 
Sjostrora, Gus. 
Skjellerup. Axel 
Stiiilli, Johan 
Smith. J. V. 
Smith, M. 
Smith, Max 
Sn.ll. Adolph 
Soler, Emanuel 
Sonimer, J. 
TervakalUo, G. A. 
Terras, M. 
Thomal, A. 
Theorin. J. E. 
Thomsen, G. E. 
Ulappa, K. 
Ulbrand, Wm. 
I'lla, Charles 
Valeur, Marius 
Van de Laan, D. 
Van Poelyen, P. 
Van Pel, J. 
Velure, H. -218 
Venema, Harry 
Verney, A. 
Wahlers, W. 
Wakkero, J. 
Ward. H. 
Walters, A. B. 
Walsh, R. J. 
\\'anack, M. 
Wanveich 
Waterloo, T. 
Wattern, G. 
Wasch, H. 
Welin, Herman 
Welure, J. 
West. William 
VVesterman. Oscar 
Westman, A. 
We.sk', Gustav 
Young, Peter 



Stangeland, P. 
Starr, T. 
Steen, Hilmar 
.Stellemark. E. 
Stoplian, M. -1455 
Stimseii. Harold 
Strantl. Cha.s. 
Stremmel, Harry 
Sube, Harry 
Sullivan, Jerry L. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Svanson, Chas. 
Svendsen, Otto 
Swanson, Ovel 
Thompson, Peder 
Tillman, Andrew 
Tscheckar, 
Svane, A. 
Svensson, L. G. 
Swansson, Gustaf 

Thompsen, Peter 
Thompson, Ch. 
Thorsen, Arthur 
Tuveson, John 

Uppit, W. 
Ursin, Jno. 

Vllpponen, Edv. 
Vlles, P. V. D. 
Vireck, A. H. F. 
Vis, Jacob 
Voightlander, Felix 
Vucic, V. 

Wetzel, Carl 
Wiberg, John 
Wifstrand, -937 
Wiig. F. Y. -1241 
Wikslrom, Emil 
WillbCTK, Karl 
Wilhelmsen, Hans 
Willman, -1020 
Willander, Oscar 
Willartz. Fred 
Wittelarig. John 
Wold, Olaf 
Wold. S. 
Work, John 
Wucst, Walter 
Wunstorf, Aug. 
Wyschell, J. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



-■Kaga, Johan 
Baisieux, M. 
Balda, Alfonso 
Uyrness, L. E. 
Eliason, C. 
Espersen, Anton 
Fasig, Dan 
Gustafson, K. O. 
Hansen. Chris -965 
Hannus, Alex. 
Hartmere, C. -1245 
Hogan, L. 
Ji>han.sen. John 



Johnson, John U. 

-2161 
McPherson, Peter 
Nilsen, Christ 
Sjoblom. Carl 
Soiren. Alfred -2443 
Seversen, Ch. 
Thoresen, Theodor 
Thilo, Peter 
Winblad. M. 
Wilson, John C. -642 
Wahl. Robert 
WcUire. J. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

.Anderson, A. Lorentzen, Ernst 

.\lmeida, J. C. Lund, P. 

Aalto, Almo Lundberg, H. 

Aken, Emil Lund, Aber 

Aleksandersen, Halv-Lindroth 
Andersen, -1119 Lahrman, T. 

Andersen, Emil Lundberg, C. 

Andersen, Andrew Muller 
Andersen, Olaf -1118Muller, J. K. 
Anderson, Chas. Maibohm, Hans 

Anderson, Martin Moris, 0<on K. 
Anderson, SvendMiller, F. W. 

Hugo Maibohm 

Anderson, John Muller, R. 

Anderson, G. A. S. Matlison, J. M. 
Anderson, Frank 



Ando, J. G. 
Bastian. Wm. 
Baxter, W. J. 
Benoit, Dewall 
Benson, Charles 
Bergland, A. 
Bianca, F. 
Bohm, August 



Mattson, J. A. 
Malmberg, Eli.H 
Mesketh, Robert 
Molher, S. D. 
Morse, H. W. 
Muller 
Moller, S. D. 
Nass. F. M. 
Nelson, Jack 



Bodahl, Hans -1740 Nelson, W. -1000. 
Buye, Anton Olsen, Carl -965 

Callow, A. W. Olson, Waldemar 

Carlsen, -699 Olsson, Ernest -906 

Christensen, Hans ' Opperman, Wm. 
Chresthensen, HarryO'Neill, Frank J. 



Davis, J. 
Ericksen, A. 
Erickson, A. 
Evensen, A. A. 
Evensen, Andrew 
Evensen, Louis 
Fardig, Wm. 
Gilbert. A. 
Hansen, — 
Hansen, J. T. 
Hansen, Jack 
Hanssen, Ernest 
Hanson. Henry 
Haut. W. 
Haraldson, John 
Hllig, Gust. 
Haraldson, -874 
Hernig, F. 
Heyke, F. 
Heyhe, A. 
livid. Hans 
Hohlstrom, A. 
Holm, Carl 
Hooley, Alex 
Hubner, H. 
Jansson, Louis 



Ouchterlong, Fritz 
Paul, Peter 
I'ista, T. 
Pettersson, -1065 
I'etersen, -109.''. 
Petersen, Carl 
Perdtes, John 
Pulkkinen, A. 
Penny, W. 
Pommer, John 
Petersen, Frank A. 
Price, Thurinan 
Rasehtun, Franz 
Rasmuss, Peter 
Reitter, F. 
Rentern, Axel 
Rasmussen, W. C. 
Kossbeck, Gust 
Rustanius, John 
Sanselber, Paul 
Samuelsen, Ingwald 
Schelenz, Chas. 
.Schnider, Henrich 
Schnider, H. 
Sansetter, Paul 
Svedstrup. E. D. 



Jenson, John Frank Smith. J. S. 



Johnsson, C. A. 
Johnsson, A. 
Johnson, Hilmer 
Johnson, Chas. 
Johansen, Fritz 
Johanson, Carsten 
John, Robert 
Johnson, P. T. 
Julian, A. B. 
Karlsson, A. M. 
Kellsh. George 
Kielman, Joe 
Kjarsgaard, Hans 
Klabee, Kawe 
Klobu, Kave 
Kolkin, F. 
Krauzer, Otto 



Svedstrup, E. F. 
Skattel, A. 
Seldel, Willy 
Slndahl, Jens 
Stange, Fritz 
Svendsen, E. 
Svenson, Bernard 
Syvertsen, H. 
Summers, James 
Thomas, Henry 
Thomas, T. S. 
Thomas, F. S. 
Thorsen. Otto 
Tanny, W. 
Vejoda, F. 
Weehauf, Henry 
Westre, Lars 



Lachman. Theodore Wiljanen, W. V. 



Laine, A. W. 
Laine, A. V. 
Larson, Christ. 
Lehtonen, John 
Lehtonen, Wlkter 
Lindroth. -1189 
LIndgaad, John 
Lindberg, John 
Lundberg, John 
Lindroos, A. V. 
LIndroos, A. W. 



Wllpanen. N. N. 

Wuest, Walter 

Zornon, Herbert 

PACKAGES 
Julius, P. 
Lehtlnen. Kaarlo 
MacGoldrick. .Tas. 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pollson, Tom 
Uggla, Fred. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Markets $ts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (THE GERMAN BANK) Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $ 1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up In 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund 113,473.47 

Deposits June 30th. 1911 44,567,705.83 

Total Assets 47,173,498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post 
Office, or Express Co.'s. Money Orders, 
or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; 
First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; Sec- 
ond Vice-President and Manager, George 
Tourny; Third Vice-President, J. W. Van 
Bergen; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secre- 
taries, G. J. O. Folte and Wm. D. New- 
house; Goodfellow, Eells & Orrick, Gen- 
eral Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, 
Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, J. W. Van 
Bergen, Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, F. 
Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH. 2572 Mission Street, 
between 21st and 22nd Streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 
Clement Street, between 5th and 6th Ave- 
nues. For receipt and payment of De- 
posits only. W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. Office open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 

Near Third Street 

100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 

8llk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below 6th, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 19«*; Home J-19U 



„SONNER AV NORGE" 

,,Henrik Ibsen" Loge No. 7 
San Francisco 
Moter hver Fredagaften Kl 8, 1 Vet- 
erans' Hall, 431 Duboce Ave. 

Medlemskontingent $1: per Maaned: 
Sykebldrag $10: per Uke. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Inion Label 
Goods 

This store is headquarters for Men's 

furnishing goods bearing the UNION 

LABEL. 

Shirts with the UNION LABEL. 

Collars with the UNION LABEL. 

Neckties with the UNION LABEL. 

Suspenders with the UNION LABEL. 



Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite 5th 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION tIATS 

Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Bensen, S. 
Christensen, Ole 

Martin 
Christensen, Harvy 
Farrell, Henry D. 
Frick, John 
Grant, John 
Grosfetti, J. 
Hansen, Hans F. 

-1746 
Hansen, J. P. 
Ivars, Carl 
Jacobson, W. 
Johansen, Arthur 
Johnston, R. 
Kolkin, Fred 
Krohn, John 



Langvid, Ernest 
I..undquist, Alex. 
Menz, Paul E. 
Nelsen, Nels 
Olsen, C. 
Oterdahi, C. 
Paludan. Chas. 
Pedersen, Peter 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Petteson, Oscar 
Plottner, W. 
Rasmusen, Karl 
Rowke, Fred. 
Schivig, B. 
Wachmann, Hans 
Wallen, L. 
Wilson, John 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



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ON CREDIT 



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MARKET ST. 

Upstairs 




iiiJi.in 



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Francisco, 

Cal. 



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C. BREINING Special Marine District Representative 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



BOSs^jWiAD 



OVERALLS 

DEMAND THE BRAND 



Neustadter Bros. 

5AN FRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



VN^^VN/VSi'VVW^^^W'- 



The James 11. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLOTHIER AND FURNISHER 
FOR GENTLEMEN 

Up-to-Date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 
Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

REDISEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Su. A. 
Anderson, V. 
Anderson, E. Alfred 
liarnard, C. 
Huckland, W. 
Huwnieister, I. 
Carlson, M. 
Carlson, Conrad -551 
Collins, E. F. 
Conrad, Fritz 
Drisooll, I. 
Dublin. Gustaf 
Fors, Alfred 
Goude, C. 
Grove, Albert 
Gustafson, .lohan 
Gustafson. Axel 
Hanson, H. I. 
llakonson, Ingvar 



Tlegnn, Patriclc 
Ilolten, I'ete 
.lacobson, Erland 
Johan.son. II. .1. 
Karlson, N. 
Larson, Louis 
Lovik, Aron N. 
Lundbech, M. S. 
Marvin, Joseph I>. 
Mittemeyer, J. F. 
Nielsen, Wiihelm 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Nielsen, Chr. 
Nielsen, Niels -".'il 
Schelenz, Karl 
Smith, Max 
Sovig. Mavtm 
Stensland, Paul 
Weback, S. 



Labor News. 



President Gompers, of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, addressed a 
McNamara protest meeting at San 
Francisco on September 24. 

A referendum vote on the ques- 
tion whether to continue the strike of 
6000 garment workers at Cleveland 
on September 11 resulted 10 to 1 for 
a continuance of the strike. 

Tlie strike of the ladies' tailors and 
dressmakers, which has been in prog- 
ress at New York, will be settled by 
arbitration. The strikers are to re- 
turn to work at once pending (he de- 
cision of the arbitrators. 

The strike of the clerks of the Il- 
linois Central Railroad at Mounds, 
111., which began a week ago, was 
settled on September 23 by the com- 
pany taking back all clerks, including 
the two who caused the walkout. 

'J'hc Order of Railroad Telegraph- 
ers is steadily advancing and in- 
creases in wages are the order of the 
day. The wages of the operators em- 
ployed by the Denver & Rio Grande 
Railroad have just been increased by 
from 5 to 10 per cent. 

William Bonner and Samuel Olson 
were arrested at Chicago on Septem- 
ber 19, charged with the murder of 
Rush V. Denon, a printer, by labor 
"sluggers" on January 16. Eight oth- 
er men are sought by the police in 
connection with the killing. 

President McArdle, of the Amalga- 
mated Association of Iron, Steel and 
Tin Workers, who is now doing serv- 
ice as a Pittsburg Councilman, has re- 
signed, and Secretary-Treasurer John 
Williams has been appointed as his 
successor. Assistant Secretary Tighe 
has been appointed Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 

The Santa Fe Railroad was de- 
clared guilty at San Bernardino, Cal., 
on September 21 of violation of the 
Full Crew law and ordered to pay a 
fine of $200. The specific offense was 
that of having operated between San 
Bernardino and Los Angeles a passen- 
ger train of more than three cars with 
only one brakeman. 

The strike of the Detroit United 
Railway employes was settled by ar- 
bitration on September 20 after a few 
hours' duration. The employes ac- 
cepted a new wage rate schedule of 
23 cents an hour for the first six 
months, 27yi cents for the next year, 
and 29^ cents thereafter. The rate 
was within half a cent of that origi- 
nally demanded. 

The Sydney (Aus.) Labor Council 
is now issuing an appeal for financial 
assistance for the dependents of the 
men now out of work owing to the 
dispute with the employers at the 
l.ithgow mine and ironworks. The 
circular gives particulars of the trou- 
ble as supplied by the unions af- 
fected, and states that the men are 
very confident that they can, with the 
assistance of their fellow unionists, 
gain a victory — not only for them- 
selves, but for unionism generally. 

\Vhi.n addressing a meeting of 
many thousands of coal strikers in 
(lie Rhondda Valley, Wales, recently, 
Andrew Fisher, Premier of Australia, 
declared that in all disputes "the gen- 
eral guiding principle which should 
be dominant was that which prevailed 
in Australia, where it was laid down 
as an axiom that every person who 
honestly gave his labor should be 
given sufficient remuneration to en- 
able his family to be kept in a reason- 
able state of comfort as human be- 
ings." 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




TJ(lui(l. — ■■'Fliosc Kentucky feuds 
are terril>le." 

"I don't know that T ever went 
against any Kentucky foods, but 1 
know the Kentucky drinks can do a 
lot of things to a man."— Houston 
Post. 



Society Item. — Algy— I find that 
motoring agrees witli me much 1)etter 
than horseback riding. 

Genevieve — You certainly look 
much better in an automobile than 
you do on horseback. — Chicago Trib- 
une, 



Natural Reticence. — "I had a talk 
with Best-Seller and he told me all 
about the authors who had helped 
him." 

"I'll bet he didn't say a word about 
the authors from whom he had helped 
himself." — Puck. 



His Oversight. — "He asked her 
when he proposed if she knew how to 
keep house." 

"That was a happy thought." 

'.'Yes, and still he overlooked a 
bet." 

"How was that?" 

"He forgot to ask her if she knew 
how to keep still." — Houston Post. 



She Flew. — Miss Fullosoul (of a 
poetical turn) — Which are you of 
opinion one should say, professor — 
"summer flies" or "summer flees?" 

Absent-minded Professor (great on 
entomology) — The two species, my 
dear young lady, are entirely distinct. 

Now the common house fly (Then 

he wondered why she suddenly 
opened a conversation with the 
young man on her right.) — Sphere. 



Laws. — "What law is that timid, 
shrinking one over tluMC by the 
door?" 

"The unhappy law that looks as if 
it wished it were dead?" 

"Yes; the one with the black eye." 
"That's the Sherman law." 
"And what is this bold florid one 
that everybody treats with so much 
deference?" 

"That's the unwritti'n l;iw." — New- 
ark News. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They can not start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets. Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OM) AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 

is under the direct and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 

with all modern appliances to illustrate and 

teach any brancli of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a knowl- 
edge of Navigation, and Navigation only. 
Conditions have changed, and the American 
seamen demand a man as a teacher with 
higher attainments than one who has only 
tlie limited ability of a seaman. The Prin- 
cipal of this School, lieeping this always in 
view, studied several years the Maritime 
Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of Navigation and its 
Icindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, for 
no matter how ignorant the seaman may be. even in the rudiments of common 
education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the depths of 
Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a comparatively 
short interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 




THE RELIANCE LIEE INSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Pittsburg, Pa. 

Nothing will solve the problem of how to secure ourselves and 
those dependent upon us toward the uncertainties of an eventful 
future more satisfactory than our policies. 

"They offer a fully paid-up policy to every man disabled for life 
from accident or disease, after payment of the first year's premium." 

CAPT. RUDOLF SCHMEHL. 
Marine Representative on the Pacific Coast 

1000 First National Bank Building ------ San Francism 




Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nautical 
I'ublicatlons, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE C»EW 
Give It a Trieil 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY 

J. COHEN a CO. 

Baltimore ClotHin^ Store 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 
have installed a Tailoring Department in their store and are now making 

Suits to Order 

Union Label, Union Tailors 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 



Eyes Examined F ree Repairing Our Specialty 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

S.^N FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 

the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 




James Ji. Sorensen 

^9t and Jraas. 



>lssMd6jj^^nbcttlis<^ «S 
iliiumiWiiRnu,^g|K»JiiTERiuinaHAL | UIVIOIV 



- ^^*^ '''!! ~^!^ -ltrjFj!^ MADE 



United States Nautical College 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 
Member of California Teachers' Association. 

Candidates prepared in the shortest possible time for Masters, Mates, 

Pilots and Wireless Operators. 

Government Examinations. 

The Hitchfield system is the easiest and most modern in all branches. 

Do yourself the justice to investigate. 

320 Market Street, San Francisco. Phone Kearny 4686 



Hale's 'Xrescent" 
Sewing Machines 

Won First Prize at 

1911 Caifornia 

State Fair 

Hale's '"Crescent" machines are 
sold on club terms and protected 
l>y a ten-year guarantee to be free 
from defects and prove satisfac- 
tory in all respects. 

Furthermore, we keep them in 
repair absolutely free of charge 
during that time, no matter what 
gets out of order, or why. 

14c A DAY 
Is the appro.xini.itc ;iinount thai 
pays ff)r these machines, 2.00 down, 
then 1.00 a week until the balance 
is completed. No extras or inter- 
est. Prices range from 15.00 to 
45.00. 




Good good^ 

Market and Sixth Sti . 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 



719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 



C. BREINING 

Representing Marine Diitrict 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnlsliing Goods, Hats, Caps. Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Ktc, Boots, Shoes, Rubl>er 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Aut- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 







FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 


A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXV. No. 3. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 191 1 


Whole No. 2140. 





WORKINGMEN'S INSURANCE. 



Throughout the civilized world a devel- 
oping sense of social responsibility has com- 
pelled the community to support in some 
manner its needy members whatsoever the 
cause of their inability to support them- 
selves. 

In granting this aid we are passing from 
sporadic emotional charity to organized 
charities, and from mere relief to preventive 
measures. We have learned that financial 
dependence among the wage-earners is due, 
in large part, to sickness, accident, invalidity, 
superannuation or unemployment, or to pre- 
mature death of the bread-winner of the 
family. Contingencies like these, referred 
to in the individual case as a misfortune, 
are now recognized as ordinary incidents of 
the lives of the wage-earners. And since 
our existing industrial system is converting 
an ever-increasing percentage of the popu- 
lation into wage-earners, the need of pro- 
viding indemnity against financial losses 
from such ordinary contingencies in the 
workingman's life has become apparent. 
So sickness and death benefits, and methods 
of compensation for accidents ha->'e been re- 
sorted to. But this partial workingmen's 
insurance has served mainly in making clear 
the need of a comprehensive system which 
shall extend protection also to the wage- 
earner in case of invalidity, superannuation 
or unemployment, and to the widows and 
orphans left helpless by the premature death 
of luisl)and or father. In this movement to 
establish a comprehensive system of work- 
ingmen's insurance, Germany, France and 
latterly England have already advanced far. 
An Essential of Democracy. 

The United States must follow on the 
same path ; for the conditions which have 
led to the introduction of workingmen's in- 
surance abroad are universal in their opera- 
tion. Besides, the form and aims of our 
government should lead us to action as well 
as the sense of social responsibility. Amer- 
ican democracy rests upon the basis of the 
free citizen. We accord (to the men) uni- 
versal suflfrage. We urge strenuously upon 
every voter the duty of exercising this right. 



We insist that the voter should exercise it 
in the interest of others as well as of him- 
self. We give thus to the citizen the rights 
of a free man. We impose upon him a duty 
that can be entrusted with safety only to 
free men. Politically the American work- 
ingman is free, so far as law can make him 
so. But is he really free? Can any man be 
really free who is constantly in danger of 
becoming dependent for mere subsistence 
upon somebody and something else than 
his own exertion and conduct? Men are 
not free while financially dependent upon 
the will of other individuals. Financial de- 
pendence is consistent with freedom only 
where claim to support rests upon right and 
not upon favor. 

President Cleveland's epigram that it is 
the duty of the citizen to support the gov- 
ernment, not of the government to support 
the citizen, is only qualifiedly true. Univer- 
sal suffrage necessarily imposes upon the 
State the obligation of fitting its governors 
— the voters — for their task; and freedom of 
the individual is as much an essential con- 
dition of successful democracy as is educa- 
tion. If the government permits conditions 
to exist which make large classes of citizens 
financially dependent, the great evil of de- 
pendence should at least be minimized by 
the State's assuming, or causing to be as- 
sumed by others in some form, the burden 
incident to its own shortcomings. 

A Part of the Daily Cost of Living. 

The cost of attaining freedom is usually 
high ; and the cost of providing to the work- 
ingman, as an essential of freedom — a com- 
prehensive and adequate system of insur- 
ance — will prove to be no exception to this 
general rule. But however large the cost, 
it should be fairly faced and courageously 
met. For the expense of securing indem- 
nity against the financial losses attending 
accident, sickness, invalidity, premature 
death, superannuation, and unemployment, 
should be recognized as a part of the daily 
cost of living, like the more immediate de- 
mands for rent, for food, and for clothing. 
So far as it is a necessary charge, it should 



be met now as a current expense: instead 
of being allowed to accumulate as a debt 
with compound interest to plague us here- 
after. 

Few intelligent property owners omit to 
insure against fire. Everybody recognizes 
the fire insurance premium as a current ex- 
pense. And yet the chance of loss by fire 
is very slight as compared with the chance 
of loss of earnings by sickness, accident or 
premature death. Every intelligent manu- 
facturer makes in some form a regular 
charge for depreciation of machinery and 
plant. And yet the depreciation of man 
through invalidity and superannuation is 
no less certain, and frequently more severe, 
than the depreciation of machinery. Every 
intelligent manufacturer recognizes rent, 
interest and taxes as a current daily charge 
which continues, although his plant is shut 
down or operates at less than fidl capacity. 
The manufacturer makes allowance for this 
in calculating the cost of i)roduction as an 
extra charge to be met from the earnings 
of active days. But the cost to the employer 
of carrying an unusued plant is not as great 
relatively as the cost to the employee of 
carrying himself and family while unem- 
ployed. The manufacturer who fails to rec- 
ognize fire insurance, depreciation, inter- 
est and taxes as current charges of the busi- 
ness, treads the path to bankruptcy. And 
that nation does the like which fails to rec- 
ognize and provide against the economic, 
social and political conditions which im- 
l)ose u])on the workingman so large a de- 
gree of financial dependence. 

The High Cost of Adequate Insurance. 

What sum would be rc(|uirc(I annually 
to provide an adecjuate .system of working- 
men's insurance cannot be determined from 
existing data. The cost would obviously 
vary greatly in dififerent occupations and 
different communities. An amount equal 
to ten per cent, of the current wages would 
go far towards relieving in many industries 
the distress now incident to sickness, acci- 
dent, invalidity, premature death, superan- 
p'.uition and unemployment of the wage 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



earner. But it is certain that the proceeds 
of even so large a charge as ten per cent, 
of the average daily wage would, under 
present conditions, aflford merely allevia- 
tion of and not indemnity for the losses 
now attendant upon those contingencies in 
the life of the workingnian. The cost of 
providing complete indemnity would proba- 
bly reach an amount equal to twenty-five 
per cent, of the average daily wage. For 
the premiums requisite to secure indemnity 
from losses incident to sickness, accident, 
invalidity, premature death, or superannua- 
tion would probably aggregate fifteen per 
cent, of the daily wage; while the average 
percentage required to indemnify for unem- 
ployment due to lack of work would prob- 
ably rise above ten per cent. 

The Huge Present Waste. 

This huge and apparently prohibitive 
expense should not. however, deter us from 
taking action now. It should on the con- 
trary, incite us to immediate and vigorous 
measures. Indeed it has in it elements of 
great encouragement. It will disclose how 
vast the waste incident to present social and 
industrial conditions is. And when the ex- 
tent of that waste shall have been deter- 
mined, and made clear to our people, a long 
step forward will have been taken on the 
road to improvement and resulting social 
economy. 

Some idea of the possibilities of im- 
provement in this connection are indicated 
by the following data : 

Prof. Irving -Fisher has compared the mor- 
tality record of the industrial life insurance 
companies which provide life insurance to 
the workingmen in amounts of less than 
$.^00 on the weekly premium plan, with the 
mortality in the ordinary life insurance com- 
panies, in which the policies average $1000 
or more. The figures of deaths per year 
for eacii 1000 persons insured are these: 

Industrial Life Insurance Ordinary Lite Insurance 
Mortality (Metropolitan Mortality 

Life Experience) (English Experience) 

Age 20 10..=^ 7.3 

Age 2.^ 14.1 7.8 

.■\ge 3.=; 17.2 0.3 

Age .v=^ 35 21.7 

The conditions under which that portion 
of our population lives and works who are 
insured in the ordinary life companies are 
far from ideal, and leave open a great op- 
portunity for reduction of the death rate. 
But here we have an average death rate 
among the workingmen at their most pro- 
ductive age — 25 to 35 years — which is 
nearly twice as great as the death rate 
among those engaged in other occupations. 
And this high death rate of the workingnian 
is that of the average insured workingnian, 
not the death rate of those engaged in ex- 
tra hazardous trades. 

Can there be any doubt that if this heav- 
ier mortality had to be adequately compen- 
.sated for by the State, or the industries, 
and the insurance cost paid from current 
earnings, its cause would be adequately in- 
vestigated, and the evil conditions of living 
and working which produce it would be 
remedied? Society and industry would find 
how much cheapei* it is to conserve than 
to destroy. 

The Ek:onomy of Humanity. 

How near at hand the remedy for high 
mortality lies is illustrated by the experi- 
ence of the model factory village at Bourne- 
(Continued on Page II.) 



"EL CAPITAN DEL PUERTO." 



Tiic little land-locked harbor of Buena 
Ventura, on the west coast of Venezuela, 
with its limped waters and verdant, sloping 
shores, looked good to the crew of the 
barque Beowulf, which had just dropped 
anchor one hundred and thirty-five days 
out from Hamburg. To men who had gee- 
hawed and scull-dragged their weary way 
through the doldrums and given battle to 
the roaring westerlies off the Horn, keep- 
ing body and soul together the while on 
the old pint-an'-poun'-accordin'-to-the-act- 
"limejuice" scale of provisions, the sight of 
thatched cabins nestling beneath cocoa 
palms and mango trees, with little fat, 
squealing pigs and flocks of chickens run- 
ning at large everywhere, was indeed a 
vision like unto that of the Promised Land 
to the Children of Israel. 

I'ut Johnny Houltant is never permitted 
for long to indulge in day-dreams. His 
owners would have fits if they tiiought he 
were. No sooner had the cliain been paid 
out and weather-bitted than the mate, a big, 
husky chap, roared out: 

"All right there, lads. Get up there now 
an' furl them sails, — starboard watch on the 
main, port watch for'ard." 

Slowly they clambered up the weather- 
stained rigging, the shrouds slackened from 
months of incessant rolling and straining. 
There was no racing to .see who would be 
first up on the royal yard. The debilitating 
poison of incipient scurvy was already in 
their blood, and not even the near prospect 
of a fresh mess could banish the lassitude 
which weighted their limbs with the drag- 
ging heaviness of an incubus. 

.Suddenly "Trawler" Pete, who had reached 
the main top gallant yard, seemed to get 
iinikily excited over .something. Nervously 
clutching at the jackstay with one hand and 
jKiinting downward witli the other at some 
object in tile water, he sung out: 

"Look a' that, mates! Jesus wept — ain't 
he a monster? Lord, but he's a wicked- 
lookin' ol' cuss !" 

The languor and inertia which but a mo- 
ment before had obsessed them all vanished 
like gloom before sunbeams. Everyone took 
a securer hold of the becket nearest to hand, 
and instinctively felt of the footropes and 
stirrups to make sure that they were as 
good as they looked. There is nothing like 
a little excitement, with a spice of danger 
or uncertainty in it, to quicken men's pulses. 
-Monotony kills its thousands where hard 
work and worry merely toughen them. 

The "monster" to which "Trawler" Pete 
had so vehemently pointed was a mammoth 
tiger shark lazily swimming around the ship, 
evidently sizing up the new-comer in his do- 
main in no spirit of good will if one might 
judge from the marrow-chilling stare in the 
cruel, blood-streaked eyes. He was a fear- 
some-looking creature, about twenty-two 
feet long and some thirteen feet in girth, with 
a pair of jaws seemingly capable when agape 
of swallowing a fisherman's dory. That he 
was a seasoned veteran of the deep was 
clearly indicated by the many clusters of bar- 
nacles dotting his spotted back and broad- 
barred sides. And, in common with most old 
veterans, he had apparently been forsaken by 
his kind, not even a pilot fish trailing in his 
wake as he placidly glided hither and yon 
throtigh the iiellucid dcjiths. 

Was he a man-eater? \Mio could tell? 
Piut if appearances counted for anything he 



had in all probability digested more than 
one hapless specimen of the genus homo, 
species old salt. 

"Watch me hook that there big sucker 
before night, boys," airily chirruped "Traw- 
ler" Pete as he was coming down from aloft 
along with the rest of the gang after having 
furled all the sails. "I never yet seen any- 
thing that swims that I couldn't catch." 

"An" who in hell d'ye think's goin' ter pull 
'im on board for you?" indignantly chorused 
the gang. 

"Youse fellers, o" course," replied "Traw- 
ler," unabashed. "I'm goin' ter make a 
walkin' stick for the old man from the back- 
bone of that there fish, so I rather guess an' 
I calkerlates as they say in Noo York, that 
youse fellers'll have to do some pullin' when 
T hooks 'im." 

"Be Jasus," snarled "Pimply" Duf?y, "if 
yez ain't as big a sucker as that there shark 
Oi'll ate the pair o' yez, an' (!)i'll lave it to 
all ban's here if Oi'ni right or wrong. A 
walkin' shtick for the ould man is it yez'll 
be afther makin' — " 

"Cut that yarn short," bellowed the mate 
at this juncture. "Come on there an' get 
the decks cleared up. Youse can do your 
chinnin' in your own time, but just now 
you'll have to do less talkin' an' more work. 
Lay aft there some o' youse an' tie up that 
spanker. Three han's go for'ard an' tie up 
them jibs, an' roll 'em up snug. The rest o' 
youse coil up the ropes an' broom off the 
poop." 

Presently eight bells were struck and all 
hands went to dinner. After dinner "Traw- 
ler" Pete went aft and got a shark-hook 
and, as a token of the skipper's apprecia- 
tion of the promised walking stick, a two- 
pound piece of fat salt pork with which to 
bait it. When everything was in readiness 
he slung the hook overboard on the star- 
board side abreast of the fore rigging and 
waited for results. 

By now the sporting blood of the gang 
was up, so everybody lined up along the rail 
to watch the proceedings. Pretty soon Mr. 
Shark came along, heading for the piece of 
pork with a wiggle of his tail which plainly 
showed that he was interested. 

Tensely excited everybody watched for 
the next move. The big fish had come to a 
stop and was nosing at the chain to which 
the hook was attached in a way that sug- 
gested puzzlement. Then he slowly turned 
over on his side, opened his capacious jaws, 
and gently closed them over the tempting 
pork bait. 

"Pull up, 'Trawler,' pull up, pull up; 
you've got 'im," excitedly shouted the 
crowd, forgetting for the moment that they 
had but a short time before cursed both him 
and the shark. 

"Trawler" yanked on the line and Mr. 
Shark gracefully let go of the bait, swim- 
ming off to a safe distance and wiggling his 
tail more vigorously than ever as if he really 
enjoyed the experience. 

Again and again the creature repeated this 
stunt in a manner that seemed to indicate 
the possession of both reasoning faculties 
and a sense of humor. This impression was 
further strengthened by the fact that when- 
ever the cook threw some scraps of food 
overboard the monster avidly devoured 
them, his glassy eyes cunningly turned u])- 
ward toward the rail with a look of expec- 
tancy reflected in their depths. 

As the days wore on and there was 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



I 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



McNAMARA DEFENSE FUND. 



ALL TRADE-UNIONS, INDIVIDUAL 
TRADE-UNIONISTS AND THE PUB- 
LIC AT LARGE ARE URGED BY THE 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE McNA- 
MARA DEFENSE FUND. CONTRIBU- 
TIONS MAY BE SENT TO THE OF- 
FICE OF THE COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL OR TO FRANK MORRISON, 
SECRETARY, AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR, 801-809 G ST., N. W., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



"Martyr To His Cause." 

Trade-unionists and the general ])ublic 
tliroui^hout the country are S'oi'ig" to have 
an opportunity to witness the production of 
a motion i)icture that is said to be a master- 
piece in that line of entertainment known as 
"the world in motion." It will be jiroduced 
in the leading theatres and moving picture 
houses and will prove interesting and in- 
structive. 

The principal parts have been played by 
representative labor men with a national 
reputation, and the picture will be a true and 
correct representation of the incident that 
stirred the country, when a citizen was 
drag'ged from his home and friends and 
spirited to a distant part of the nation, con- 
trary to law and the traditions of our Re- 
public. 

The McNamara Ways and Means Com- 
mittee have perfected arrang"ements with W. 
M. Seely, of Dayton, O., to manufacture and 
distribute reels of motion pictures portray- 
ing the principal events in the life of John 
J. McNamara, and particularly the most im- 
portant incidents relating to his kidnaping 
from Indianapolis, Ind. 

The sale of tickets will be under the direc- 
tion of a committee of representative labor 
men, appointed by the central bodies, and 
councils of the building, metal and label 
trades, where they exist, on the request of 
the ofificers of the American Federation of 
Labor. 

During the week of October 8-14, inclu- 
sive, the initial production will take place 
at the American Theater, Cincinnati, under 
the title of "A Martyr to His Cause." 

The officers of the A. F. of L. will imme- 
diately announce the cities in which the reels 
are to be shown and request the appointment 
of local committees, submitting therewith 
literature and data as to the means of han- 
dling the show. A specially designed ticket 
has been provided, which will be issued by 
Secretary Morrison to the joint committee 
having charge of local arrangements in each 
city. This will be distributed as soon as the 
cities are selected where the reels are to be 
displayed. 



Results of Organization. 

The following excerpt from "Toilers of 
Mis.souri," issued as a supplement to the 
32nd annual report of the Missouri Bureau 
of Labor Statistics, will show that unionism 
is a profitable investment: "While the av- 
erage time for organized labor is 8.87 hours 
a day, there are 94 locals in St. Louis whose 
members worked only 8 hours a day. In 



addition there were 4.S with 9 hours, 47 with 
10 hours, two with 12 hours, and one with 
13 hours a day. One local had a schedule of 
8^2 hours a day. The highest wages per 
hour were paid to the plasterers, who re- 
ceived 75 cents. Then came the bricklayers 
with 70 cents an hour ; stone masons, 65 
cents; carpenters, 60 cents; electrical work- 
ers. 65 cents ; cement workers, 60 cents ; en- 
gineers, Ci2y> cents ; ironworkers and lathers, 
62y2 cents ; painters, 60 and 62i/^ cents ; pipe 
coverers, 62^/2 cents ; plumbers, 66^4 cents ; 
machine operators, printers, 60 cents; roof- 
ers, 623-2 cents; steam fitters, 68^ cents; 
tuck pointers, 60 cents. Union cooks drew 
$25 a week, fiat. Some engineers were paid 
$00 a month, straight. 



Two Important Decisions. 

The Kentucky Court of Appeals has held, 
in the case of the Interstate Coal Company 
vs. Baxavenie, that "the owner and operator 
of a mine could not relieve himself of the 
duties imposed by the statutes of the State 
for the protection of human life by con- 
tracting the work at so much per yard to 
parties who hire, pay or discharge their own 
employes." 

The Supreme Court of Louisiana has held, 
in the case of Le Blanc vs. United Irrigation 
and Rice Milling Company, that it is not 
sufficient for an employer merely to instruct 
a new workman with no experience around 
machinery as to the working of the machin- 
ery, but that he must point out to him the 
danger connected with his employment, not 
in a perfunctory manner, but in a manner 
that is both instructive and impressive, and 
that the law not only imposes upon the em- 
l)l()yer the duty of furnishing reasonably safe 
appliances originally, but also requires that 
he shall minimize the danger from the par- 
ticular kind of machinery which he is oper- 
ating. The court held in the case before it 
that where the employer could minimize the 
danger arising from the operation of machin- 
ery by screening it at a reasonable cost and 
without interfering with its operation, the 
law requires him to do so. 



Disgrace of Civilization." 

Dr. Edwin F. Bowers, in a dissertation on 
tuberculosis, declares that it is caused by 
poverty and malnutrition. Under the cap- 
tion of "Tuberculosis, the Disgrace of Civil- 
ization," in the Western Railway News, he 
writers : 

The splendid work of Dr. l-Lvans, of Chicago, 
in inil)lishing knowledge on this vital .sul)jcct, has 
stimulated emulation from physicians, health 
boards, district nurses' associations and civic 
imi)rovcment societies all over the country, and 
cfifectivc work is being accomplished in stamping 
out this disgrace of civilization, the Great White 
Plague. 

But (and here's the rub) while we know how to 
prevent and how to cure (in the early stages) 
the death rate shows no perceptible diminution. 
Why is this? 

Because we haven't attacked the basic cause 
of tuberculosis, poverty and malnutrition. Tiie 
wealthy <lo occasionally die of it, but in pro- 
portion of one to seven. The poor, overworked, 
underfed wage slave pays triintte to this modern 
Minotaur — devouring the fairest and most prom- 
ising of youth. Of what avail the physican's 
counsel to "rest up," sleep in the open air, "force 
feed" upon rich, nutritious diet and live a whole- 
some natural life, to a poor shop girl or a mill 
operative toiling twelve hours a day in vitiated, 
lint-laden, super-saturated atmosphere, from 
wliich the greater |)ortion of o.xygen has long 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of .\merica, lyi 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, III, 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime BIdg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Marl- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gadc 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterrcichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Bufjues v pucrto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

i"'ederacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Firt 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The State Scliool Teachers' Union 
in Victoria has decided to appoint a 
paid organizer, with a view of obtain- 
ing an increase in salaries. 

The police force at Perth, \V. A., 
want a raise in wages of Is. 6d. a day 
on account of the increased cost of 
living, and are asking for the support 
of organized labor. 

The Miners' Congress in England 
has carried resolutions in favor of 
State-paid inspectors being elected 
by the workmen, a minimum wage, 
and the nationalization of mines. 

General order is being maintained 
throughout Spain. The number of 
strikers is diminishing and the gen- 
eral strike declared on September 21 
appears to have failed. 

The boys employed sweeping the 
streets of Melbourne, Aus., struck re- 
cently in consequence of higher wages 
being refused. They formed a pro- 
cession and marched through the city. 

Sydney (Aus.) shop assistants arc 
up in arms at the delay of the wages 
board in bringing out their award. 
and threaten to strike unless the Min- 
ister for Labor intervenes and hastens 
matters. 

Twenty-five hundred woodworkers 
employed in the shipyards at Belfast 
have secured an increase in wages. 
They also received a guaranty that 
there would be no reduction in the 
rate of wages for five years. 

Five hundred delegates, represent- 
ing all the Austrian railway men's so- 
cieties, have decided that a demand 
for a twenty per cent, increase in 
wages shall be made to the Govern- 
ment. The high cost of living, it was 
declared, made the increase neces- 
sary. 

-After being on strike for three 
weeks, the men who were emplo3'ed 
at Metter's stove factory, Alexan- 
dria, N. S. W., have returned to work. 
The union's proposals were accepted 
by the management of the company, 
and a mass meeting ratified the 
agreement drawn up. 

A dispatch to the General-Secretary 
of the General Federation of Trade- 
Unions of Germany announces that 
the great industrial struggle in Nor- 
way has been finished with a good 
success for the workman. The con- 
flict in Norway has been long and 
stubbornly contested by both sides. 

A federation of transport workers 
has recently been formed in Bulgaria. 
There are now affiliated the unions of 
railwaymen, post, telegraph, telephone 
and tramway servants, dockers, 
teamsters, motor drivers and all other 
laborers employed in any branch of 
the traffic and transport trade of the 
country. 

The introduction of trade-unionism 
into Servia has brought about many 
changes for the better among the 
working classes. The greater benefits, 
as far as hours of labor are con- 
cerned, have been secured by those 
working in factories, a class that has 
embraced unionism to a much larger 
extent than those engaged in otlier 
lines of business. 

The Victorian Minister of Educa- 
tion stated in Parliament recently that 
he was causing in(iuiries. to be made 
into allegations contained in an ar- 
ticle in Melbourne Age, that little 
children were being treated on dairy 
farms as no Christian children should 
be, in many cases having to work 
from daylight, and late at night, and 
attend school in between times of 
work. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 



Headquarters for 
UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING 
Special Low Price on 
SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 



MEN 



SAN PEDRO 



California 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

-427 l-ROINT STREET SA.'N K>EDRO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro Letter Lut, 



.Vnilfrsen. Axil K. 
.Anderson, A. -H47 
.Anderson. V. -16."0 
-Anibre. Francesce, 
5r.5 



KalDW. Rolifrt 
Karlson. Kagnnr 
Lister. W. 
I.utten, Theo. -1B53 
I.^rsen, Maxsle 



Andersson. O. -1363 I..arsen. Kristian 
Anderson. Anders I..udviksen, A. -K'4!t 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
■yttp^-iliLIi^io* 'las loose labels in his possession and offers 

^G/STEHv- to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 
Medicines, Soaps and Toilet Articles 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT 

SAN PEDRO, CAL,. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

Wa Call and Deliver 

The French Dye Works 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, CaL 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Alex Eduard Malmberg, born 
Malmo, Sweden, 50 years old, tall, 
blond. Mr. Malmberg has been a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific in 1908. 

Torgen Sophus Thomsen, born in 
October, 1886, at Sonderburg, Schles- 
wig-Holstein, Germany, last heard of 
in April, 1907, at Montreal, is inquired 
for by his parents. Address Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building, San Francisco. 



Andersen. Hans C 
Anderson. Sam 
Anucrssen, Hildin^ 
Anderson. Chas. 
Berndt. Hugo 
BerK. H. T. 
BerKKicn. Otto 
Buihtman. F. 
Boardson. S. 
Biilander, B. B. 
B<"rnlsen, Fred 
Berner. Axel 
BackUind, .lohn 
Carlson. Oskar 
Christensen, A., 

-1325 
Christensen. L., 

-1360 
Clii istensen 
DauKiil, A. 
Dempse.v. Harry 
E( kart. Th. G. 
Erickson. Edward 
KiiKstrom. Richard 
Eugene. John 
Foi-s. A. 
Frank. Maurice 
Fuss, H. 
Felsch. Chas. 
Fasiff. Don 
Fischer, \V. 
Fischer. J. -566 
Glaase. Gustav 
Gouda, C. 
Oi-avier. Eugene 
■Oiaf. Otto 
Hansson. .Johannes 
Hansen, Nikolai 
Tlagen. Sigurd 
Hovev. Andrew 
Halsten, Axel 
HnlniPs. Oscar 
flnnsen. Almar 
Holmes. Alex. 
Holm. Carl 
H Pit wood, O. S. 
Halvorsen. H. E. 
Hansen. Berger 
Tlojrlund. J. A. 
Hod. Fred 
Trwin. Robert 
Tnfofssen, ,Ion 
,Iohn,son, Gunnar 
.Tacohsen. John 
.Tohnsen, Ernst 
.Tohnson. Tvouis M. 
.Tolinson. Hans -142 



Lalne. E. 
T-under, BJorn 
Murie. T. 
Muhlberg. Arnold 
Madsfn. M. J. 
Martin. Wm. 
Makinin. Karl 
Mathiesen. N. -1296 
Marlinsen, Martin 
Meyer. H. -U92 
Malmgren, E. 
McUae. A. 
Mellerup. Jens 
Meyer, H. -1792 
Martin, John B. 
Miller. Charles 
Nyman. Gustav 
Nielsen. Lauritz 
LorentzOchmichen. Fred. 
Olsson, A. P. -1109 
Olsen. Harry -766 
Ossls, Andrew 
Olsen. O. S. -1123 
Olsen, Anders 
Olsen, Hans C. 
Peterson, John 
Petersen. Lauritz 
Peterson. O. 
Rasmussen, S. Soren 
Richter. Richard 
Roed. Leif 
Raymond. J. 
Strahle, Carl 
Slevers. Herman 
Sandseter. Henry 
Schneider. Henry 
Smith, ai. 
Salo. Chas. A. 
Stube. Harry 
Sandell, John 
Slattery, W. H. 
Stephan. M. -145,5 
Swansson. Hugo 
Sundstrom, F. 
Scott, Ed. 
Samuelsen. Victor 
Snow. W. 
Smith. J. S. 
Thorsen, Johannes 
Tillman. Charlie 
Thornlund. John 
TTdbv, Harald 
THby, Carl 
Wasserman. Hans 
W'assemian, M. -1262 
Youngson. E. 
Yuhnke. W. (Reg. 



.Tohansen. Ernest 
Jones. Harry 
Tohnson. .T. A. 
Klahn. K. 
Kiisik. M. 
Kallas. A. -921 
Klnc. W. B. 
Kallas. Martin 
Krinkel. J. 
Kuhne. W. 



r,etter I». O.) 
Zlmmer. Walter 
Zimmerman. Fritz 
Zornlng. Arthur 

Photos and Packages 

Grossl. .Toe 
Pothoff. Harrv 
Raustanius, .T. 
Schultz. .\lbert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




INFORMATION WANTED. 
Hans Merz, who went to Alaska in 
the spring of 1910 on the schooner 
Ottilie Fjord, and upon return left the 
vessel in Tacoma and has not been 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Will Martin Billington, who was 
employed at Hallverville Cannery last 
summer, communicate at once with 
F. R. Wall, attorney for Otto Schel- 
lin, 324 Merchants' Exchange, San 
Francisco? 

A.idrew \ndersen, a native of Twe- 
destrand, Norway, is inquired for. 
■Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Peter Nielsen, from .Aarhus, Den- 
mark, is inquired for by Christ Han- 
sen, 230 W. Thirty-second street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 

The U. S. District Court in New 
Orleans has decided the case of John 
Kauer vs. the SS. Dover in favor of 
the libelant, and the New Orleans 
Agent has collected the money. Any 
one knowing the address of John 
Kauer, please communicate with the 
Sailors' Agent in New Orleans, 
George C. Bodine, 514 Dumaine St. 

Lott Bartlett Walls, who has been 
sailing for years between San Fran- 
cisco and China, is inquired for by 
his brother, John M. Walls, 2722 
Thomas street, St. Louis, Mo. 

John Percy Bawden, age 29: 7 
years on the Pacific Coast; last 
known address 52 Mission, is inquired 
for by his mother, Mrs. Bessie Baw- 
den, 5 York Rd . Seacombe, Ches- 
hire. England. 

M. Samuelson, born in Gottenborg, 
Sweden, age about 44, last heard of 
in Honolulu, is inquired for by his 
nephew, A. Johnson. Address, Sail- 
ors' Union of the Pacific, San Fran- 
cisco. 

John J. GrifTin, No. 8107. L. S. U., 
last heard of at Baltimore, Md.. in- 
quired for by his sister, Mrs. Allen, 
4749 Ontario St.. Chicago, HI 

Richard Standish, an English en- 
gineer, who left the S. S. Kansas 
City in July, 1909. Information want- 
ed by British Consulate, San Fran- 
cisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Jacob Kittlesen has been appointed master of 
the steamer Chehalis, vice C. J. F. Klinker; 
George H. Zeh of the steamer Montana, vice 
C. C. Moore; George Wright of the steamer 
Nevadan, vice Ernest Anderson. 

Word was received at the Mare Island Navy 
Yard on September 27 that the equipment and 
machinery of the Risdon Iron Works, of San 
Francisco, has been purchased by the Govern- 
ment, and it will be used in addition to the plant 
there. 

The Northwestern, the last steamer to leave 
Nome this month, will bring out $1,000,000 in 
gold dust and will carry also all the persons who 
do not intend to winter in the northern camp. It 
is estimated that 2000 persons will remain in 
Nome, as against 2600 last winter. 

The steamer Yucatan, to which the Steamship 
Inspectors refused a passenger license, sprung a 
leak, and came near foundering at sea on her 
voyage just completed between Nome and Se- 
attle. The vessel was saved, but not until dam- 
age to the extent of $10,000 had been done to 
her cargo. 

Walter Jorgensen, managing owner of the 
schooner Jessie Minor, filed a libel in the United 
States District Court at San Francisco, Septem- 
ber 26, against Libby, McNeil & Libby to recover 
$9605 for the loss of his schooner while carrying 
freight for the defendants from San Francisco 
to Alaska. 

Notwithstanding the fact that this is an off 
year for the sockeye salmon run, the run of other 
varieties of fish has enabled the canneries to 
make a good pack. Indeed, the pack of "pinks" 
this year beats all the records of the past. The 
pack of 750,000 cases is nearly twice as great as 
that of any preceding year. 

The rumor that the Matson Navigation Com- 
pany contemplates placing passenger carriers in 
service between the Sound and Hawaiian ports 
is not substantiated at the head office of the firm 
at San Francisco. Reports from Seattle stated 
that the company expected to establish a regular 
line of passenger steamers out of the Sound. 

Launched on July 31 at Glasgow, Scotland, the 
new steamer Robert Dollar, largest and latest 
of the Dollar Steamship Company's fleet, arrived 
at San Pedro on September 29, fifty-six days from 
Antwerp, via London, under command of Cap- 
tain R. L. Morton, carrying 6000 tons of miscel- 
laneous cargo for San Pedro, San Francisco, Se- 
attle and Vancouver, B. C. 

Wliat is claimed to be the largest cargo of 
foreign sugar ever received at San Francisco was 
brought by the Norwegian tramp August, Cap- 
tain P)jurck, which arrived on September 29, fifty- 
six days from Souraboya via Moji. The ship- 
ment included 21.051 baskets and 20,723 bags, 
and is valued at nearly $1,000,000. The duty on 
the importation amounts to $300,000. 

When the Pacific Mail liner Siberia left Hono- 
lulu it was expected that the wrecked steamer 
Empress of China, previously reported, would be 
refloated. One attempt had been made to move 
her, but she only shifted a few feet and nasty 
weather interfered with the salvage operations. 
There are hopes, however, that the Empress will 
be brought off from her dangerous position. 

On the bleak and lonely shores of Spanish 
Island, the steamer Ramona, of the Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company, now lies a total wreck, the 
officials having abandoned her after getting what 
they could out of the vessel. An effort may be 
made to save the boilers and gear, but nothing 
will be done in that direction until next spring. 
The divers, with considerable difficulty, saved the 
treasure cargo of the lost vessel. 

R. Y. Cadmus, United States Wireless In- 
spector at San Francisco, has announced the 
addition of two new signals to the international 
code. Z. M. X. means "wireless telegraph ap- 
paratus," and Z. M. Y. means "report me by 
wireless telegraph." The code, which is used by 
an arrangement through the Berlin agreement, 
contains many signals which are added to as the 
suggestions are deemed desirable. 

H. W. Culver, of the Citizens' Lumber Com- 
pany in Long Beach, has instructed his attorneys 
to draw up papers for the formation of a navi- 
gation company, which will have the local harbor 
as its main port of call. The capital stock will be 
$100,000. and local capitalists have given assur- 
ances of backing the concern, which will have 
two or more lumber schooners for the lumber 
and passenger trade of the Coast. 

The schooner Vega, of Seattle, had the most 
unfortunate experience of any of the codfishers 
this season. She returns reporting the loss of 
three of her men. Hans Larsen was washed over- 
board in a storm and drowned. T. Rogerty 
dropped dead of heart disease while lighting a 
cigarette. Gus Sunderson went violently insane 
during a storm and was put ashore at Unga in 
irons. The Vega was very successful financially, 
165,000 codfish being taken. 

The name of the steamer M. F. Plant, vviiich 
has been operating between San Francisco and 
the Sound, with the liners Buckman and Watson, 
since the Admiral Sampson was transferred from 
the coastwise run to the Alaskan route, is soon 
to be added to the rapidly growing list of oil- 



burning vessels on the Pacific. In November 
the Plant will be taken off the run for a short 
time for repairs and a general overhauling, which 
will include not only the installation of apparatus 
for oil burning, but a brand new set of boilers. 

Three new turbine twin-screw steamers, larger 
than the steamer Prince Rupert of the Grand 
Trunk Pacific fleet, are to be constructed in Eng- 
land this winter for use on the Portland Canal- 
Seattle and Victoria, Vancouver and Seattle runs. 
The new vessels, which will call at San Fran- 
cisco on their voyage out, are to be oil burners. 
Captain Barney Johnson, of the Prince Rupert, 
commodore of the Pacific fleet, is to be sent to 
England this winter to superintend the con- 
struction of the vessels. 

Arrangements have been made for the con- 
struction of a wireless station at Port Stanley, 
Falkland Islands, capable of communicating with 
the wireless station at Punta del Este, near 
Montevideo, and it is hoped that the new station 
will be in working order early next year. Hither- 
to many days have elapsed before news has been 
received at Liverpool of a vessel having put into 
Stanley owing to the unsatisfactory telegraph 
facilities, but when the new installation is oper- 
ating the Islands will be in daily touch with the 
outside world. 

It is reported that the Union Steamship Com- 
pany, which operates the steamers Aorangi and 
Maitai between San Francisco and Wellington, 
will replace the latter vessel with the steamer 
Port Kingston. The Port Kingston has been 
running in the mail service between England and 
Jamaica and is said to be admirably suited for 
passenger service, most of the accommodations 
being on the bridge deck. The liner will be re- 
named the Tahiti and will leave England for New 
Zealand in about a month's time after alterations 
have been made to fit her for her new service. 

What is said to be but a forerunner of many 
special steamship excursions which will be made 
from San Francisco to the Canal Zone during the 
next few years, was announced recently. The 
well-known Panama line steamer Peru has been 
selected to inaugurate the service as a feeler. 
The Peru will be placed in first-class condition 
for the unusual voyage and will steam from San 
Francisco on Octolaer 28 for Balboa direct. The 
excursion will extend over thirty-five days. The 
fare of $175 includes all expenses on the voyage, 
as well as a week's stay at the Tivoli Hotel in 
Panama. 

The officers of the ship Star of Alaska, which 
has arrived at San Francisco, 13 days from Chig- 
nik, brought details of the dynamiting of the ship 
Jabez Howes of the Columbia River Packers' As- 
sociation, which was blown ashore in a gale at 
Anchorage Bay. The ship Benjamin F. Packard 
grounded in the same storm in which the Howes 
was lost, but was refloated without damage. As 
the Howes was entirely submerged and it was im- 
possible to get to her cargo, large charges of 
dynamite were placed in her hold and exploded 
with electric current furnished by the salvage 
steamer. As each charge was set off tons of 
water was thrown into the air and the vessel re- 
duced to wreckage. In this manner the greater 
part of the cargo, which consisted of cannery sup- 
plies and provisions, was recovere-d. The Star of 
Alaska brought 38,357 cases of salmon. 

After a summer's work in Alaskan waters, the 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey vessels 
are preparing to return to Seattle. The Gedney, 
Patterson, Explorer and McArthur will be towed 
direct to the Sound next month and will prob- 
ably winter there. The Gedney, which has been 
operating off Ketchikan, is expected to be the 
first to come home. The Patterson has been at 
work off Sannak Island and will be the next to 
leave the scene of her summer's operations in the 
North. She will be followed by the Explorer, 
which has been working at Kuskokwim Bay, and 
the McArthur, which is at Cook's Inlet. The 
United States steamer Yukon, Captain Hardy, 
which is at Cook's Inlet; the Taku. Captain G. T. 
Rude, which is at Prince William Sound, and the 
launch Cosmos, now at Frederick Sound, will 
winter in the North. 



SAILORS READ THIS! 

A company owning over twenty-one square 
miles of rich, well-watered lands, all free of debt, 
wants you to join them in raising sugar cane and 
cattle. You are guaranteed 6 per cent interest 
and you also share in the big dividends. 

Certificates are $100 each, payable cash, or $2 
each month until paid. 

Here is Your Chance to Make Money. 
Share in the profits of this great ranch. Secure 
an INCOME FOR LIFE. 

Write for free booklet. 

LOS HORCONES PLANTATION CO. 

710 Grosse Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg.. Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



WM. H. FRA2IER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., I'/^A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me.. 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS ANL ^TER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE. Md.. 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va.. 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 Broad. 

Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 53 St. Anne St. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 570 West hake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO. O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
MARINE CITY, Mich., P. O. Box 773. 
PORT HURON. Mich., 517 Water St. 
HURON, O., Lake Seamen's Union. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 316 Kinzle St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, WLs., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O.. Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1101 W. Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. 111., 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA. O.. 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO. O., 54 Main St. 
DirrnoiT. Mich. 7 East Woodbridge St. 
I'T. iniRON. Mich.. 517 Water St. 
CONNMOAITT. O., 922 Day St 
OcniONSHUnG. N. Y., 70 I.sabella St. 
N. TONAWANOA. N. Y.. 152 Mnlii St 
SirPloniOIt. Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
HAY CITY. Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St 

SOUTH CHICAGO. 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WA LTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montlis - - tl.OO 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Clianges in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco PostofHce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAIv, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1911. 



I'.OTH SIDES OF THE CASE. 



The two letters from Brother J. J. McNa- 
mara to Walter Macarthur and Andrew Fu- 
ru.seth. respectively, were published in last 
week's issue of the Eabor Clarion by order of 
the San Francisco Labor Council. In order 
that the public may learn both sides of the 
ca.se. we reproduce the letters in this issue, 
accompanied by the reply. 

The motive of the Labor Council in order- 
ing^ the jjublicalion of these letters is easily 
determined. The time had passed for tlie let- 
ters to have any effect upon the political cam- 
j)aij^n ; consec|uently the only effect to be an- 
tici]iated was that of reflection upon the men 
to whom the letters were written. This mo- 
tive is made clearer by the fact that the Labor 
Council refused the request of Comrade I'uru- 
seth tliat his reply be also published. 

'i"hc motive of the letters themselves is 
e(|ually clear, namely, to silence opposition to 
the candidacy of a certain man by force of an 
ajjpeal from behind prison bars. That the let- 
ters were inspired is plain on the face of them. 
The misfortune and helplessness of Brother 
McXamara were taken advantage of to force 
him into a controversy in which he had no 
real interest. That the result could only be 
harmful to Brother McXamara was evidently 
a matter of no concern to those who inspired, 
and i)ractically dictated his action. Here we 
have a new trick in politics, one well worthy 
a place besi<le those other methods of chicane 
for which their creators have long been fa- 
mous. 

.\ conclusive evidence of the influence at 
work upon McXamara is contained in the 
fact that his letters bear inherent traces of 
another hand, the hand that is visible in sev- 
eral (>ther letters addressed to Macarthur and 
I'urnscth by representatives of labor in Los 
Angeles, If further ptoof of the inspiration 
of these letters were needed it may be found 
in the following letter from Clarence S. Dar- 
rovv. leading counsel for the McNamaras: 

September 21st, 1911. 
Mr. Andrew Fiiru.seth, 

44-46 Kast Street. San Francisco, Cal. 
My Dear I-'uruseth: 
I understand a letter was sent to you from here 



yesterday. I did not see it and did not know of 
it until to-day, and if T had, I should not have 
permitted it to be done. 

I know, however, you can appreciate the feel- 
ings and conditions of the man who sent it. and 
that he was influenced entirely by some one who 
did not understand the situation. 

I have often talked witli you about the political 
situation, and while at first I was sorry that you 
saw it in that way, still I have come to realize 
the whole matter more clearly than I did, and 
can not say that I think you are wrong, or even 
that I think you are not acting for the best so 
far as we are concerned. I talked this matter 
over fully with Older last night, and I wish you 
would see him and hear what I said about it. 

I want you to know that I have so much con- 
fidence both in you and your judgment that I 
would not advise any one trying to influence you 
in the matter. I know you have very broad views, 
and I am thoroughly familiar with that situation, 
and that no one is more devoted to the general 
cause. 

With kind regards, I am as ever, 
Your friend, 

C. S. HARROW. 

It is hardly necessary to say that the letters 
from Los Angeles did not produce the desired 
effect. On the contrary, the motives and 
metiiods evinced by these letters simply con- 
firmed the recipients in their judgment of 
tliat course which was best calculated to serve 
the true interests of labor. The outcome of 
the cam|)aign shows that this judgment is 
shared by a large majority of the people of 
San I'Vancisco, including a large ])art of the 
so-called "labor vote." 

The letters from Los Angeles, or rather the 
replies thereto, have had one good effect, 
namely, to draw the attention of the peo])le 
of that city to the difference between the po- 
litical issues there and in San Francisco. It 
is satisfactory to know that our friends in Los 
Angeles are now of the same mind as our- 
selves upon this score. However, the letters 
from Los Angeles, and especially the Mc- 
Xamara letters, remain as an evidence of po- 
litical trickery as contcnijitible as it is cunning, 
for whicii the "L'nion Lal)or" politicians of 
-San I'rancisco are jirimarily rcsponsil)le. 



Cf:)X\EXTIOX DELIiGATES. 



The .Sailors' l'nion of the Pacific will short- 
ly elect five delegates to the convention of the 
International Seamen's l'nion of America. 
This year's convention will be by far the most 
important in the history of the International. 
It is therefore of the highest im])ortance that 
the Sailors' L'nion be represented by the ablest 
members available for that purpose. Every 
(ither question of eligibility should be made 
secondary to the (|uestion of experience and 
ability. 

A communication in the.se columns last week 
contained the statement that the Secretary of 
the Sailors' l'nion (acting in tiie capacity of 
President of the International ) and the Editor 
of the JouRN.xr. are by the law of the Inter- 
national entitled to attend the convention at 
the expense of the latter. This is a mistake. 
The International does not pay the expenses 
of the President. The President of the Inter- 
national must be elected as a delegate from 
bis l'nion ; otherwise he can not attend. Of 
course, if the President be elected by his 
Union, the latter must pay his expenses. In 
the case of the Editor, when he attends the 
convention as such he is given a voice but no 
vote. The Editor has not attended the In- 
ternational convention during the past three 
years for the reason chiefly that he did not 
consider his services, under such a restriction, 
worth the cost involved. 

.Should the .Sailors' Union consider it ad- 
visable that either the Secretary or the Editor 
siiall be in attendance at the coming conven- 
tion there remains but one way in which the 
attendance of either can be assured, namely, 



by electing them as delegates, upon a basis of 
equality with all other delegates. In this con- 
nection the Journal would simply repeat its 
suggestion that in the choice of representa- 
tives the members should be governed .solely 
by consideration of fitness in the respective 
candidates, irrespective entirely of personal 
likes or dislikes. The .Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific is a thoroughly democratic organiza- 
tion. The oldest member is no better than 
the youngest in respect to his .standing before 
the membership. Loyalty, exjierience, ability 
— these constitute the only proper grounds of 
preferment. The attempt to set up any other 
standard is an attcmi)t to e.stablish discrimina- 
tion and favoritism, which is bound to result 
in harm should it be encouraged by the mem- 
bers. 



TWO LETTERS. 



County Jail, Los .\ngeles, Cal., 
September 19, 1911. 

Walter Macarthur, 44-46 East street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Dear Sir and Brother: Since being 
forcibly and unlawfully brought to the State of 
California, I have been greatly interested in the 
affairs in this section of the country, as they ap- 
plied to the advancement of our common cause. 
It goes without saying that even before my pres- 
ence here. I was interested in a general way in 
the tnany matters of interest to the organized 
workers of the entire Pacific Coast, and particu- 
larly in the coming municipal elections in both 
San Francisco and Los Angeles. 

Being desirous of seeing success crown our ef- 
forts. I have endeavored to keep in close touch 
with the situation, and am deeply grieved at the 
division in our ranks in San Francisco, which 
press and other reports state is liable to result 
in the defeat of the Union T,abor administration 
that has been in ofifice for the past two years. 

.•\fter considering the situation from every 
viewpoint and discussing it with those whom T 
know arc honest and sincere, it occurred to me 
that it might he well for me to write you and 
endeavor to urge upon you the necessity of a 
united front among the toilers of the Pacific 
Coast at this particular time, in a political way, if 
their best interests are to he protected and their 
past achievements conserved. 

I know that you are aligned with those who 
are opposed to the continuance in power of the 
Union Labor administration in San Francisco. 
I know the complications, many of them purely 
loc-il, that a situation like that entails; I also 
know that political ties are hard to break, partic- 
ularly in such strenuous times as the present, 
but. — 

I also know the vast interests organized labor 
has at stake at this writing, not only in San 
Francisco and Los Angeles, but on the entire 
Pacific Coast, from Vancouver, B. C, to San 
Diego, Cal. 

Casting personalities and localism and individ- 
ualities aside, you know and I know the general 
import that will be attached to the defeat of the 
Union Labor party in San Francisco at this time. 
That being so, I have no hcsitjuion in requesting 
you to align yourself with your fellow workers, 
or at least to refrain from actively supporting 
the candidates of the fusion party, which is going 
to every length to annihilate the Union Labor 
party. 

.Mind you, this is no partisan letter; I am a 
citizen of Indiana, consequently not a voter of 
California: it is not a case of McCarthy or Rolph 
w'ith me: I have met Mr. McCarthy several times 
in a casual way, Mr. Rolph I have never met. I 
am eliminating the personal equation, am looking 
far beyond it. 

Say what we will, the result of the coming 
municipal election in .San Francisco is of vital 
interest to organized labor on the Pacific 
Coast, is being watched with intensity, and is 
fraught with great possibilities for weal or woe. 
Your election precedes the one in this city by but 
thirty days, and it can safely be said that they 
will both be history and have an indirect bearing 
on our case, in which we arc vitally Interested, 
for say what you w-ill, the opponents of our move- 
ment are endeavoring to influence the result so 
that it will be advantageous to their interests. 

This is not a personal letter in that it is not 
written in the hope of securing any personal ad- 
vantage to the writer. 

In addressing you, T am animated solely by 
the desire to do what in me lies to present a 
united front at this critical period in the history 
of the trade-union movement on the Pacific 
Coast, believing that to be requisite to success, 
and secure in the belief that we should be big 
enough and broad enough to adjust questions of 
policy and expediency within our own ranks in 
our ow'n way. 

I am willing to suffer any ignominy that our 
opponents may be able to inflict, but could bear 
such burden with much better grace did I know 
that our cause had the backing of a solid iihalan.x 
on the political as well as on the industrial field. 

That I am asking you to make a sacrifice ot 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



generous proportions, I well know, but the history 
of all accomplishments is one long line of sacri- 
fices by big, broad, capable individuals, who, by 
their unselfish actions have made it possible for 
their successors to enjoy a better day than was 
their privilege during the period of their activi- 
ties. 

While I know that you are very, very busy, I 
would appreciate a line by way of reply to the 
above request. 

With best wishes for the future success of the 
International Seamen's Union of America, and 
of yourself, I am. 

Fraternally yours, 

J. J. McNAMARA. 

P. S. — I deem it no more than right to say to 
you that I am also writing Brother Andrew Furu- 
seth in a similar strain. 



County Jail, Los Angeles, Cal., 

September 19, 1911. 

Andrew Furuseth, 44-46 East street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Dear Sir and Brother: You will, no 
doubt, be surprised to hear from me, particularly 
on the subject matter I have in mind. 

Needless for me to say that I have always been 
interested in and proud of the strong and virile 
labor movement of the Pacific Coast and the 
many successes it has achieved in years gone by. 

I have always viewed with alarm the many 
strenuous efforts that have been made recently 
and are now being made at several points on the 
Coast to disrupt that movement that means so 
much to all of us. 

For many reasons, any one of which would be 
sufficient in itself, the present situation on the 
Coast is quite critical, in my estimation, both in 
a political and industrial way. 

Having heard that you are opposed to the re- 
tention in power of the Union Labor administra- 
tion, my object in writing you is to urgently ask 
you to change your attitude on this particular 
matter, or at least remain non-committal, so that 
we may present a united front to our opponents, 
for, argue as we will, that is the real classification 
for those who have fused against us. 

Understand me, now. Brother Furuseth, this is 
not a personal matter with me; I know McCar- 
tliy but slightly, do not know Rolph at all, am a 
citizen of Indiana, consequently not a voter in 
California, and it naturally follows that my in- 
terest is based on a genuine desire to see a 
solidarity that will redound to our continued ad- 
vancement, and confound the enemies of labor. 

Try to explain it away as we may, it is an 
acknowledged fact that there is a determined 
battle on between organized labor, on the one 
hand, and capitalized greed, on the other, from 
Vancouver, B. C., to San Diego, California, that 
has for its main objective point the crippling 
(we know they cannot eliminate us) of all our 
organizations on the Pacific Coast. 

That being so, and in view of the bitterness of 
our opponents, it can not be successfully contend- 
ed that the defeat of the Union Labor party in 
San Francisco at tlie coming municipal election 
will not be considered a slap at organized labor, 
and be heralded as such in no uncertain terms 
throughout the length and breadth of the land. 

I will so consider it, so will all our people, 
and we can rest assured that the employing in- 
terests will make the most of it in the campaign 
of annihilation. 

This is no time for splitting hairs, or for 
theorizing; it is a condition that confronts us; 
vast and vital problems are pressing for immedi- 
ate solution; and we must face them and dispose 
of them either favorably to our cause or other- 
wise; the contest in San Francisco precedes the 
one in this city by a few weeks, and they will 
both be disposed of definitely before our trial; 
rightly or wrongly the outcome of the first con- 
flict will have a bearing on the second, and joint- 
ly they will have an indirect yet powerful influ- 
ence on the trial that is to be staged here short- 
ly, in the hope of discrediting, not an individual 
or two, but the movement that means so much 
to us. 

Understand me. I am not addressing you for 
personal advantage, for we are ready and able to 
meet any fate that powerful opponents and biased 
prosecutors (or persecutors) may be able, by 
force, to inflict on us. 

The sole object I have in view is to prevent 
our enemies from obtaining a temporary advan- 
tage, wliich would give them fresh vigor to carry 
on the battle with renewed energy on the Pacific 
Coast, and it is that spirit that actuates mc. 

By way of illustrating my point, let me quote 
a telegram sent to the Governor of Indiana by 
the manager of the Moran Shipbuilding Company, 
of Seattle, Wasliington, shortly after my depor- 
tation. It is as follows: 

"I respectfully assure you of my own admira- 
tion, and the strong support of all true citizens 
here. Send all dynamite suspects hack to the Pa- 
cific Coast; rid your own State of them, and let 
Los .^ngeles deal with them. Finish the good 
work you began. Denounce those who condemn 
you.'" 

That is a fair expression of the sentiment of 
the employers on the Pacific Coast, and we can 
rest assured that it will be futile for us to look 
for a s(|uare deal, let alone any favors from offi- 
cials who are inducted into ofiice by those in- 
terests. The individual may be all right, but he 
will be a victim of circumstances; he will be 
powerless, he will listen to the dictates of his 
own cla.ss, first, last and all the time, and we may 
as well realize that now as at any other time. 



It has been thus in the past, and will continue 
so in the future, only in increased intensity. 

Sooner or later, if we hope to be successful, 
we will have to eliminate personalities and petty 
differences of policy, etc., when confronting our 
common enemy, and evolve a solution of them in 
our own ranks; why not start now? 

With your years of experience you realize the 
struggle that confronts us; you know the attitude 
of the United States Steel Corporation toward 
the men of your own craft on the Great Lakes; 
you know what has been their attitude toward 
our organization, as well as toward any organ- 
ization they come in contact with; you know 
that they, in company with several of the larger 
interests, are banded together to defeat us in our 
aims and aspirations, whether we arc on the .At- 
lantic or Pacific seaboard. That being so, it oc- 
curs to me that we can with good grace over- 
look a great deal in a personal way, like many 
sincere, broad-minded men before us have done; 
their spirit of self-sacrifice has resulted in untold 
benefits to those who came after them; we should 
be only too willing to follow in their footsteps. 

While I realize that your time is at a premium, 
I should like to have a few lines from you by 
way of reply. 

It may not be amiss for me to note that I am 
also writing Brother Macarthur in to-day's mail 
and on the same subject. Am in good health 
and spirits. 

With my very best wishes for the future suc- 
cess of the organization you have the honor to 
represent, and with kindest personal regards, I 
am, 

Fraternally and sincerely yours, 

J. J. McNAMARA. 



THE REPLY. 

San Francisco, Cal., September 22, 1911. 

Mr. J. J. McNamara, Los Angeles, Calif. Dear 
Sir and Brother: I am in receipt of your favor 
of 19th inst. I greatly appreciate your kindness 
in writing as you do, and profoundly regret that 
I am unable to concede your wishes regarding 
my attitude in the local campaign. , 

I know that it is unnecessary for me to say so, 
but I will risk a suspicion of over-protestation 
in declaring that there is nothing within honor 
which I would not do to aid you and your 
brother in securing a fair trial and speedy ac- 
quittal. 

If there had existed in my mind the faintest 
suspicion that my course were in the slightest 
degree inimical to your interests, I should never 
have entered upon it, or, having done so, I 
would change it instantly, no matter at what cost 
to myself or any other interest. 

You may rest assured that I have not acted 
without due reflection. I have lived in this city 
for more than twenty years, every hour of which 
period has been spent in the active service of 
the labor movement. I have been "through the 
mill," and know every angle of the labor move- 
ment in this city, perhaps as well as any other 
living man. 

My experience in a hundred fights enables me 
to see ahead and to determine my course with 
a view to its effects upon the future of our 
movement. 1 am now acting upon that expe- 
rience and with absolute assurance, in my own 
mind, that I am acting for the best interests of 
the labor movement. 

Of course, I may be mistaken; but I can not 
change my attitude in deference to the wishes 
of men who can not possibly know the facts of 
the local situation as do we who have lived in 
San Francisco all our lives. 

The fact is, there is no labor issue in the local 
campaign. The defeat of Mr. McCarthy will not 
be clue to any hostility toward organized labor. 
but to a general recognition of his utter incom- 
petency, and it will be brought about in part by 
the votes of thousands of union men who resent 
his attempt to "put the whip on 'em," as he ex- 
presses it. 

The issue being radically different here and 
in Los Angeles, the result in this city can have 
no effect upon the outcome in Los Angeles. I 
have suggested to those brothers in Los Angeles 
who have written me on the subject that their 
best course is to make clear to the voters in their 
city the difference between conditions in the two 
places, thus safeguarding themselves against the 
mistake of attributing any anti-labor significance 
to the result of the election in this city. 

I inclose herewith a copy of my last letter to 
Los Angeles, in which I have gone into the cam- 
paign issues in some detail. 

I feel satisfied that after you have read these 
communications you will acknowledge the sound- 
ness of my position and agree with me upon the 
impossibility of changing that position without 
incurring consequences that would be disastrous 
to c\'crything that the men of the labor move- 
ment hold dear, especially our reputation for hon- 
esty and disinterestedness. 

Again assuring you of my sympathy for you 
and your brother and my willingness to do every- 
thing in my power to aid you, coupled with con- 
fidence in the outcome of your great ordeal, I 
remain, Yours fraternally, 

WALTER MACARTHUR. 



Being in entire agreement with the above it is 
not necessary that I should write a letter. I 
wish you to accept this as coming from me as 
well as from Comrafle Macarthur. 
Faithfully yours 

ANDREW FURUSETH. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



San Francisco, Cal., October 2, 1911. 
Regular meeting came to order at 7:30 p. m., 
Geo. y. Stedman presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping medium. Quarterly Finance Committee 
elected. Nominations made for delegates to 1. 
S. U. .\. convention. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 
44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 25, 1911. 
Situation very encouraging. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
16.S Cordova St. West. P. O. Box 1365. 



Taconia .Agency, Sept. 25, 1911. 
No meeting: shipping fair; piospccts uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North .30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 25. 1911 
Shipjiing fair; prospects uncertain. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1.312 Western Ave. P. O. Bex 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend .Agency. Sept. 25, 1911. 
No meeting; no (|uorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229;/, Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



.Aberdeen Agency. Sept. 25, 1911. 
Shipi)ing and prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 2002. 



Portland. Ore.. .Agency. Sept. 25, 1911. 
Shipping slack and prospects poor. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 26, 1911. 
No meeting. Shinping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

JOHM W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



.San Pedro .Agency, Sept. 25. 1911. 
Shi[)ping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency. Sept. 19, 1911. 
Shipping good; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Ilcadciuartcrs, .San l'"r;incisco, Cal., .Sept. 28. 1911. 

Rcgldar weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m.. Ed, .Andersen in the chair. Secretary re- 
poi-ted shipping (]uiet. It was decided to send 
two <lelegates to the next International Seamen's 
Convention to be held in Baltimore, December 5. 
1911. Nomination of delegates will take place at 
the next regular meeting at headmiarters and ;it 
branches on or about October 5, 1911. The Quar- 
terly Finance Committee was elected. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 20, 1911. 
X'o meeting. Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
1003 Western Ave. P. O. Box 1335. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 

•San Pedro .Agency, Sept. 25, 1911. 
N'o meeting. Shipping slow; plenty of men 
ashore. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago. Sept. 25. 1911. 
.Shipping still very dull. 

VICTOR A. OLANDER, Secretary 
570 W. Lake St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Il.-adquarters, Boston, Mass.. Sept. 26. 1911. 
.Shipping good: men scarce. 

WM. H. I'RAZfliR, Secretary. 
lyi.A Lewis St. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^^'^^ 



ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*^'^* 



'HELLFARE" NEWS. 



The usual "Hellfare" happenings are be- 
coming stale news and collisions in the 
rivers are no longer interesting; they are 
too common among the "Hellfare" fleet. 
However, early in the morning of Septem- 
ber 22 the "Hellfare" steamer Joliet was 
rammed and sunk by the "Hellfare" steam- 
er Henry Phipps in St. Clair River. After 
sinking the Joliet the Phipps continued her 
erratic course down the river and rammed 
the steamer Alpena, damaging but not 
sinking her. On top of this comes the 
steamer Ontario, another "Hellfare" ship, 
which crashed into the sinking Joliet. 

This is the second accident of the kind at 
the same spot in the last few weeks. The 
City of Genoa was sunk under similar cir- 
cumstances a short time ago by the steam- 
er Gilbert of the Pittsburgh Steamship 
Company. 

The Joliet is 266 feet keel length, 38 feet 
beam and 24 feet deep. She was built in 
1890. The Phipps is one of the later built 
boats of the fleet, being 4 years old. She is 
580 feet keel length, 58 feet beam and 32 
feet deep. Her carrying capacity is 12,000 
tons, more than three times that of the 
Joliet. The Ontario is a vessel of 10,000 
tons capacity and the Alpena 3,000 tons ca- 
pacity. 

The Alpena is owned by the Wyandotte 
Transportation Company of Detroit, the 
Ontario by the Northern Lakes Steamship 
Company. 

The Alpena carried a crew of union sea- 
men. All the other ships were "Hellfare" 
manned. Of course, the usual "fog" was 
given as an excuse. Now, the Cleveland 
Leader of September 23 says in part: 

After the collision the tug Sarnia City was 
sent outside and all down-bound steamers were 
given orders to wait out there until the fog 
cleared. The Sarnia City will lie at anchor just 
above the wreck to-night, and in case it should 
get foggy she will keep all down-bound ships 
outside. The wreck lies about 400 feet from the 
Canadian shore, and all up-boun<l steamers should 
take the Canadian side and the down-bound boats 
the American side. Captain W. W. Smith, super- 
intendent of the Pittsburg Steamship Company, 
will be here to-morrow morning to take charge 
of the wreck. (Get that right? "And in case it 
should get foggy." Oh, well!) 

This is the third boat that was sunk in the 
rivers during the past two months in which the 
Pittsburgh Steatnship Company was interested. 
The steamer J. W. Gates sent the steamer Tampa 
to the bottom of the Detroit River at Walker- 
ville and the steamer W. H. Gilbert sunk the 
City of Genoa a short distance from where the 
collision occurred yesterday. 



Both Captains Suspended. 

Detroit. September 22. — Responsibility for the 
collision of July 9 last between the steamers 
John Mitchell and \Vm. Henry Mack, off Ver- 
niilion Point, Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior, is 
divided between the masters of the vessels by 
the verdict of Captain Charles M. York and 
Charles M. Gooding, United States local inspec- 
tors of steam vessels at Mar(iuette, Mich., al- 
though the greater burden of blame seems to 
be placed on the master of the Mack. 

Suspension of license for thirty days is the 
penalty imposed on Captain John M. Massey, of 
Chicago, who was master of the Mitchell. The 
license of Captain George H. Burnham, of To- 
ledo, master of the Mack,* is suspended for twelve 
moiuhs. 

The Mitchell, down liound. and the Mack, go- 
ing up, came together in a dense fog. The Mit- 
chell filled and sank in 240 feet of water in a few 
minutes after the collision. Three of the crew 
were lost. 



Big Hole in Bow. 

Port Huron, .September 22. — Examination of 
the steamer City of Genoa, which was raised 



by Wrecking Masters Baker and Reid and now 
lies moored at the Sarnia dock, reveals a hole 
about fifteen feet long in the steamer's port bow, 
where she was rammed by the W. H. Gilbert the 
morning of August 26. 



Officers Exonerated. 

Toledo, O., September 21. — The licensed of- 
ficers of the steamer Philip Minch, of Cleveland, 
which sank the launch Nemo in Maumee Bay, 
September 2, drowning six city officials and an- 
other occupant of the launch, have been exon- 
erated of blame by United States steamboat in- 
spectors. 



Another boat of the Commonwealth Steam- 
ship Company may change hands this week. 
Local parties are figuring for the steamer William 
A. Hawgood, and it was reported yesterday that 
if the deal goes through the steamer will be op- 
erated by a Cleveland firm. The Hawgood, which 
was built in 1907, has been laid up at Buffalo 
since last fall. She is 552 feet over all, 532 feet 
keel, 56 feet beam and 31 feet deep. 

H the Hawgood is sold the Commonwealth 
Company will still have four big freighters. They 
are the steamers J. Q. Riddle, Sheldon Parks, H. 
A. Hawgood and Abraham Stearn. The steam- 
ers A. H. Hawgood and W. R. Woodford were 
sold to the Inland Steamship Company. The 
steamer H. A. Hawgood is the only boat of the 
fleet that is in commission. 



Testimony All In. 

Testimony in the trial of Captain Hoyt Town- 
send, master of the steamer Clement, which col- 
lided with and sunk the steamer Ervvin L. Fisher 
in the lower Detroit River on the night of May 
4, was concluded before the local inspectors of 
steamboats at Detroit Saturday. 

Local Inspectors Meno and Milne will consider 
the evidence gathered in the case and expect to 
make known their decision in a few days. 



The barge Martha will receive some minor re- 
pairs at the Lorain yard. 



.•\ petition was filed in the United Slates Dis- 
trict court at Detroit Monday by Robert Craig 
for the sale of the steamer .^di^amled, owned by 
F. A. Hubbard, of Toledo, to satisfy a libel of 
$3,000. The steamer was seized by the United 
States marshal at Port Huron August 25. 



The steamer W. A. Rogers, of the Mills fleet, 
struck at Two Harbors and damaged No. 5 tank 
on the starboard side. 



The steamer W. H. Gratwick ran into some 
construction work at Ft. William which is being 
done for the International Harvester Company. 
The vessel was not damaged. 



This is only part of one week's news of 
the "Hellfare" fleet. The number of the 
vessels in the Lake Carriers' Association 
which have not turned a wheel this year; 
the story of those which are being operated 
at a loss ; the heartbreaking efforts of their 
owners to hold on to their property and to 
defeat the attempts of the Steel Trust to 
confiscate ; the story of dissatisfaction and 
discontent among the men employed on 
them ; the bitter regret of the officers for 
their past conduct — is all a sealed book to 
us. All except such glimpses as we may be 
able to obtain from time to time in the un- 
guarded mutterings of the officers and crews 
shows us that all is not "beer and skittles" 
in the "Hellfare" fleet, and that the fight 
against "Hellfare" by the Seamen of the 
Lakes is not lost, but won. 

W. II. JlCNKI.VS. 

Conneaut, O. 



VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



United States Judge Denison at Grand 
Rapids on September 11 awarded the Chand- 
ler-Dunbar Company, of Sault Stc. Marie, 
approximately $700,0(X) for its property 
taken over l)y the Government for the con- 
struction of ship locks at the Son. The com- 
pany claimed that the property involved was 
worth more than $7,000,000. 



REFUSAL TO SUSPEND RATES. 



The necessity of Minnesota millers back- 
ing an independent fleet of package freight- 
ers to obtain transportation of flour at rates 
which they have been seeking was dispelled 
recently when the Interstate Commerce 
Commission refused to suspend the lower 
rate which is to become eflfective October 
5, on flour between Minneapolis and New 
York. 

Railroads that carry flour from Minne- 
apolis to Lake ports, whence it is shipped 
by water to Buffalo and thence by rail to 
New York, published a through tariff of 
21 1-2 cents which eastern roads operating 
boat lines fought and which they attempted, 
through the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion, to have set aside. Had they succeed- 
ed in getting the Interstate Commerce 
Commission to suspend the published tariff 
in favor of the old rate, 23 cents, the Min- 
neapolis Millers Association threatened to 
start a new boat line which would connect 
with eastern railroads. The boat proposi- 
tion will now be abandoned. 

W. P. Trickett. executive manager of the 
Minneapolis Traffic .Association, declares • 
that part of the ruling which holds that the } 
Commission has not the power to suspend a 
lawfully published tariff reducing rates to 
be of special significance. Under the deci- 
sion, according to Mr. Trickett, eastern 
trunk lines must henceforth treat all estab- 
lished Lake carriers as connecting lines. 
This he regards a severe blow against the 
control of the Great Lakes by established 
carriers. 



NEW SHOAL FOUND. 



According to information in the Lake 
Survey office at Detroit, the surveyor has 
discovered that Waverly Shoal, just outside 
the P)Uffalo harbor, is considerably larger 
than was thought. It is said to extend 
directly into the path of vessels entering 
and leaving Buffalo harbor. 

Waverly Shoal has been known as a 
small shoal to the northward of the charted 
sailing courses and has been marked by a 
gas buoy. The late survey shows that it 
extends seven-eighths of a mile in a south- 
easterly direction from the gas buoy. The 
water over the shoal in the vicinity of the 
vessel course had a minimum depth of 19 
feet 6 inches. 

Officials of the Lake Survey believe the 
discovery an important one, as the char- 
ted .sailing course will have to be revised, 
and all charts showing the eastern end of 
Lake Erie will have to be changed. 

Another shoal was also found and re- 
ported by the surveyor. It is L300 feet 
soutii and 70 degrees west of the main light 
at the north end of the old breakwater. 
The last depth reported for this shoal is 15 
feet and its surface is rocky. Though the 
shoal is 400 or 500 feet out of the regular 
channel, many of the lighter draft boats 
have been passing over it to save time. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE SCAB. 



Of all the pore benighted dubs 

The saddest is the Scab 
What works on bum nonunion tubs, 

Say, honest, he's a crab. 
The way he works would make you laugh, 

An' even if he'd try, 
He couldn't never earn one half 

What's paid the union guy. 

He'll eat the grub a Chink would spurn 

An' think he's lucky, too, 
He'll sleep on beds they oughta burn. 

Which same they never do; 
He's kicked an' banged around the boat 

Until he's sick an' faint, 
The Scab is sure a' awful goat, 

Although he thinks he ain't. 

I'm kind of sorry fer the Scab, 

He ain't so much to blame, 
Cheap jobs is all he has to grab. 

An' so he grabs the same. 
He's booted every place he goes. 

His life is very glum. 
Poor gink, I'm sorry fer his woes, 

— The low-down, dirty bum! 

— Berton Braley in Popular Magazine 



INSURANCE ON NORTHWEST. 



The Northern Steamship Company, own- 
er of the steamer Xorthwe.st, which was 
damaged by fire at Buffalo on June 3 
shortly before she was to start the season, 
has made a settlement with the insurance 
underwriters for the los.s sustained by the 
vessel. The underwriters paid the company 
$260,000. 

It would have been possible for the com- 
pany to have collected the full amount of 
its policies, about $290,000, by making the 
ship a total loss. There was an alternative 
and that was to have the vessel repaired 
by the underwriters. Both of these settle- 
ments would have been disadvantageous to 
the Northern Steamship Company. 

The Northwest was not insured for her 
full value and the company would have lost 
by abandoning the ship. On the other hand 
if she had been repaired by the underwri- 
ters she would have been rebuilt along the 
lines which she carried when burned. 

In accepting the cash settlement the 
owners have an opportunity to reconstruct 
the ship on new lines if they so desire and 
have the finances to do it without drawing 
upon the resources of the concern. 

No contract has yet been made for re- 
building the ship, but a number of plans 
are under consideration. It is probable that 
the ship will be sent to the shipyards in 
time to come out next spring and will have 
more extensive furnishings than she had be- 
fore the fire. The design of the cabins will 
also be somewhat changed, giving the vessel 
larger and better accommodations for car- 
rying passengers. 



LIGHT MARKS WRECK. 



J. H. Darling, principal assistant engi- 
neer in the office of the United States en- 
gineer, Duluth, informs the Lake Survey of- 
fice that the after section of the wrecked 
steamer W. C. Moreland, now lying inside 
the upper entrance and east of the channel 
in Portage Lake canal, is marked at night 
by a white light, maintained by the Reid 
Wrecking Company. 

The light is placed on a flagstaff on the 
extreme after end of the cabin. It is three 
and one-half feet above the cabin and ZSyi 
feet above the water. The hull stands from 
nine to 20 feet above water and the cabin, 
which is 80 feet long, is 25 feet above water. 
This part of the ship is a little more than 
200 feet long. 



OIL CARRIER LAUNCHED. 



Mrs. R. C. Viet, of New York, wife of the 
general manager of the marine department 
of the Standard Oil Company, christened 
the steamer Eocene, which was launched 
at the local yard of the American Shipbuild- 
ing Company recently. The oil carrier was 
dropped overboard wilhout any ceremony, 
and the launching party was made up of the 
officials of the Standard Oil Company and 
the shipbuilding company. R. C. Viet and 
W. E. Ford, of New York, were present. 

The Eocene is a duplicate of the steamer 
Perfection, which was also turned out at 
the Cleveland yard. The new boat is 260 
feet over all, 2.S0 feet keel, 43 feet beam and 
23 feet deep. She will have a triple-expan- 
sion engine with cylinders 24, 39 and 63 inch- 
es, with 42-inch stroke. Steam will be fur- 
nished by two Scotch l)oilers 14]/ feet in 
diameter and 11 56 feet long. 

The new boat, which will have 800,000 
gallons capacity, will go into commission 
late ip the sea.son. In. addition to the Eocene 
the American Shipbuilding Company is 
building five barges for the Standard. 



JOB NEARLY FINISHED. 



Superintendent Locher, of Grant, Smith & 
Locher Company, contractors on the "dry 
section" of the Livingstone Channel, re- 
ported to the office of Colonel C. McD. 
Townsend recently that the work would be 
completed by December 1 or soon after- 
ward. The channel will not be opened initil 
next spring, when a dredge can be used to 
remove the upper and lower ends of the 
cofferdam. 

Work began on the dry section of the 
channel in the spring of 1908. The amount 
of the Government contracts which the 
Locher firm has had on the channel amounts 
to more than $2,500,000. The sarne firm has 
secured a contract in New York, which will 
amount to about $4,500,000. Work is al- 
ready under way there. 



CAN NOT SELL BOATS. 



Until the directors of the American Ship- 
building Company either accept the steam- 
ers of the Commonwealth Steamship Com- 
pany or refuse to take them back as the 
stockholders of the steamship company de- 
mand, charging the contracts made when 
the steamers were ordered falsified, no sale 
can be made. Three different interests have 
been gathering information about some of 
the vessels with a view to buying. 



Suspension of his license as master and 
first-class pilot for five days from Septem- 
ber 19, is the penalty imposed by United 
States Local Inspectors at Toledo on Cap- 
tain Salem Robin.son, master of the steamer 
City of the Straits, for allowing his boat 
to get on the course reserved for the motor 
l)oat races at Put-in-Bay in August. 



The steamer F. J. Lisman, of the Harper 
Transportation Company of Boston, with 
the barges Searsport and Boston in tow, 
arrived at Fairport on September 23 from 
Detroit. They will load coal for Montreal. 
This will make the third tow of the Harper 
fleet to go to the Coast. The steamers were 
built at Ecorse. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persua- 
ding seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes arc sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas Reid, marine fireman, 45 Assump- 
tion street, Detroit, Mich., is inquired for by 
his mother. 



Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



The .schooner Donaldson has been char- 
tered for the balance of the season by Car- 
bray Sons & Co., of Quebec. The Donald- 
son will carry coal from Lake Erie ports 
to Montreal. The steamer Russell Sage will 
tow her. 



Demand the union label on all products! 



LAKE SEAMEN* S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 
570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
Telephone, Franklin 278. 
BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wi.s 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OODEN.SBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

ERIE, Pa 107 E. Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. 992 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 

HURON. O Lake Seamen's Union 

MARINE CITY, Mich p Q Box 773 

PORT HURON, Mich 517 Water Street 

KINGSTON, Ont Box 96 

HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland. Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven. Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

HouK'-'.on, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

TiUdington, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



"EL CAPITAN DEL PUERTO." 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



"notliin' (loin' " in the line of shark-catching, 
"Trawler" Pete grew perceptibly dejected. 
"Hope deferred niaketh the heart sick." Also, 
the way of the boaster is hard. He had now 
become the butt of everybody on board, all 
hands fore and aft merciles.sly guying him 
on his alleged prowess as a fisherman. 

"It's a foine fisherman yez be. 'Trawler' — 
Oi don't think," "Pimply" Duffy would blurt 
out with a malicious grin on his mottled 
phiz. "Begorrah, yez couldn't catch a cowld 
if all the doors an' windows in the house 
was open. An', moreover, Oi don't belave 
yez ivver made a walkin's shtick in )-er 
loife, ye bloody shpalpeen ; but if yez ivver 
do Oi hopes som'un will bate the shtuffin' 
ontcn yez wid it — or tache yez how to catch 
fi.sh." ' 

And the crowd would roar its approval of 
"Pimjily's" sallies. "Twas ever thus. Al- 
ways the crowd will gleefully jump on the 
man who fails. Nothing succeeds like suc- 
cess and, per contra, nothing fails like fail- 
ure. 

One morning "Old Manuel," the local Poo- 
Bah and, ex ofHcio, pilot of l>uena Ventura, 
came on board to pay his respects to the 
afterguard and, incidentally, wheedle the 
cook out of a chunk of salt horse. Pointing 
over the rail to tlie shark-hook, which he 
had cs])icd while coming alongside, he asked : 

"Wha' dat for?" 

It was explained to him that the liook 
was left there in the faint hope that the 
"mucho grande" shark might some time for- 
get himself and accidentally swallow the bait. 

An exi)rcssion of amusement crept over 
the wrinkled old features of Manuel. Look- 
ing over toward wlicrc his nibs, the shark, 
was serenely disporting himself, he said, 
with a chuckle : 

"ITim no nevva taka da l)ail — him savvee 
too muchee. Evva shi]) come here try catch 
him, but no posseebla. Da peopla ashore 
call him 'El Capitan del Puerto." Me savvee 
him long time — niebbe forty years, mebbe 
more. Him good keepa da harbor clean. 
Sup]K)se you no troubia 'El Capitan del 
Puerto,' him no troubia you. Evvabody 
ashore hava bath evva day, an" 'El Capitan 
del Puerto' him no troubia nobody. I tella 
you da truth ; supposee you treat him good, 
him dam good fellah." 

Then, with an clocjuent sweep of the 
hands to signify that the subject had been 
disposed of, he asked : 

"Wha' time you sail to .\capulco, cap- 
itan?" 

"()li, Monday morning." the skipper re- 
plied. 

".\!Ia right. I coma taka you out fife 
o'clock in da morning ; catclia da land breeze." 

"\'ery well, pilot." 

'I'iicn, knowing what the old codger was 
fishing for. the skipper turned to the cook 
and said : 

"Doctor, give Mr. Manuel a nice piece of 
salt beef — the best you can find in the har- 
ness cask." 

.After Manuel hacMeft, the shark-hook was 
hauled in and stowed away in the boat- 
swain's locker, everybody but "Trawler" 
Pete being satisfied that it was useless to 
try and catch such a wily old critter as "El 
Capitan del Puerto." As "Pimply" Dufify 
said : 

"Shure, that there cravthur knows as 



much as anny man, an' if 'Trawler' only had 
half as much brains as he has he'd nivver 
pother his head 'bout makin' walkin' 
shticks — he'd have 'em made to order loike 
anny man av sinse would." 

.All of which, we may be sure, rankled in 
the troubled breast of poor "Trawler" Pete 
as he turned his vengeful gaze in the direc- 
tion where "El Cai^itan del Puerto" lay bask- 
ing himself in the sun. 

At any rate, the first opportunity he got 
he fixed up an old, rusty harpoon which 
had been lying among a lot of junk and 
scrap iron down in the forepeak, probably 
since the day the ship was launched. After 
grinding the point and cross barb, and fitting 
a new staff to it. he made the end of the 
lanyard fast to a belaying pin and poised 
himself on the rail ready for a throw. Next 
he dropped a couple of hardtacks overboard. 

Pretty soon "El Capitan del Puerto" 
sidled up alongside and made for the hard- 
tacks. As he did so "Trawler" Pete let 
fly the harpoon. It buried itself almost out 
of sight in the body of the huge beast, near 
its dorsal fin. With a mighty bound and 
splash the creature headed for the bottom 
like a dart, leaving a blood-flecked streak 
in its wake. As the lanyard tightened, the 
belaying pin snapped ofT short, letting the 
lanyard run out. Cursing his bad luck and 
everybody and everything in general, 
"Trawler" Pete walked for'ard amidst the 
jeers of his shipmates, with the mien of one 
inwardly saying, "Never again." 

After an interval of several minutes the 
big, formidable-looking dorsal fin of "El 
Capitan del Puerto" appeared again above 
water some distance away from the ship. 
The shaftless harpoon was still buried in the 
monster, the shaft trailing behind him at 
the end of the lanyard. Efforts were made 
to coax him alongside by throwing scraps 
of food overboard, but in vain. Even when 
the cook threw a whole bucketful of slops 
over the side the wounded brute patiently 
waited until the stuff had drifted well astern 
with the tide before approaching it. Like 
all instinct-guided creatures he had quickly 
learned the lesson embodied in the old saw, 
"A burnt child shuns the fire." 

(^ne thing about him was noted, however, 
as the hours slipped by, which was so re- 
markable as to cause universal comment. 
Whatever side or end of the ship "Trawler" 
Pete was working on, there lie found the 
cold, beady, shiver-inducing eyes of "El Cap- 
itan del Puerto" staring at him from a little 
ways off with the inscrutable malignity of a 
chiseled, scaly Moloch. Vainly the "Traw- 
ler" strove to drive him away by heaving 
l)illets of wood or lumps of coal at him. 
Likf Poe's raven the finny leviathan declined 
to budge from his self-selected vantage 
ground, and had vocal organs been his he 
would no doubt have been overheard mut- 
tering dolefully "Nevermore" in response 
to the "Trawler's" palpable invitations to 
him to betake himself to — well, the ichthyic 
cciuivalent of dehenna. 

Sailing day arrived at last. Earlv at day- 
break, while yet the land breeze wafted its 
fragrant aromas seaward, the chain was 
hove short, the fore-yards backed, the jibs 
hoisted and their sheets hauled aft to 
windward. Old Manuel was impatiently 
fussing around on the maindeck, occasional- 
ly praying aloud, "Sopla, San Antonio, 
amigo de los marineros — pero no rompe los 
palos" (Blow, San Antonio, friend of the 
mariners — but don't break the masts). Pres- 



LA50R'S ECONOMIC PLnTrORM. 



I'"olIowing is the Economic Platform adopted 
l)y tile .American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free te.xt books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The aliolitioii of the sweat-shop syst,em. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United Stales Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Ranks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAIIEIM'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 165 Cordova St., West. P. O. 
Box LWS. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SE.\TTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 51 Union Ave.. Box 2100. 

EUREKA. Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408>4 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box B74. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building. P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, W'ash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wasli.. 1312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORI.\. Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

C'an lio pi'ocmTd by socimen .'\t 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



ently at sunrise the breeze freshened a bit. 

"What d'ye say, pilot — let her go?" the 
skipper asked. 

"Si seiior ; vamonos," replied Manuel, too 
pre-occupied to remember to speak "Ingles." 

"Break her out there, Mr. Jones," sang 
out the old man. 

"Aye, aye sir." 

"Pimply" Dufify struck up "Sally Brown" 
to the time of the clanking pawls of the 
windlass. In five minutes more the sten- 
torian tones of the mate bawled out from 
the forecastlehead : 

"The anchor's aweigh, sir." 

"All right, sir. Stand by the braces, and 
send one man aft to the wheel here." 

Slowly she fell ofif before the wind and 
gathered headway as the sails filled. In a 
little while the man at the wheel had her 
steadied and heading for the narrow channel 
leading out to sea. 

"Mr. Jones," presently spoke up the 
skipper, "send some one up on the foreyard 
to overhaul that there starboard leech line. 
She'll need every bit o' canvas she's got on 
her to get her out o' here before this land 
breeze dies away." 

"Aye, aye sir," responded the mate. "Here, 
you 'Trawler,' git up there on the fore yard 
an' overhaul that there leech line — an' take 
a piece o' twine with you and stop it up." 

As "Trawler" Pete went Up the rigging 
he instinctively looked behind him. Yes, 
there was "El Capitan del Puerto" keeping 
pace with the ship and towing the harpoon 
shaft. Surely that confounded shark wasn't 
going out to sea with them ! 

Cautiously the "Trawler" lay out on the 
yard until he reached the leech line and 
found the end of a roband twisted around 
it just above the block. With one eye on 
"El Capitan del Puerto," who was almost 
directly below him, and the other on the 
leech line block, he proceeded to clear away 
the roband when, suddenly, the seizing of 
the nearest stirrup broke! With a cry of 
terror that haunted his hearers for many 
moons after, "Trawler" Pete slipped off the 
footrope and fell backward into the water. 
Instantly the powerful, gaping jaws of "El 
Capitan del Puerto" closed over him and 
bore him down out of sight. 

"Ave Maria santissima ; ora pro nobis," 
shudderingly mumbled old Manuel, as he 
mechanically crossed himself. 

Away astern the bobbing harpoon shaft 
marked the spot where "El Capitan del 
Puerto" and "Trawler" Pete were enacting 
their little one-sided tragedy. 

Note — "El Capitan del Puerto" means 
"The Captain of the Port." A few days 
after the departure of the Beowulf the de- 
vourer of "Trawler" Pete vanished from his 
accustomed haunts forever. It was gen- 
erally surmised that, feeling the harpoon 
gnawing at his vitals, and sensing the near 
approach of death, he had quietly retired to 
some submarine cavern and there ended his 
days in the lonely statelincss befitting a 
monarch of the seas. 

El Tuerto. 



WORKINGMEN'S INSURANCE. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



Sour milk is said to keep fresh for months 
meat immersed in it, the lactic acid destroy- 
ing the germs of putrcfication. 



Don't forget to vote for the Workmen's 
Compensation amendment to the Constitution 
of California. NO. 10 ON THE BALLOT. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



ville near Birmingham. While the average 
death rate for all ages in England and 
Wales in the years 1902 and 1907 was 15.7, 
the death rate at Bourneville was 6.3 ; and 
yet the occupations of the inhabitants of 
Bourneville were fairly representative of 
the whole country. Over 50 per cent of 
the workers were factory hands ; 36 per cent, 
were mechanics, carpenters, bricklayers and 
others of unclassified occupations, and 
about 13 per cent, clerks and travelers. 

I^rof. Msher concludes also that on the 
average every American is sick thirteen 
days in the year. 

Possibilities of lengthening lives and of 
avoiding sickness and invalidity, like the 
possibilities of preventing accidents, will be 
availed of when business as well as hu- 
manity demands it. 

William Hard quoted Edgar T. Davies, 
the factory inspector of Illinois, as saying 
that in the year 1906 one hundred men 
were killed or crippled for life in the fac- 
tories of Illinois b}' the set-screw, and that 
for thirty-five cents in each instance this 
danger device could have been recast into 
a safety device. The set screw stands up 
from the surface of the rapidly revolving 
shaft, and as it turns catches dangerously 
hands and clothes. Eor thirty-five cents the 
projecting top of the set screw could be 
sunk flush with the rest of the whirling 
surface of the shaft, and then no sleeve 
could be entangled by it, and no human 
body could be swung and thrown by it. 

The South Metropolitan Gas Company, 
which established, in connection with its 
system of inquiry into all accidents with a 
view to their prevention, reduced the num- 
ber of accidents per thousand in seven 
years from 69 to 40. 

John Calder, of Ilion, New York, tells 
of the reduction of accidents in an Amer- 
ican plant from a yearly average of two 
hundred to sixty-four. 

Can there be any doubt that if every 
accident had to be carefully investigated 
and adequately compensated for, their num- 
ber would be reduced to a half or a third? 

Unnecessary Unemployment. 

And undoubtedly the paramount evil in 
the workingman's life — irregularity of em- 
ployment, — would yield in large measure 
to like treatment. 

The New York Commission in its recent 
report on unemployment gives data from 
the Trade Unions showing "that organized 
workers lose on the average twenty per 
cent of their possible income through un- 
employment," and data from the charitable 
societies showing that "from 25 to 35 per 
cent, of those who apjily to them for relief 
every year have been brought to their des- 
titute condition primarily through lack of 
work." 

Some irregularity in employment is 
doubtless inevitable; but in the main irreg- 
ularity is remediable. It has been over- 
come with great profit to both employer and 
employe in important businesses which 
have recognized the problem as one seri- 
ously demanding solution. Society and in- 
dustry need only the necessary incentive to 
secure a great reduction in irregularity of 
cm])loymcnt. In the scientifically managed 
business irregularity tends to disappear. So 
far as it is irremediable it should be compen- 
sated for like the inevitable accident. 



Consider how great would be the incen- 
tive to humanize social and industrial con- 
ditions if the cost of inhuman conditions 
were not only made manifest but had to 
be Iwrnc from day to day unless the inhu- 
man conditions themselves were removed. 

Mere description of the misery unneces- 
sarily entailed by the inhuman conditions, 
mere statements of cost however clear and 
forceful, will fail to secure the removal of 
these inhuman conditions in industry and 
in the life of our people from which this 
misery springs. But if society and industry 
and the individual were made to pay from 
day to day the actual cost of the sickness, 
accident, invalidity, premature death, or 
premature old age consequent upon exces- 
sive hours of labor, of unhygienic conditions 
of work, of unnecessary risks, and of irreg- 
ularity in employment, those evils would 
be rapidly reduced. 

Wc need a comprehensive system of 
workingmen's insurance as an incentive to 
justice. We need it: "Lest we forget." — 
Louis D. Brandeis. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



since l)ccn extracted and replaced by carbon 
dioxide? 

What sardonic cruelty (devilishly contrived as 
any in the pages of Greek mythology or Dante's 
Inferno) to show this doomed victim the beau- 
tiful vista of life, hope, health, happiness, a con- 
tinued loving sojourn among the quick, and then 
dash the cup to the ground, shattered in a thou- 
sand fragments, and proflfer him instead, bit- 
terness, futility and hopelessness of his lot un- 
der "J'Zconomic Determinism." 

For his fate is pre-determined by his economic 
condition. If he is able to carry out the rules 
of health laid down for his guidance, to play the 
game fairly and squarely with unstacked cards, 
the chances are extremely favorable for coinplete 
recovery and restoration to useful productive ca- 
pacity. 

Dr. Bowers prescribes good food, proper 

clothing, sanitary homes, short hours, high 

wages, compensation for injured workmen, 

and the substitution of the "Golden Rule" 

for the "Rule of Gold." His prescription 

and that of the unions are identical. 



"Peace With Price." 

The National Labor Journal, published 
under the auspices of the District Assembly 
numbered 66, Order of Knights of Labor of 
America, is pronuilgating a scheme termed 
"Industrial Peace Proclamation." One page 
of the paper is devoted to a short heading, 
then the balance of the page is taken up 
with photograph signatures of members of 
Congress and others subscribing to its In- 
dustrial Peace proposition. It is luidcrstood 
that this publication is soliciting signatures 
and that in some instances at least, it is 
alleged, money is asked for the privilege of 
signing. It appears to be rather a singular 
situation, when men are asked to contribute 
for signing a document declaring for in- 
dustrial peace. 



vSix thousand drydock workers at CardiflF, 
Penarth, Barry and Newport, who have been 
idle since July 28, have returned to work. 
The signing of a two years' agreement with 
the rivet warmers, and a provisional settle- 
ment with the i)laters' helpers, ended the 
controversy. 



Tin-plate boys are on strike at Swansea, 
Wales, and girls at Ownifclin are also en- 
gaged in an industrial struggle. About 300 
boys and girls arc out and 3,000 men will 
have to sto|^ work unless an early settle- 
ment is reached. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Domestic and Naval. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



^MM^M^M^^«^^^MM^^^^^^^^^^^'V«^<^^N^^^^^S^^^^^^>^^^^^^S^^^^^^^^i^i^^^NM^«M^^V^^W^A^WN^N#WW« 



EUREKA, CAL. 



The bark John S. Emery was towed 
into San Juan, P. R., from Mayagucz 
by the revenue-cutter Algonquin on 
September 7, with rigging damaged. 
The schooner Stella R. Kaplan was 
recently reported sunk on Tail of 
Horseshoe Shoal, in Chesapeake Bay. 
The crew were landed at Norfolk. 

The steamer Burmudian arrived at 
New York on September 29 and 
brought the master and crew of the 
schooner Stephen G. Hoit, which 
foundered in a hurricane off the Vir- 
ginia coast during the previous week. 
The barges Liberty and Florida, in 
tow of the tug Teaser, went ashore 
on the upper end of Blackwell's Is- 
land on September 22 while proceed- 
ing through Hell Gate. They were 
floated later and taken to Astoria 
Cove. 

The steamship Joseph W. Fordney 
has been chartered for one or two 
trips by the Philadelphia and Gulf 
line to run between Philadelphia, 
Charleston and New Orleans, while 
the steamship Mae is being over- 
hauled. 

The new French liner Rochanibeau 
arrived at New York on September 
25 on her maiden voyage. The trip 
across was uneventful save for a col- 
lision with a whale when the ship was 
off the Grand Banks. The whale was 
cut in two. 

The Norwegian bark Record, Bahia 
Blanca for Matane, struck on the 
rocks at Main a Diu, near Scaterie, 
recently, during a thick fog and 
heavy sea. Eleven men were taken 
off by life-savers. The vessel may 
prove a total loss. 

Four bodies were found on Septem- 
ber 26 in the petty officers' room of 
the Maine. The recovery of the 
bodies, which remain unidentitied. 
was made possible by the building of 
a temporary bulkhead which cut off 
the inflow of mud and water from the 
after part of the wreck. 

Governor Dix of New York on 
September 30 granted a pardon to 
Peter C. Hains, Jr., formerly a cap- 
tain in the United States Coast .Ar- 
tillery, who was serving an indeter- 
minate sentence of fourteen years for 
killing William E. Annis at the Bay- 
side Yacht Club in August, 1908. 

The breaking down of the steam- 
ship Goyaz on her way from Brazil 
to New York has filled with joy the 
hearts of those to whom her cargo 
was consigned, for the delay in her 
arrival increased by 10 per cent the 
value of her freight — all crude rubber 
from Para. It was worth at the strut 
$180,000. and on her arrival $200,000. 
Ranking as one of the greatest war- 
ships ever constructed, the Argentine 
battleship Moreno was launched on 
September 23 from the yard of the 
New York Shipbuilding Company at 
Camden, N. J. The Moreno and 
her sister-ship Rivadavia, recently 
laimchcd at Quincy, Mass., will carry 
twelve 12-inch guns. They will have 
a speed of 22;.-4 knots and will cost 
$12,000,000 each. 

Mistaking a whistling buoy for the 
Cape .\nn whistle at Thatcher's 
Island, the five-mastrfd schooner 
Helen \\'. Martin, Philadelphia for 
Portsmouth, N. H., .'itruck on Whiskey 
Ledge, on the outside of Cape Ann 
on September 25, during a thick fog. 
The vessel is leaking badly and, be- 
cause of her position on the treach- 
erous rocks, it is feared that she is 
badly damaged. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

When in port come up and give us a trial. 
The newest 25-cent house in town. 
New building, new furniture. 
Special attention to mariners. 



FREE BATHS 



Special Weekly 
Rates 



J. H. KLINE, Prop. 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 
Mate's and Pilot's License of all 
grades. Ocean, coast and inland 
waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. E. SNELLENBERG, 

Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses. 333 Globe Bldg., F'irst 
Ave. and Madison St., Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS,. HATS AND SHOES 



At 



WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SE.ATTLE, WASH. 

Seattle, Waah., Letter Lut. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 



Andersen, K. E. 
Andersen, J. G. 

-1534 
Hertelsen, Alf. 
Boe, E. L. 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlson, C. E. 
Dahlgren. A. 
Uerdio, F. 
Dennett, J. 
Dell, Herman 
Elwood, J. 
Elli-son, Chas. 
EUifson. Otto 
Klsted, J. 
Eiikson, A. -1732 
Krikson, O. -G06 
Erikson, Fridbjof 
Krikson, Aug. 
lOuBene, J. 
Fager, J. 
Farnan, W. L. 
Fellix, P. 
Felix, L. 
F"eeley, T. 
FJel.»tad, K. M. 
Franzell, A. 
flarbers, G. 
Hansen. C. J. -967 
Hansen, C. -1476 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Haak, C. 
Ilaga, A. A. 
Hansen, Harald 
Herman, Axel 
Henrikson, H. -1773 
Holmstrom, C. A. 
Holm, H. P. 
Ivcrson. Iver 
Ingebretsen, Olaf 
Jacklin. C. 



Jacobson, John 
Jensen, H. -1141 
Jensen, John 
Jensen, H. -2014 
Johansen, Ludvig 
Johanson, Olaf K. 
Johanson, Aug. W. 

-313 
Johanson, O. W. 

-139 
Johnson, John N. 
Johnson, Alf. -1700 
Johnson, Alex. 
Kalning, Jacob 
Karell, J. H. 
Kenny, J. 
Kittelson. C. T. 
Kiesow, P. 
Kirst, H. 
Knappe, Adolf 
Koptze, C. 
Kerwin. W. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kreutz, Karl 
Kroon, Z. 
Larsen, Alfred 
Lathi, J. H. 
Larsen, C. H. 
Lorin, K. 
Lundquist. John 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, O. P. 
Olsen, Bvor 
Olsen, J. H. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olssen, Frank 
Olsen, Erik 
Ommundsen. T. 
Osterberg, Gust. 
Paul, P. G. 
Peterson, Axel -1223 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
^,f vrt- -^ tlce and Theory of 

%k, » Navigation In all Us 

Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navl- 
gratlon In a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master. Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor In Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave. SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 6«4 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

Brewed by 
HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 

My Work Is My Best Advertisement 

W. H. MIDDLETON 

TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, Cutter 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In Every 

Garment 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three doors south of James, SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Halvor Eugene Krogstad, a native 
of Christiania, Norway, is iiujuired for 
by S. Krogstad, 853 Savier St., Port- 
land, Or. 



Peterson, C. V. -644 Schafer, P. 

Petterson, O. -710 Satto, S. 

Peterson. E. -668 Stor, W. T. 

Reime, T. Suomlnen, Alex. 

Keinink, H. Swenson, L. G. 

Reinhold, A. Swanson, Gus 

Kuunak, H. Stor. W. 

Scetveit, J. Thocke, E . 

Saar, J. 'i'ollefsen, Andrew 

Saniuelsen, A. R. Tergersen, Kasper 

-732 Turner, T. 

Scott. Alf. Wilde, H. 

Scarabosio, M. Zechel, W. 

Schultz, Wm. Zwahlen, R. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY H YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, SarsapariUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD. Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODQINQ 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLCF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "LIttIs 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street - - Eureka, Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Bror Utter, a native of Bornhus, 
Gefle, Sweden, last heard from in 
New York, in 1905, is inquired for by 
iiis parents. Address, Maskinisten 
Liter, Bornhus, Sweden. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: 

Gust Leyrle, arrived at Philadelphia, 
October 2, 1908, on ship Dirigo. 

Gustav Mattson and Victor Wilson, 
on schooner Charles Davenport. 
March, 1911. 

John McCauley, whose brother 
Cyrus McCauley (late of barge Har- 
risburgh) died in Marine Hospital, 
Philadelphia, on May 17, 1911. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN. WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 
Groceries and Notions 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS. 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen 

Trade with JUKKA SAHLSTEIN. 

New store. Everything is new and sold 
at right prices. 304 South F St., near 
Sailors' Union Hall^ Aberdeen^^ash. 

Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 

RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 

GO TO THE 



Union Cigar Store 

For Your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEGE- 
TABLES. Shipping supplied at lowest 
rates. Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash 



Waterman ® Katz 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Complete stock of Ship Candlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, Etc., Etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



Issued Dy AuUiorit/of uie Cigar Makers' InternatJonal Unlonof America 

Union-made Cigars. 

<Shi$ Sntifif^S. 'IW Uk ««« cooumed inUili Sox Mn bwi mM byt flCt-CbSS itAm 
attStCRor THr CiOAA uaieri 'iktunatioiui. uiiI0N(< Anviu. in atuiaUd devotei) tstfw ad. 

wiinnemofilieMORAiMAitRiAijndiKmiinUAIWlirARtOfmCRArT. "■ ' 




t^ese Ct^ifs to iH imoktn. Uiroia/tout th« motU 

•w ti« puintbtd jccortfingtolM: 



Thcr«1or9 wo reconaeid 



All WnnguMO uwo tins LlM 



^ }1C (/li4Cu^. ntadent, 
' cttruti 



tfAmmta 



VOLUME XXIIl 

OF THE 

COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Bound in Cloth and Thoroughly Indexed 

FOR SALE TO MARITIME UNIONS AT 
$2.00 PER VOLUME (Expressage Extra) 



Also a limited number of Volumes XVII to XXII. 
Address : Business Manager, 44-46 East Street, San Francisco, 
California. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H.T^MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats. Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 
Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall 2320 N. 30th Street, Old Town 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WorKingmen's Store 

Importer and Dealer In 
Fine Custom and Ready- Made Clothing 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Clothing, 
Trunks, Valises, Etc. 

ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

23 N. Third Street Near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE- 



Wanted 

By the United States Bureau of Labor, 
Washington, D. C, the following num- 
bers of the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 
Volumes 1 to 4 
Volume 5, Nos. 2, 20, 22, 27, 30 
Volume 6, Nos. 14, 17, 20, 31, 
45, 46, 48 

Anyone having any of the numbers 
indicated above will please communi- 
cate with the United States Bureau of 
Labor, Washington, D. C. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Rasmus Christian Sorensen, born 
July 13, 1876, on Birkum Mark, 
Fyen, Denmark- It is claimed that 
Mr. Sorensen may have been drowned 
on this coast about three years ago. 

MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 



Seattle, Wash. 



Areas, Chas. 
Barbo, M. 
Harnett, H. 
Bergstrom, F. 
Bradley, A. J. 
Bushby, Mr. 
Bonnell, H. 
Brown. F. C- 
Brownlee, Tom 
Connolly, Tom 
Chivers, L- 
Bngstrom, Swan 
Flores, Augstlne 
Grace. Richard 
Giradelli, A. 
Hanlon, Jack 
Hedger, A. 
Laugan, Jas. 
Law, Willie 
I^awson, John 
Lissen, Dick 
Mjls««, Henry 



Morris, Ernest 
Morgan, H. E. 
Morgan, L.. 
Morris, John 
Moyes, Andrew 
Murphy, E. M. 
McCall. Wm. 
O'Farrell, Jas. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Parrott, I- 
Pierce, Claude 
Stacey, Frank 
Stollery, Joe 
Stevens. Jas. 
Stevenson, J. 
Tlllbury, H. 
Tinoco, Joe 
Taylor, W. 
Vanhear, Jas. 
Van Ermen, H. 
Welsh, J- G. 
Watta, Chaa. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal 




Own the 
Time Clock 

Don't Ring It 

Why not own the time clock instead 
of "ringing up" all your life? There 
is no reason why you can't do it if you 
have enough ambition. 

This first step is training — that leads 
to promotion and more and more 
money. Once a man acquires training 
and begins to go up, there is no such 
thing as calculating where he will stop. 

There are many students of the Inter- 
national Correspondence Schools who 
are now owners and directors of great 
enterprises, who were merely laborers 
before they received the help of the I. C. S. 

You begin by deciding upon the char- 
acter of the work most congenial to you. 
You simply indicate your choice l;y mark- 
ing the coupon as directed, and sending 
it to the International Correspondence 
Schools. 

I. C. S. instruction is destined to put 
money in a man's pocket right away — 
not years hence. 

Remember, you don't have to leave 
home, lose time, nor tie yourself up 
with any embarrassing obligations. 

Mark and Mail the Coupoo TODAY. 



International Correspondence Schools 

Box 898, Scranton, Pa. 



rkcil X. 



to tlic l,( 



M.TSter 
First Officer 
Second Odiccr 
Petty Officer 
Chief EnEineer 
First Ass't Eng. 
I.alie Cajitnin 
Second-Class Pilot 
Marine Ennincer 
Mechanical Drafts. 
English Branches 
Civil Ser. Exams. 



Commercial Law 
Advertisintr Man 
Hookkccper 
Slenot'tapher 
Electrical Engln 
Mechanical Eng. 
Civil Engineer 
Architect 
French 
Gcrni.tn 
Spanish 
Italian 



With 

Ed ISO 

Phonogr, 



Xante 

St. & No.. 
City 



.State^ 




.\ hurricane and cloudljurst devas- 
tated a number of Vesuvian villages 
on September 22. Sixty persons were 
killed. 

Dmitry Bogroff, the assassin of 
Russian Premier Stolypin, was tried 
by courtmartial at Kiev on Septem- 
l)er 22 and sentenced to death by 
Iiangiiig. 

'riie chief of the Turcomans has 
telegraphed to Teheran from Gunsah 
Tepeh that he has captured Moham- 
med AH and asks for instructions as 
to Ills disposal. 

Sir Robert Hart, Director-General 
of Customs in China from 1901 to 
1908 and Inspector-General since 1863, 
died at London on September 20, 
a,u:ed 64 years. 

A news dispatch from Vienna 
says Turkey proposes to present an 
ulliniatnni to Greece demanding that 
I he hitler witlidraw all claims to 
Crete. 

TIic latest official estimate places 
the number of victims of the de- 
struction of the l''reneli warship 
Liberie at 235 dead and 160 wounded, 
forty dangerously. 

The National Printing Works at 
Kio Janeiro were destroyed by fire 
"11 September 18. Oilier valuable 
l>ri)perty was burned and the damage 
is estimated at $5,000,000. 

I'ire broke out in the ammunition 
jiold of the French battleship Liberie 
at Marseilles on September 25, and 
the vessel sank nineteen minutes 
later. Nearly 250 of the crew are 
dead. 

Traceable to the high prices of the 
necessities of life, riots broke out at 
Vienna on September 17 and many 
persons were killed or wounded. 
Troops fired on the mob wliich had 
erected barricades in the streets. 

Hecausc of the recent drought and 
high cost of living the Prussian Min- 
ister has decided to cut in half the 
railroad freight rates on potatoes, 
fresh vegetables, corn and fodder 
grain, and to reduce the rate on sea 
fish. 

Tiie Jean Bart, the new French 
warship of the "super-dreadnought" 
class, was launched at Brest on Sep- 
tember 22. She has a displacement 
of 23,467 tons and, with engines of 
28,000 horse-power, is e.xpccted to 
show a speed of twenty knots an 
lionr. 

.•\ serious engagement between 
Chinese Government troops and the 
insurgents occurred on September 23 
at Shwang Liu, ten miles south of 
Chang Tu, in which the former had 
the advantage. The troops lost hea\i- 
ly, but the insurgent losses were still 
greater. The insurgents hold Mcl- 
ehow, fifty miles south of Chang Tu. 

The interview that the French Km- 
h;issador to Germany. M. Canibon, 
had with the German Minister of For- 
eign Affairs, Herr Von Kiderlen- 
VVaechter, on September 20, con- 
lirmed the French impression of tiie 
conciliatory disposition of the Ger- 
man Government and heightened the 
prospects of an early arrangement re- 
garding Morocco. 

The population of ("hin;i, as esti- 
ni.-ited by the Imi)eri;il Customs in 
the alistract of statistics for 1910, is 
placed at about 1,000.000 less than 
the estimated population in 1909, bul 
tlie figures are about the same as 
those for five years ago. The total 
IJopulation in 1906 was placed at 438,- 
214,000, while the population of the 
open ports was estimated at 6,917,000. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The report of u proposed dissolu- 
tion of the Steel Trust has been of- 
ficially denied. 

A shaft 170 feet deep on the Shake- 
speare placer gold mine, on Dome 
Creek, Alaska, caved in on Septem- 
ber 27, imprisoning fourteen miners, 
mostly Russians. 

It is announced officially that M. 
George Bakhmetieff has been ap- 
pointed Russian Embassador at Wash- 
ington. He will arrive at Washing- 
ton about November 1. 

William A. Lewis, a bodyguard of 
.\braham Lincoln during the Civil 
War and a policeman at the White 
House for thirty-five years, died on 
September 28, aged 85 years. 

With the death of Chief Satago at 
St. Ignace, Mich., on September 27, 
there passed away the last great 
sachem of the once powerful Chip- 
pewa nation. He was 108 years old. 
.'\cting without reference to the re- 
fineries at New York or San Fran- 
cisco, Tacoma (Wash.) jobbers on 
September 30 reduced the price on all 
grades of sugar 70 cents a hundred 
Ijounds. 

The towns of .Austin and Costello, 
Pa., were completely destroyed on 
September 30 by the bursting of a 
dam, followed by fire. The loss of life 
is estimated at 300 out of a population 
of 3000. 

The long-threatened strike of 35,000 
shopmen on the Harrinian lines, in- 
cluding the Illinois Central Railroad, 
began on September 30. Five unions 
are involved in the demand for recog- 
nition of the Federation of Shop Em- 
ployes. 

A warrant for the arrest of T. F. 
McClure, president of the Metropol- 
itan Bank and Trust Company, of 
Cincinnati, was sworn out on Septem- 
ber 30 charging him with receiving 
money from a depositor after the 
bank was insolvent. 

Ten thousand heads of New York 
families, 500 retail dealers and several 
hundred farmers of the Pennsylvania 
State Grange have combined in ;in 
association at New York to eliminate 
the middleman and to lower the high 
cost of living. 

According to figures compiled by 
the United States Geological Survey, 
the production of gold in California 
during 1910 was valued at $19,715,440. 
This is a small decrease in the pro- 
duction over 1909, when gold to the 
amount of $20,237,870 was produced 
in the State. 

James Rolph, Jr., was elected Mayor 
of San Francisco, on September 26 
by a vote of 47,417 over P. H. Mc 
Carthy, the incumbent, who receivc( 
a vote of 27,048. Rolph's majority of 
the entire vote was 8,126. The So 
cialist candidates polled a total of 
4,068 in a total vote of 78,583. 

At meetings held in London on Sep 
tember 30 by the stockholders of the 
.•\nglo-American Cable Company and 
the Direct United States Cable Com- 
pany the agreement to lease their 
lines to the Western Union Telegraph 
Company for a period of ninety-nine 
years was unanimously approved. 

The Kokumin. a Japanese news- 
paper published at Tojiio, announces 
that the United States has obtained 
a secret treaty and perpetual lease on 
50.0(X1 acres of land near Harbin, 
Manchuria. The dispatch says that 
the land i.s to be improved by the 
International Harvester Company, 
and that China will provide military 
guards and defray the cost of im- 
porting expert labor. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailor*' 
Union Ottiee are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Ottlce at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scliarrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Peder 

Nils 

Andrew 



Aass, Oscar 
Adolt'son, G. 
,\Ka. Johan 
Ahlbrecht, Emil 
Ahloff, W. 
Ahvens, W. 
Albertson, Chris 
Albrecht, Chas. M. 
Alund, Ture 
Amundsen, Albert 
Andersen, Aksel 
Andersen, 
Andersen, 
Andersen, 
Anderson, Nels 
Anderson, Anders 
Anderson, George 
Anderson, E. B. 
Baardsen, S. 
naardsen, T. 
Racklund, John 
P.Miird.si-n, Georye 
H.ick, E. E. 
Baisieux, M. 
Balda, Alfonse 
Barwa. D. 
Barney. Chas. 
Hau. Martin 
Bauke, H. 
B.Tiicr, Fri-d. 
Baunian, Chas. 
Bausback, B. 
Beach. Fred S. 
Beausang, E. 
B«ck, Edward 
Beikwith. Geo. 
Brckwith, Waller 
Belinv. Oscar 
Belin, Erik 
Bentin. Billy 
Benson, Fred. 
Benson, J. 
Bentzen, Bent 
Berg. H. J. 
Bt ig<|iiist, C. 
Berlin, Adolph 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Berlin, Werner 
Caen, P. 
Cafterty. John 
Campbell, Martin 
Chamberlain, L. C. 
(Prison, Axel Geo. 
Carlson, G. 
Carlson, Chas. 
t^arlson, F. 
Carlson, Mr. 
Carlson, T. 
Carls trom, A. 
Caspersen, Chris 
Causen, Jorgen 
Ceelan, John 
Christiansen, Fred. 
Dahler, Peter 
Day. H. E. 
I leans. Taft 
Deegan, John 
Doville, John 
Miller, Edw. 
rioerise, -306 
Dories, H. 

Rdulf, Mr. 
Edwards, S. 
Egeland. O. O. 
Kkendahl, Waino 
Ekstedt, Harry 
Kkstrom, Geo. 
Rkwall. Gust. A. 
Elfstrom, A. 
Kllingsen, F. 
Eliasen. Chas. 
Ellis, W. W. 
Ellison, Chas. 
Engdahl, F. 

Fasig, Don 
Feigen, Johan 
Fillix, Hans 
Finck, .lohn 
FingiTling. Ed. 
Fischer, Wilhelm 
Fjelman, Jonas 
Folvik, L,. C. 

Gabrielsen, EUlng 
Garvin, F. 
Georgensen, A. 
(Jerdes, August 
Glbbs, H. D. 
Giesen, Billy 
Cilliolm. Albin 
Gilje, S. 
Gilling, John 
Gjardahl. Soren 
Glase, Gust 
Glfncross, Henry 
Gonda. Cornelius 
Grabovac. A. 
Graham. L. M. 
Grantley, C. W. K. 

Haak, R. 
Haas. Oscar 
Haagensen, M. 
Habedank, F. 
Habsbon. Jas. 
Hafke, Peter 
Haggar, F. W. 
Hagen, Louis 
Ilagglund, Chas. 
llaggbloin, Charlie 
llaic-r, Fred. 
Hakansson. Ing\'ar 
Hana, O. O. 
Hannus, Alex. 
Hansen, Emil 
Hansen, Herman L 
Hansen. -in69 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, Nllls 
Hansen, Die D. 
Hansen, Walter 
Hansen, E. A. 
Hansen, Carl -1910 
Hansen, Hans F. 
Hansen, Herman I... 
Hansen, Bernat 
Hanson. Thorn 
Hanson, H. C. 
Hansson, Chas. G. 
Hartung, Richard 
Haseth, August 



Anderson, August 
.■\nderson, Ole 
Anderson, John H., 

-1246 
Anderson. Victor 
Andersson. W. -1240 
Anderson, Axel B. 
Anderson. Martin 
Andersson, Karl A. 
Andresen, Anton 

-1635 
Apostolakos, Peter 
Armesen, Isok 
Arnold. Ernest 
Aronsen, Halfdan 
Asplund, Aug. 
Axelsen. Axel 
Azinl, Giuseppe 
Berlin, Nils 
Bernard, S. 
Bessesen. Olaf 
Billing, Knul 
Bird. Christopher 
Bjork, Algol 
Bjorklund. Erik 
Black, Victor 
Blasenham, Harold 
Bladen. Pete 
Blauert, Wm. 
Blomgren. M. 
Blumel, W. 
Boe. Carl R. 
Boers, M. 
Bohm, Emil 
Boldt. Chr. 
Bolt, Tony 
Boqvist, Charles 
Brannigan. Wm. 
Braun, Johan D. 
Bredesen, Johan 
Breekke, Hans 
Broders, Hajo 
Brose, Dick 
Brun, Axel -1S39 
Bryda, C. M. 
Burton, Chester 
Burmeister, John 

Christensen, August 
Christensen, H. P. 
Christensen, Olaf 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Christophersen, 12S8 
Clahsen, H. 
Classen, Henry 
Clausen, Jorgen 
Clyde, H. R. 
Corty, Caesar 
Crangle, Jas. 
Creijg, Enri(jues 
Cross, Leander D. 
Cunningham, An- 
drew 
Dosl. Theo. K. 
Douglas, Geo. 
Doyle, Wm. 
Drager, Otto 
Dreyer. H. 
Durholt. Hugo 
Duval, Bernard 
Duvel, Wilhelm 

Engstrom, M. R. 
Ennls. R. 
Eneson, E. K. 
Ericksen, L. H. 
Erdman, B. J. 
Ericksen, O. -60G 
Ericksen, Edw. 
Espersen, Anton 
Ericksen, Erick 
Erickson, Victor 
Erie, Andrew 
Espeland, August 

Forde. C. 

Forberg. .\lex. 
Foster, Mr. 
Frederikson 
Fredriksen. B. D. 
Furch, John 
Fuss, Henry 

Greenau. Charles 
Gronlund, Oscar 
Gronman, Karl 
Gronholm, W. 
Groth, John 
Guger, August 
Gulliksen, L,. Chr. 
Gundersen, Krlstian 
Gundersen. John 
Gundersen, Andreas. 

-78.'i 
Gusjaas. Oscar 
Gustafson, Ivar 
Gustafsen. Gust. 
Gutman. R. 
Guttenberg. Gus. 

Hazel. Wm. 
Heggstrom, H. 
Heggebo, I. 
Heinaz, C. 
Heinig, Johann 
Helcnius, Oskar 
Hellisto, Emil 
Helmros, G. 
Holmes, Gus 
Heltwood, A. S. 
Hengst, Otto 
Henriksen. Henrik 
Henriksson. -2028 
Hermansen, -1622 
Hermansen, Fritz 
Hesketh. H. B. 
Hesse, Emil A. 
Hetman. Walter 
Hofgaard, Hans 
Hogan, A. 
Hogan, Jim 
Holden, Olaf 
Holmes, Alex. 
Honor, Charles 
Hopstad, Sigurd 
Housler. Otto 
Hoye. Haakon 
Hubertz. Emil 
Huishneek, W. 
lUiltman, Albin 
Hunt, Thos. 



Irwin, Robert 
Haugen, Lars 
Haug, H. H. 
lllinan, Thorn. 
.larksun, John 
Jacobs, G. C. 
lamieson, J. E. 



Humphrey, W. P. 
Hutchison, Alex. 

Ingwardsen, I!. 
Juhansen. Niil.s 
Johanson, -1677 
Johansson, -1856 



Jaiisson, Frederick Johansson, Axel A., 



lensi-n, Hans -2014 
Jepson, Nels 
Jefferson, Victor 
Jelman, J. 
Jenkins, Fred. 
Jennett, Geo. E. 
lensen, P. 



■2050 
Johansson, John 
Johnson, G. Alb. 
Johnson, W. 
Johnsson, Herman 
Jordt, Peter -1737 
Jordfald. Th. 



.lensen. Hans -2062 Jorgensen, Johan 



Johnson, Julius 
Johnson, John 
.lohnson, J. M. 
Johansen, Chas. 
Kaasik, A. 
Kallas, Aug. 
Kallberg, Arvid 



Jorgensen, H. P. 

-i4ys 
Joseph, Ambrose 
Jouanne, Walter 
Kopperstad, O. 
Kopatz, Chas. 
Klhlman, Gunnar 



Karlberg, Karl Alf. Kilkeny, M. F. 



Karlsson, Oscar 

-13a9 
Karlsson, Karl J. 
Kelly. E. 
Kelly, T. F. 
Kenny, Jas. 
Keskula, John 
Kielman. Joe 
Kieson, Paul 
Kililman, Charles 
Kinsay, Wm. 
Klebingat, F 



KIrwan, Milton L. 
Kirkwood, Walter 
Kjarsgaard, Hans 
Knudsen. M. -375 
Krane, Anton 
Kraul. John 
Kralvik, O. 
Kramer. Fred 
Kreft, Paul 
Kristensen, Marius, 

-1088 
Krlstiansen, K. S. 



Klenmiensen, Eddy Kristarisen. -1355 



King. Harry 
Knudsen, Matthias 
Koch, Harry 
Kohne, Ernest 
Kulastaff. Julius 
Kolbe. Albin 
Konkila. Johan 
Laine, W. E. 
Larsen, H. C. M. 
l.iirsen, -1550 
l.arsen, Charles E. 
Larsen, F. A. 
Larsen. Ingvard 
r^arsen. Chr. S 
Larsen, John -1643 
Larsen, Herman 
Larsen, P. -1271 
Larssen, Soren M. 
Larson, Karl 
Larson, Max 
Latham, T. H. 
Lauritzen, O. 
Laurltsen. Hans 
Lai-sen. Klaus 
T^eiKhlhoflf. Chas. 
Lersten, J. O. 
l.owald, H. 
Madson. Thorolf 
Magnusson, Gust. 
M.ignusson, C. G., 

-691 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Magnusson, G. W. 

-1147 
Ma.iuri. -1912 
M.illenin. Chas. 
Marin, Joe 
Martin, Howard 
Martinusen. Olaf 
Martinsen, K. -1721 Miller, James 
Markmann. Heinrich Misterman, Paul 
Mathson, Mauritz Moe, John 
Matson, Johannes Mohr, Ernest 
Matt-son, William Moin, Robt. 
Mattsson, John Aug. MoUer. Hans 
Mattson, J. M. Mond. Mr. 

McCuU. James Montell, Chas. 

McDonald. John Moore, Wm. 



Krotchin. II. 
Kuhlman. Wm. 
Kuniel, K. 
Kumlander. E. 
Kupper, Alfred 
Kylander, Herman 

IjBwenson, John 
Llnd. Chas. 
Lind. W. 
Llnde, O. B. 
LIndholm, E. A. 
Lindroth, B. 
Ijindstrom, Alex. 
Lindgren. Chas. 
Lindeback. Linart 
Lltalien, Gust. 
Long, Robert 
Lorentzen, J. E. D. 
Loughlin. M. J. 
Lude. ThonvaUl 
Ludvigsen, A. -1249 
Luhrs, L. -1179 
Lund. P. 
Lundstrom, T. 
Lutter, Theodore 

McLaughlin, J. 
Mehrtens. Herman 
Meldell, John 
Melons. Alex. 
Mersman, L. 
Meskell, Mat. 
Meyer, Otto 
Meyer, Erwin 
Meyers, Hermann 
Meyer, F. C. 
Mikklesen. Alf. 
Miller. Walt. 



McKenzie, Jas. 
McKenzie, Duncan 
McKenna, Barny 
Nanberg, Gus 
Naujack, Gust. 
Nedberg. August 
Neeg, Theodor 
Nelsen, Ed. -1044 
Nelson. Carl W. 
Nelson, John 
Nelson. A. B. 
Ncssenberg, Fri. 
Nielsen, Wm. 
Nielsen, -1072 
Nielsen, S. -1030 
Oelmich, Harry 
O'Neill, Jas. 
O'Deen. Pete 
Olavsen, Christian 
Olmann. P. 
Olsen, E. 
Olsen, H. -478 
Olsen, H. -1159 
Olsen, John A. 
Olsen, -700 
Olsen, Billie 
Olsen. Chas. 
OLsen, O. 
Olsen, Olaf D. 
Pactlaw, JMw. H. 
Palmer, Joseph 
I'aludan, Chas. 
I'amisar, P. 
Paul, I'eter G. 
Pearson, N. F. 
Pearson, John S. 
I'earson, S. 
Pedersen, Laurlts 
Pekman, Ernest 
I'cndville, N. 
Persson, A. F. 
Perier, Jno. 
Perlsen, N. 
Petersen, Harry 
Petersen, Aage 
Petersen, Gert 
Petersen, H. A 
Petersen, Berthel 
Petersen, N. -1235 
Petersen, Oscar 
Petersen, C. L. 
Petersen, Meier 
Quarsell, Wm. 
Quinn, Wm. 
Ramberg, B. 
Rasmussen, -525 
Itjismusen, -497 
HasiiuKssen. Peter P.Roosa, J. 
Rasmussen, Emil Rost. Chas 
Hasnuissen, Oscar 
Rasmussen, S. V. 
-;t80 



Morse. Harry W. 
Muller, John 

Nilsen, Fred. -r.2ii 
Nilsen, Hendrik 
Nilsen, Ingvald 
Nilsen, Alfonse 
Nilson, N. 
Nllsson, C. M. 
Noack, Hans 
Nolan, John 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norris. Edward 
Norris, N. A. 

Olsen, O. S. -1123 
Olsen, O. E. -991 
Olsen, S. -1119 
Olson, BIrger 
Olson, G. B. 
Olson, G. F. -562 
Olson, Hans 
Olson, O. H. 
Olsson. Carl G. -1101 
Opperman, Wm. 
Ounliaum. N. 
Overock. Thos. 
Ozard, Wm. 

Pettersen, Frank 
Pettersen, S. A. 
Peterson, Joh:in 
Peterson, S. 
Peterson, A. 
Peterson, J. -1138 
Pi^terson, L. 
Peterson, S. H. 
Peterson, Victor 
Petterson, H. A. 
-1154 

Peterson, W^. A. 
Peterson, Otto 
Petterson, Victor 

-1447 
Phillips, Max 
Phillips, Geo. 
R. Pierce. Jno. 

Pietschman, Geo. 
Pletlte. Th. 
PimiUis, M. 
Pommer, John 
Prlede, Wm. 
Quigley, Robert 

Rlgnell. J. 
Roaldson, F. E. 
Roh.sham, W. 



Redmond, Mr. 
Reed. W. H. 
Reek, John A. 
Reuter, Ernest . 
Reutern. Axel 
Saar, P. A. 
Saar. Herman 
Saar, J. A. 
-Saalman. Joseph 
Sahlit. E. 



Ross, L. 
Rosenwold, I. 
Relnhold, Arvid 
Relnhold. Ernst 
Rosenthal, J. 
Rustamus, Julius 
Ryerson. Geo. 
Rytko. Otto 
Skogstrom, L. 
Smith. G. C. 
Smith, Johan 
Smith. Max 
Sommer, J. 



Sandstrom. Ivar 
.Sanders, Chas. 
Sander, Robert 
Sanderfeld, Fred 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Saul. Th. 
Scharr. Leonard 
Schroder, Paul 
Schevig. Anton B. 
Schluter, Paul 
Schmidt, Hans 
Scheol, Carl 
Schuster. Jacob 
Schultman, John 
Scott, Emil G. 
Selin, -1565 
Sexon, Chas. 
Simon, Paul 
Sjogren, John 
Sjolund, Henry. 
Sjostrom. Gus. 
Skoglund, Henry 
T<^ras, John 
Tervakalllo, G. A. 
Terras, M. 
Theorin. J. E. 
Thingberg. Oscar 
Thompsen. Peter 
Thompson. Ch. 
Thorsen, Arthur 
Thomas, Henry 
Ulappa, K. 
Ulbrand. Wm. 
I'lm. Gustave 
Valentine, Geo. 
Valens, John 
Van Foe 1 yen, P. 
Venema, Harry 
Vilpponen, Edv. 
Wagner, H. 
Walters, A. B. 
Walsh, R. J. 
Wanack, M. 
Waterloo, T. 
Waurisch, Richard 
Welin, Herman 
Welure, J. 
Wpsterman. Oscar 
Westman, A. 
We.sic, Gustav 
Wetzel, Carl 
Wiberg, John 
Young, Peter 
Zininierling, F. 
Zillig, Albert 



Sorensen. Tom -1492 
Sorensen. Carl 
Sorger, G. M. E. 
Sorensen. N. M. 
Soto, Santos 
Stangeland, P. 
Starr. T. 
Steen. Hilmar 
Slittenik, K. 
Stenlunil, John 
Sleiiberg, Erik 
Stimsen, Harold 
Sullivan, Jerry L. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Svane, A. 
Svanson, Chas. 
.Svanson. S. G. 
Svenson. Peder -2209 
Svendsen, Otto 
Svensson, L. G. 
Swanson, Ovel 

Tillman, Andrew 
Tompson, GunvaKI 
Tonnesen, Tryggve 
Topel, Fred. 
Torvig. Olaf 
Trentani. Louis 
Tscheekar, F. 
Tuveson, John 

Uppit, W. 
Ursin, Jno. 

Vlies, P. V. D. 
Vireck, A. H. F. 
Vis, Jacob 
Volghtlander, Felix 
Vucic, V. 
Wikstrom, Emil 
Wlllberg, Karl 
\\illman, -1020 
Wills, George 
Willartz, Fred 
Willert, Chas. 
Wilson, A. B. 
Wilhelnison, S. 
Wold, Olaf 
Wold. S. 
Wucst, Walter 
Wunstorf, Aug. 



Ziepke. Fritz 
Zoe, Frank 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' 
of the Paclflc. 



Union 



.\aga, Johan 
Baisieux, M. 
Balda, Alfonso 
Dyrness, L. E. 
Eliason, C. 
Espersen, Anton 
Fasig, Dan 
Gustafson, K. O. 
Hansen, Chris -96 
Hannus, Alex. 
Hartmere, C. 
Hogan, L. 
Johansen, John 



Johnson, John U. 

-2161 
Mcpherson, Peter 
Nilsen. Christ 
Sjoblom. Carl 
Stireii. Alfred -2443 
Seversen, Ch. 
Thoresen, Theodor 
Thilo, Peter 
WInblad, M. 
1245 Wilson, John C 
Wahl, Robert 



642 



Welure, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

.Vndcison, A. Lelitonen, John 

Almeida, J. C. Lindroth, -1189 

Aalto, Almo Lundberg, John 

Aken, Emil Lindroos, A. V. 

Aleksandersen. Halv-Lindroos, A. W. 
Andersen, -1119 Lorentzen, Ernst 

Andersen, Emil Lund, P. 

.\ndersen, Andrew Lundberg, C. 
Andersen, Olaf -lllSLandzard, John 
Anderson, Chas. Lindroth, -1189 

Anderson, Martin Morris, O. R. 
Anderson, SvendMehent, J. 

Hugo Manbohm, Hans 

Anderson, John Miller, F. W. 

Anderson, G. A. S. .Muller 
Anderson. FYank 



Ando, J. G. 
Bastian, Wm. 
Baxter, W. J. 
Benoit, Dewall 
Benson. Charles 
Bergland, A. 
Bianca, F. 
Bohm. August 



Muller, J. K. 
Maibohm, Hans 
Moris, Ocon R. 
Miller, F. W. 
Maibohm 
Muller. R. J. 
Mattison. J. M. 
Malmberg, Ells 
Mesketh, Robert 



Bodahl, Hans -1746 Molher, S. D. 



Samuelsson. Martin Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Sandberg, N. A. Soler, Emanuel 



Buye, Anton 
Brun, Mathias 
Benrowitz, Felix 
('arlson, Sven 
Clarke, Wallis 
Cjouda, C. 
Callow, A. W. 
Carlsen, -699 
Christensen, Hans 
Chresthensen 
Davis, J. 
Doyle, W. 
Ericksen, A. 
Erickson, A. 
Evensen, A. A. 
Evensen, Andrew 
Evensen, Louis 
Fardig, Wm. 
Gilbert, A 



Morse, H. W. 
Muller 
Moller, S. D. 
Nass, P. M. 
Nelson, Jack 
Olson, Waldemar 
Olsen. Olaf S. 
Opperman, Wm. 
O'Neill. Frank J. 
Harryouchterlong, Fritz 
Paul, Peter 
Pista, T. 
Pettersson, -1065 
Petersen, -1093 
Perdtes, John 
Penny, W. 
Pommer, John 
Petersen, Frank A. 
Price, Thurman 



Gunderson. Kristian Rasehtun, Franz 



Helander, E. J. 
Hansen, — 
Han.sen, J. T. 
Hansen, Jack 
Hanssen, Ernest 
Hanson. Henry 
llllig. Gust. 
Haraldson, -874 
Hernig, F. 
Heyke, F. 
Heyhe, A. 
Hvid. Hans 
Hohlstrom, A. 
Holm, Carl 
Hooley, Alex 
Hubner, H. 
lansson, Louis 



Rasmuss, Peter 
Reitter, F. 
Rasmussen, -485 
Kossbeck. Gust 
Rustanlus, John 
Sanselber, Paul 
Samuelsen. Ingwald 
Schelenz. Chas. 
Schnlder. Henrlch 
Scott. E. 
.Srhnider, H. 
Sansetter. Paul 
Sved.otrup. E. D. 
Smith, J. S. 
Svedstrup, E. F. 
Skattel. A. 
Seidel, Willy 



Jenson, John Frank SIndahl, Jens 



Johnsson, C. A, 

Johnsson. A. E. 

Janson, T.,ouis 

Johansson, -1874 

Johnson, Chaa. 

Johansen, Fritz 

Johanson. Carsten 

John, Robert 

Johnson, P. T. 

Julian. A. B. 

Karlsson, A. M. 

Kelish, George 

Kielman. Joe 

Kjarsgaard, Hans 

Klabee, Kawe 

Kolkln, F. 

Krauzer, Otto 

Lachman. Theodore Svendson. E 

Laine, A. V. Uggla. Fred 

Larson, Christ. 



Stange. Fritz 
Svenson, Bernard 
Summers, James 
Thomas, Henry 
Thomas, T. S. 
Vejoda, F. 
Weehauf, Henry 
Wiljanen. W. V. 
Wuest. Walter 

PACKAGES 
Beige, John 
Julius. P. 
I-ehtlnen. Kaarlo 
MacGoldrlck. Jas. 
Pedersen. Peder 
Pollson. Tom 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building; Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Markets Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (THE GERMAN BANK) CoRimerclal 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
of Sau Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $ 1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up In 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund 113,473.47 

Deposits June 30th. 1911 44,567,705.83 

Total Assets 47,173,498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post 
Office, or Express Co.'s. Money Orders, 
or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'cloclc P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; 
First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; Sec- 
ond Vice-President and Manager, George 
Tourny; Third Vice-President, J. W. Van 
Bergen; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secre- 
taries, G. J. O. Folte and Wm. D. New- 
house; Goodfellow, Eells & Orrick, Gen- 
eral Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, 
Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, J. W. Van 
Bergen. Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, F. 
Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH. 2572 Mission Street, 
between 21st and 22nd Streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 
Clement Stieet. between 5th and 6th Ave- 
nues. For receipt and payment of De- 
posits only. W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
12 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 
10 EAST STREET 



S. W. Corner Market 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Inion Label 
Goods 

This store is headquarters for Men's 

furnishing goods bearing the UNION 

LABEL. 

Shirts with the UNION LABEL. 

Collars with the UNION LABEL. 

Neckties with the UNION LABEL. 

Suspenders with the UNION LABEL. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 



400 large, light rooms, 
night up; $1.25 week; 
Baths, Reading Room. 



night. Best 
Investigate. 



Rates, 25c per 
$5.00 month. 
Office open all 



place near waterfront. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 

Near Third Street 

100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 

Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below 5th, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 19M; Home J-19ei 



„SONNER AV NORGE" 

,,Henrlk Ibsen" Loge No. 7 
San Francisco 
Moter hver Fredagaften Kl 8, 1 Vet- 
erans' Hall, 431 Duboce Ave. 

Medlemskontingent $1: per Maaned: 
Sykebidrag $10: per Uke. 



Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite 5th 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 



72 

1158 

605 

2640 

26 



MARKET 
MARKET 
KEARNY 
MISSION 
THIRD 



STREET 
STREET 
STREET 
STREET 
STREET 



ALL UNION HATS 

Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



.Alexander, G. L. 
Ht-nsen, S. 
Christensen, Ole 

Martin 
Christensen, Harvy 
Farrell, Henry D. 
Frick, John 
Grant, John 
Grosfetti. J. 
Hansen, Hans F. 

-1746 
Hansen. J. P. 
Ivars. Carl 
Jacobson, W. 
Johansen, Arthur 
Johnston, R. 
Kolkin, Fred 
Krohn, John 



I.angvid, Ernest 
Ijundquist, Alex. 
Menz, Paul E. 
Nelsen, Nels 
Olsen, C. 
Oterdahl, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
Pedersen, Peter 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Petteson, Oscar 
Plottner, W. 
Rasmusen, Karl 
Rowke, Fred. 
Schivig, B. 
Wachmann, Hans 
Wallen, L. 
Wilson, John 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



DIAMONDS - - WATCHES - - JEWELRY 

ON CREDIT 



763 

MARKET ST. 

Upstairs 




San 

Francisco, 

Cal. 



Send for Handsomely Illustrated Catalogue— FREE 



C. BREINING 



Special Marine District Representative 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



^^^^^^^V^^^^^^^^S^/^^^V^*WV^^>^Si»%«'WWSi'V>^^ 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLOTHIER AND FURNISHER 
FOP GENTLEMEN 

Up-to-Date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 
Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION (lADe 

RED:SESL cigar CO., MANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the address of 
Thos. Symington, age 59, last heard 
from in Seattle, Wash., 1908, will 
please communicate with John Sym- 
ington, 674 West Madison street, 
Chicago, 111. 

Information wanted of the where- 
abouts either of the parents or next of 
kin of Oscar Wilhelm Fredericksen. 
Fredericksen was born in Norway in 
1884; he was about five feet five inches 
tall; from light to medium build, blue 
eyes and blonde hair; had been on 
Pacific Coast of United States since 
1905; was a sailor. Write to F. R. 
Wall, Merchants' Exchange, San Fran- 
cisco, California, United States of 
America. Norwegian papers please 
copy. 

Peder Junget Madscn, born near 
Jelling, Denmark, in 1878. Mr. Mad- 
sen has in 1907-1908 been a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
His mother has not heard from him 
since the latter part of 1908. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List 



Anderson, Su. A. 
Anderson, V. 
Anderson, E. Alfred 
Barnard, C. 
Buckland, W. 
Buwmeister, I. 
C;arlsoti, M. 
Carl.son, Conrad -.'551 
Collins, E. F. 
(Conrad, Fritz 
Driscoll. I. 
iml.lin. Gustaf 
I'"ors, Alfred 
Goude, C. 
Grove, Albert 
Oustafson, .Tohan 
Gustaf son. Axel 
llan.son, H. I. 
Ilakonson, Ingvar 



Hegan, Patrick 
Holten, Pete 
Jacobson, Erland 
.lohanson, H. J. 
Karlson, N. 
Larson, IjOuIs 
Lovlk, Aron N. 
Lundbech, M. S. 
Marvin, Joseph D 
Mittemeyer, J. F. 
Nielsen, Wilhelm 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Nielsen, Chr. 
Nielsen, Nlel.s - 
Schelenz, Karl 
Smith, Max 
Sovlg, Martin 
Stensland, Piuil 
Weback, S. 



T.'il 




.\11 the employes of Metters, Ltd., 
stovemakers, Alexandria, New South 
Wales, numbering about 250 went on 
strike recently in protest against the 
"si)ceding up" system of piecework. 

J. J. McNamara was re-elected by 
acclamation Secretary of the Interna- 
tional .Association of Structural 
P.ridge and Iron Workers, in session 
at Milwaukee on September 25. A 
gold badge was voted to McNamara. 

According to press reports, the rail- 
way strike appears to be collapsing. 
.Ml the services are normal except on 
tile Great Southern, but there condi- 
tions are improving. After five days' 
suspension, traffic was reopened on 
the Kerry and Queenstown branches. 

.All repairers of cars and coaches 
employed in the Union Pacific shops 
were placed on full time on Septem- 
ber 25, after working for nearly a 
year on a schedule of five days of 
eight hours. The new schedule gives 
the men fourteen additional hours per 
week, or six days of nine hours. 

Three thousand members of the In- 
ternational Brotherhood of Mainte- 
nance of Way Employes, employed 
by the Delaware, Lackawanna & 
Western railroad are on strike. The 
men are demanding the reinstatement 
of a foreman, who, it is said was dis- 
charged on account of union activity. 

During 1910 there were in Bavaria. 
259 strikes and 76 lockouts. The num- 
1)er of workmen involved in the 
strikes was 17,755, and those con- 
cerned in lockouts numbered 19,712. 
In 66 strikes the worknicn were en- 
tirely and in 130 partly successful, 
while in 63 they were unsuccessful. 

The ballot taken by the Northuin- 
berland (Eng.) Miners' Council on 
the question of tendering notices that 
the miners will strike against the 
three-shift system, and will ask the 
Miners' Federation of Great Britain 
to agree to a national stoppage of 
work, has been carried by a large ma- 
jority. 

Columbia Typographical Union No. 
101, of Washington, D. C, appro- 
priated $400 for the defense of the 
McNamara Brothers. The appropria- 
tion was made in response to the 
recommendation of the International 
convention th.at an assessment of 
twenty-five cents be levied on every 
mcniliei- of the Union. 

I'or sixteen months members of the 
Metal Polishers, Buffers, Platers and 
Brass Workers' International Union 
have been at war with the Toledo 
Chandelier Company and the Western 
Gas Fixture Comjiany. The men have 
displayed great courage and perse- 
verance and their efforts have been 
rewarded by a settlement. 

In Germany members of the Metal 
Workers' Union have voted to go on 
strike because the employers have re- 
fused to agree on a wage scale. At 
La Basse-Indre in France the foundry 
workers are on strike. Railway em- 
|)loyes in Vienna are preparing for a 
general strike for higher wages. Dock- 
ers at Bilbao and Malaga are on 
strike. 

Uncle Sam probaijly employes more 
peoi)le than any other employer or 
State in the world. On his pay-roll 
at the present time arc 222,278 men 
and women protected by civil service 
regulations. Nuinber of exceptions, 
59,702. Number not under civil serv- 
ice 64,892, number appointed by the 
President 9,525; workers on the 
P.inania Canal, 28,191; total, 384,088. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




So Sweet of Her!— The Soubrette— 
And he saitl I was nothiii' but a 
trained cat. 

The Ingenue — What a shame! Von 
ain't a bit trained. 



Living by the Pen. — "I can't make 

my living by my pen." 

"I make a good living by my pen." 
"Do you, too, write poems?" 
"No; I raise pigs." — Baltimore 

American. 



Literature. — Willis — Do you tliink 
our young people are losing their 
taste for literature? 

Gillis — Gracious, no! You ought to 
see those kids of mine fight for the 
comic .supplement every Sunday. — 
Puck. 



Rude Man. — "Men are such rude 
things," said the supercilious girl. 

"Has any of them dared to address 
you without an introduction?" 

"No. But in a crowd one got his 
face all mixed up with my hat pin and 
never even said excuse me." — Wash- 
ington Star. 



Cured Himself. — "I have cured my- 
self by learning to chew my food." 
"What have you cured yourself of?" 
"The belief that if I remained away 
from the office for more than ten 
minutes at lunch time everything 
would go to the dickens." — Chicago 
Record-Herald. 



Omissions of History. — With ex- 
treme reluctance Hercules had put on 
women's garments and was spinning 
wool. 

"Look at me!" he exclaimed, bit- 
terly. "Ain't I a lovely thing to be 
courting a Queen of Lybia?" 

Worse than that, he suspected the 
wool of being three-fourths cotton. 



Little Left.— "What's the matter 
here?" asked the caller, noticing the 
barren appearance of the house. 
"Sent your goods away to be stored?" 

"No," replied the hostess. "Not at 
all. My daughter was married last 
week and she has merely taken away 
the things that she thought belonged 
to her." — Detroit Free Press. 



Joint Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings accOTint. 

They can not start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWOUTHY SCHOOL 

is under the direct and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 

with all modern appliances to illustrate and 

teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a knowl- 
edge of Navigation, and Navigation only. 
Conditions have changed, and the American 
seamen demand a man as a teacher with 
higher attainments than one who has only 
the limited ability of a seaman. The Prin- 
cipal of this School, keeping this always In 
view, studied several years the Maritime 
Law, and is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of Navigation and Its 
kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, for 
no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of common 
education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the depths of 
Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a comparatively 
short Interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 




Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nautical 
Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 




MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observation! 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY 

J. COHEN &. CO. 
Baltimore ClotHin^ Store 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 
have installed a Tailoring Department in their store and are now making 

Suits to Order 

Union Label, Union Tailors 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 



Eyes Examined F ree Repairing Our Specialty 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 

the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 




Jamt3 3t. Sorensen 

^98 anti Jt9a». 




United States Nautical College 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 
Member of California Teachers' Association. 

Candidates prepared in the shortest possible time for Masters, Mates, 
Pilots and Wireless Operators. . 
Government Examinations. 

The Hitchfield system is the easiest and most modern in all branches. 

Do yourself the justice to investigate. 

320 Market Street, San Francisco. Phone Kearny 4686 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Get a New Stove 
on Hale's Club Plan 

$2.00 Down 
$1.00, $1.50 or $2.00 

a Week, According to the Price 
of the Stove You Select 




This stove is a regular $27.00 
"Quick Meal" gas stove offered at 
$2 1 .00, with the privilege of club 
terms. 




_GOOD GOOPjS , 
Market and Sixth Sts. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 



719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 
C. BREINING 

Representing Marine District 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boots, Stioes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Aut- 
tlts a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Uo 
nut make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 




oBfiBusitn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE ^ 

JUiGOMUTsn 



m 










FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 




A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXV, No. 4. SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11.1911 


Whole No. 2141. 





TOW-BARGES AND LOG-RAFTS. 



How Barges Are Handled. 

Barges — a long string of barges ! Have 
you seen them towing along the Atlantic 
Coast? The seamen see them, and mutter: 
"Coffins — a long string of coffins !" No name 
given to anything on this earth was ever 
more truly descriptive. 

This mode of marine transportation was 
invented to save money for the man on 
shore and to kill the men whom God in his 
wrath permitted to be sent to sea; not only 
the men in the barges, mind you, but the 
others as well. The press will report that a 
string of barges has been lost, and that is all 
there is to the report. Let us try to under- 
stand what really happens in such cases. 

A towboat goes to sea with a string of 
barges ; the towboat has the usual crew ; a 
hawser is made fast to one barge, the next 
one is fastened to the first, and so on ; three, 
four, five, and sometimes six barges in the 
string. The barges have no rigging or sail 
that can be depended upon, and they have no 
crew to handle any sails even if the masts 
could carry any sails in a gale. 

Usually there are four men and a master 
on each barge. There is some steering done, 
especially on the last barge in the string. In 
fine weather this is all right for the barges; 
but when a steamer or sailing vessel comes 
along there is always trouble to get clear of 
this long string. One is rarely certain if 
they are one string or vessels sailing close 
to each other. In hazy or foggy weather 
there is great danger that a mistake may be 
made during the night. 

So, you sec, these modern vehicles of 
maritime commerce are a serious danger 
to other vessels, even when still in the 
string and supposedly under control. Grant- 
ing that those who are destitute enough to 
go in these barges as seamen deserve all 
they might get, even granting that their loss 
by drowning is so much "good riddance of 
bad rubbish," yet there are the passengers 
on that steamer. They have, even under 
our law, to be considered, because the laws, 
or the theorv thereof, so command. Thev 



pay for a passage and have not agreed to 
take any such chances. So much for the 
string. 

But there often comes a time when the 
string is a string no longer. A gale comes 
along; the string is too heavy for the boat 
and the barges tow the towboat toward the 
shore or the shoals. The master of the tow- 
boat must now decide whether he will go 
on the shore or the shoal with the string, 
or save his vessel, himself and his crew. 
Ready to Cut Away. 

At the towing-bitts are placed two broad- 
axes ; these axes are sharp and are there 
for one purpose only. When the barges are 
towing the towboat toward a dangerous 
spot, the string is cut loose, the towboat 
saves herself, the barges go on the shore or 
shoal, or if they escape and do not sink at 
once, then toward the open sea. In either 
case the men in them are drowned. If going 
toward the open sea they can not live long 
in the trough of the sea, so it does not mat- 
ter much where they go when cut loose. 
The result is the same. There is not a win- 
ter but several of these tows are lost with 
the men. The sum total of men lost in this 
way is difficult to estimate but it runs into 
the thousands. They are lost to save money 
for men on the "make," men who risk noth- 
ing, not even their standing in the com- 
munity. 

The money thus saved goes to the commu- 
nity in the shape of lower prices in some in- 
stances, in others it goes to swell dividends. 
The substance of the matter is that while it 
reduces the freight, say on coal, it reduces 
the value of vessels that are built for honest 
coal-carrying, and kills the men employed. 
Now, seriously, is twenty-five or fifty cents 
on a ton of coal so important that to get it 
the value of investments in bona-fide ship- 
ping shall continue to be depressed and 
human lives sacrificed? 

If this question could be sulimitted to 
those who pay for and use the coal there is 
no sane man doubts the answer. The in- 
struction would be quick and emphatic: 



Abolish this horror. Stop this sacrifice of 
human life. Give the seamen and the decent 
shipowner a ciiance. This has lasted too 
long now. 

There is a law which is supposed to regu- 
late this traffic ; but any regulation which 
permits more than one barge to be towed is 
murder under the supervision and indorse- 
ment of the Government. A towboat that 
loses one barge may succeed in picking her 
up again ; more than one, never. Not more 
than one barge should ever be towed at sea, 
unless they have motive power and crews 
sufficient to take care of themselves when 
cut loose. 

Log-Rafts on the Pacific. 

What the barges are to the Atlantic the 
log rafts are to the Pacific, with this excep- 
tion that the log rafts are still more dan- 
gerous. Of course the rafts have no men on 
them ; they are made fast to the towboat 
and are supposed to steer themselves. This 
they do in their own fashion; they go just 
where they like and no towboat can keep 
them under control. Sea and current do 
with these monsters just about what they 
will. 

Sometimes they break loose, and then 
they may be found, or not, as the case may 
be. Both have happened. Some have been 
recovered and some have been lost. When 
lost, they constitute the most dangerous of 
derelicts. Any vessel that happens to strike 
tliem while intact goes to the bottom as a 
matter of course. But this is not the worst 
that can happen. When they break up, the 
logs are floating about indefinitely or until 
driven on the British Columbia or Alaska 
shore by the current. In the meantime they 
are in the way of vessels. 

There are vessels on this Coast running 
more than twenty miles an hour. These 
vessels carry passengers, and they often 
have one thousand lives on board. Let one 
of these passenger vessels strike one of these 
logs end on and the log will break the plate, 
if it does not go right through. There may, 
of course, be other vessels so near that the 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BUY UNION LABEL BREAD. 



Boycott all trust-made non-union bread, 
thereby helping the organized bakery 
workers, and yourselves and your children, 
whose future you can protect if you will 
only act as we have shown you. As a mat- 
ter of fact, we might state here that the 
Bread Trust is employing children at the 
present time. While this Trust is very care- 
ful in keeping out of its plants anybody 
connected with a union, reliable informa- 
tion is in our possession that in its Cleve- 
land and Pittsburgh plants the Bread Trust 
is employing mostly children. Only a few 
practical bakery workers are employed and 
the rest of the shifts are made up of chil- 
dren. We wonder if for them the Bread 
Trust has "Made Happy Childhood." In- 
stead of the glaring posters showing a hap- 
py child holding one of the Trust's scab 
loaves in its hand, they might show a more 
effective advertisement while at work in 
these Trust plants. Where the union of the 
bakery workers attempts to regulate work- 
ing conditions in such shops in order to 
make the employment of children impossi- 
ble, and desires that employment for many 
bakers who are now out of work might be 
secured, the Trust promptly declares that it 
will have nothing to do with the union. 

The Bread Trust — and it matters not un- 
der which name it may go in the various 
parts of the country — is just now of no ben- 
efit to anybody, excepting to the stock- 
holders who have invested their money in 
these trust plants for the purpose of receiv- 
ing unearned dividends. The trust, as it is 
composed and run at the present time, is a 
detriment to the organized bakery workers, 
to you and to everybody else — excepting, of 
course, the trust magnates. The main in- 
tention of the Bread Trust at the present 
time is to reduce the cost of production by 
reducing our wages, thus making our chil- 
dren's childhood "happy." You will not 
gain anything if the trust is successful in 
reducing the wages of our men. You will 
not gain anything if the Bread Trust, after 
smashing the greater part of its competitors, 
will be able to buy its raw material any 
cheaper. You will not benefit or profit any- 
thing whatsoever out of the gains of the 
Bread Trust. This Trust, if it does not 
materially increase the prices of its goods, 
will not reduce them by any means. The 
Steel Trust, which is backing the Bread 
Trust with its millions, has proved this. 
After the steel industry was monopolized — 
and nobody will deny to-day that it has 
been monopolized — the Steel Trust did not 
reduce the price of steel. Just the contrary 
has been done. The price of steel has been 
greatly increased, and if you need steel you 
have to buy it from the Trust, and at the 
price this monster compels you to pay. The 
same thing will happen when the Bread 
Trust has got control of the bread market. 
The Steel Trust has reduced the wages of 
its poor laborers to a great and shameful 
extent. The Bread Trust intends to do the 
same. 

Do not help the Trust to accomplish this ! 
Foil its plans and. force it to give decent 
conditions and recognition to the organized 
bakery workers, by always demanding 
bread with the union label ! 



NAVIGATION OF SUEZ CANAL. 



The University of Paris has received en- 
dowments totaling $240,000 with which to 
promote aviation. 



The total number of passengers carried 
through the Suez Canal in 1910 reached 
233,978, as compared with 213,121 in 1909. 
Of the number carried last year, those clas- 
sified as military totaled 76,854, while the 
civilians numbered 128,171, and the pil- 
grims, emigrants, and convicts 28,953. The 
following table shows the volume of ship- 
ping through the canal by flag, number of 
vessels, and net tonnage, including merchant 
vessels, mail steamers, war ships, etc. : 



Flag. 



TTnited Kingdom.. 

Germany 

Netherlands 

France 

Austria-Hungary . 

Italy 

Japan 

Russia 

United States 

All other countries. 



1909 



Ves- 
sels. 



Net 
tonnage. 



1910 



2.561 

600 

251 

231 

148 

90 

76 

74 

t 30 

178 



9,592.387 
2.381.681 
800,950 
802,100 
519,772 
207.958 
357,613 
221,748 
105,793 
417,525 



-I- 



Ves- 
sels. 



Net 
tonnage. 



2,778 
635 
259 
240 
191 
87 
72 
103 
• 8 
160 



-I- 



-I- 



10,423.610 
2,563.749 
854. 5G1 
833,099 
642,826 
218,322 
350.937 
288,165 
8,996 
697,633 



Total 14,239 115,407,527 4,533 116.581.898 

t Including 27 war ships, tonnage 103,324. 
• Including 4 war ships, tonnage 6,851. 

Of the total tonnage for 1910, that of 
merchant vessels totaled 11,816,945 tons, 
mail steamers 3,990,817 tons, war ships 112,- 
846 tons, Goverment-chartered vessels 158,- 
097, and vessels in ballast 503,193 tons. 



VANISHING SAILING SHIP. 



The fact is that the advantages are by no 
means all on the side of the steamship. 
Though the sailing ship takes a longer time 
on the voyage, the expenses are correspon- 
dingly small. The motive power costs 
nothing, and the absence of engine space 
and bunkers makes it possible for the sail- 
ing ship to utilize almost the whole of her 
capacity as cargo space. In the ordinary 
tramp steamer at the present day, one-third 
or more of the gross tonnage has to be de- 
ducted before the net tonnage is ascer- 
tained. Moreover, the crew required for a 
sailing vessel is in general, proportionately 
to the size, much smaller than on a steam- 
er, because no engine staff is needed. On 
the other hand, of course, more men will be 
needed to trim the sails. But there is a 
further reason. The construction of sailing 
ships has not by any means remained where 
it was a century ago. Even then great ad- 
vances had been made by American build- 
ers through the invention of the clipper- 
built vessels. The clipper was long and 
narrow and was the fastest sailing vessel 
afloat. Considerably later than 1812 the 
clipper could, under favorable conditions, 
beat the steamship in the voyage across the 
Atlantic. Another type of sailing ship was 
the schooner, the main peculiarity of which 
lies in the arrangement of the sails. There 
are no yards or spars, and the sails swing 
upon the mast and are supported by booms, 
as in a small sailing boat. There is also a 
topsail, but this, as well as the other sails, 
can be hoisted from the deck, enabling 
great economy of labor to be made. This 
type of ship has been much developed by 
multiplying the masts, and in 1902 a ves- 
sel, the Thomas W. Lawson, was construc- 
ted with seven masts, built of steel, carry- 
ing 7500 tons of cargo, and requiring a crew 
of only nineteen men. In regard to the use 
of iron and steel, sailing ships have had the 
same advantages as steamers, though sail- 
ing-ship builders were perhaps not so much 
alive to the possibilities of these materials 



as steamship builders. The most important 
single cause of the disappearance of the 
sailing ship is its irregularity, which fits in 
ill with the prevailing desire for co-ordina- 
tion in the conduct of business. Conse- 
quently, the sailing vessel has been driven 
from one ocean highway after another. At 
the present time there are only a few 
routes, which, in consequence of the small 
importance of speedy delivery or of the 
greater reliability of the trade winds, still 
enable the sailing ship to gain a precarious 
livelihood. The most important of these 
are the ones which lead around Cape Horn 
to Chile, to California and to Australia, and 
round the Cape of Good Hope to India and 
Australia. — London Economist. 



BUILDING BIG SHIPS. 



Following the announcement that the 
Hamburg-American line is planning a ship 
bigger than the new Olympic conies the 
statement, not yet authoritatively con- 
firmed, that the Cunard company will so 
increase the size of the new Aquitania as to 
make her over 900 feet long, ten feet longer 
than the Hamburg-American craft, and 
more than fifty feet longer than the Olym- 
pic. Published contemporaneously with this 
latter report is an interview with Lord Pir- 
rie, head of the Belfast firm of Harlan & 
Wolff, builders of the Olympic, Titanic and 
several of the larger ships now sailing to 
and from this port under the German flag, 
l-vord Pirrie says that no mechanical diffi- 
culty is involved in building a ship larger 
than the new White Star monsters, but he 
is inclined to doubt the truth of the stories 
regarding the Hamburg-American and the 
Cunard plans for the reason that the Olym- 
pic now taxes available dock accommoda- 
tions to the limit on both sides of the ocean, 
and also because, in his opinion, ships long- 
er and of greater draft could with diffi- 
culty, if at all, navigate New York harbor. 

When a man of Lord Pirrie's reputation 
talks on the possibilities of ship-building 
he is listened to with the utmost respect. 
At the same time the belief will persist that 
the rumors of still larger ships contem- 
plated by foreign builders are not without 
foundation. The White Star Company went 
right ahead and gave the contract for the 
Olympic and Titanic to Lord Pirrie's firm 
with the knowledge that no suitable dock 
was available for them in this port and 
without any positive assurance that the 
War Department would consent to the 
lengthening of the piers in the North River. 
The very big ship which excels all others 
in point of size has generally proved a prof- 
itable investment for her owners. She com- 
mands more free advertising than any other 
vehicle of transportation in the wide world. 
Her cabins are usually well filled even in 
the seasons of slack travel. It is just possi- 
ble that the Cunard and the Hamburg- 
American companies are going to emulate 
the White Star people and "take a chance" 
on getting longer piers for the Aquitania 
and the Imperator. As to the questions of 
draft and the capacity of channels, it would 
be interesting to hear from Army engineers 
and others more familiar than Lord Pirrie 
can possibly be with conditions in New 
York as to whether the Olympic represents 
the limit of construction under these con- 
ditions. — Brooklyn Eagle. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



McNAMARA DEFENSE FUND. 



ALL TRADE-UNIONS, INDIVIDUAL 
TRADE-UNIONISTS AND THE PUB- 
LIC AT LARGE ARE URGED BY THE 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE McNA- 
MARA DEFENSE FUND. CONTRIBU- 
TIONS MAY BE SENT TO THE OF- 
FICE OF THE COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL OR TO FRANK MORRISON, 
SECRETARY, AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR, 801-809 G ST., N. W., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



A Well Deserved Victory. 

In Los Angeles, the "Open Shop City," 
the abiding place of General Otis and the 
stronghold of the Merchants and Manufac- 
turers' Association, organized labor has 
scored a decided and well-deserved victory. 
Eight years ago the firm of Charles Levy 
and Sons, spurred by the Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Association, locked out its 
union tailors. During the eight years the 
union men have never ceased in their efiforts 
to unionize this shop, and they have had 
to fight General Otis and the Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Association every hour of 
the day, every day of the week, every week 
of the month, and every month of the year. 
They are the victors. General Otis and the 
Merchants and Manufacturers' Association 
have been routed, and this firm, one of the 
largest and most substantial business houses 
in the city, has deserted the camp of the 
enemy and signed an agreement with the 
Journeymen Tailors' Union. 

The business men of Los Angeles are 
awakening to a realization of the fact that 
it is bad business policy to associate with 
labor crushers, whose chief aim is to com- 
pel workmen to labor for starvation wages. 
Well paid workmen have money to spend 
and the merchants get it. Poorly paid 
workmen have little to spend; their employ- 
ers spend it, mostly outside of the city, and 
the merchants do not get it. The organized 
labor movement in Los Angeles is going 
up. The Merchants and Manufacturers' 
Association is going down. 



Say Gas Caused Explosion. 

General Harrison Gray Otis, the union 
hater, who has tried to fasten the crime of 
blowing up the Times Buildmg on organized 
labor will now have to strive to keep the 
crime from being fastened on himself. 
Relatives of some of the workmen who lost 
their lives in the explosion have awakened 
to the realization of the fact that the Gen- 
eral, and not the union, is responsible for 
the death of their loved ones. The follow- 
ing dispatch from Los Angeles appeared in 
the Washington Star : 

Suit for $50,000 damages has been brought 
against the Los Angeles Times by the widow and 
mother of A. Churchill Harvey Elder, who died 
as a result of the disaster at the plant of that 
newspaper, October 1, 1910. 

The suit was directed against Harrison Gray 
Otis, president and general manager of the 
Times; Harry Chandler, treasurer and assistant 
manager, and Harry E. Andrews, managing ed- 
itor. 

The plaintiffs allege that the explosion in the 
Times Building was caused by gas. They charge 
the defendants with having negligently permitted 
the establishment to become filled with gas and 
with having failed to provide proper means of es- 



cape from the building in accordance with city 
ordinances. 

Elder was assistant city editor of the Times. 
When the explosion occurred he jumped from 
the third story window and was so severely in- 
jured that he died. 



A Decided Victory. 

Standing shoulder to shoulder, with : 
"The concern of one the concern of all" 
as their motto, the garment-workers of 
New York have gained another substantial 
victory. In the past the struggles between 
the garment-workers and their employers 
have been long and bitterly contested. Now 
the garment-workes are united and the 
struggles are growing fewer and of much 
shorter duration. The strike recently ended, 
lasted less than a week and the strikers 
have practically gained every one of their 
chief demands. 

The demands of the union most strenu- 
ously opposed by the employers, and firmly 
demanded by the strikers, follow : The 
union shop; the abolition of piece work; a 
fifty-four hour week ; half holiday on Satur- 
day ; tailors to be paid not less than $24; 
male helpers, $18; female helpers, $16; a 
fixed pay day and payment to be made in 
cash ; no home work and no Sunday work ; 
no overtime after 8:30 p. m.; union is ac- 
corded privilege of having shop delegate 
and union delegate who are to have access to 
the shops at all times; equal division of 
work during the dull season, the establish- 
ment of a board of grievances ; a joint board 
of sanitary control and a permanent board 
of arbitration. 

An agreement covering all the above 
points has been entered into between the 
Merchants' Society of Ladies' Tailors and 
Dressmakers of New York and Local No. 
38 of the International Ladies' Garment 
Workers' Union. 

Some of the smaller employers are still 
holding out, but their shops are picketed 
and the determination of the workers to 
win is so evident that they are yielding one 
by one. The victory of the ladies and dress- 
makers will be complete in a few days. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Some Good Work 

Representatives of the New Hampshire 
State Federation of Labor have succeeded 
in securing some splendid laws from the 
General Court of 1911. Among them are 
laws providing for "first aid to the injured 
cabinets" in workshops and factories, the 
cash payment of wages, the re-creation of 
the bureau of labor, employers' liability and 
workmen's compensation, the regulation of 
child labor and preventing the defrauding 
of laborers. 



Another Blow at Courts. 

In an editorial note Pearson's Magazine 
for September has this to say of the courts: 

It may be put down as a fact that the majority 
of the people is not satisfied with the brand of 
justice that our courts are handing out. Tiie ma- 
jority understands only the results of decisions. 
And with tlie results much the greater part of 
the people are dissatisfied. They are particularly 
dissatisfied with those decisions which have an- 
nulled the people's will. That's just what the 
courts do. The people, by constitutional right, 
assemble and make the laws which they want. 
The courts, if they please, without constitutional 
right destroy those laws. The Constitution which 
the judges in their decision appear to hold sacred 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, U/j 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, III. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E.. 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemcene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Fcderazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Firt- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Mackay (Aus.) engine-drivers have 
come under the banner of the Aus- 
tralian Workers' Association. 

Twelve thousand dock laborers re- 
cently went on strike in St. Peters- 
burg, and the strike involved two- 
thirds of the shipping of the port. 

The Amalgamated Society of Engi- 
neers, in Melbourne, Aus., notified 
the ironmasters that they want Is. a 
day increase, and it was given them. 

Si.x hundred men employed at the 
Lithgow ironworks in New South 
Wales are now on strike in defense of 
a fellow-workman. 

A bill has been introduced in the 
British House of Commons making it 
illegal to assess fines against work- 
men in cotton factories. 

Before a Sydney (Aus.) wages 
board recently it was stated that the 
price of groceries had risen from 7j/. 
to 10 per cent during the last two 
years. 

The engineers' laborers of Man- 
chester (Eng.), numbering 3500 men. 
have struck for a minimum wage of 
£1 a week. The movement affects 
9000 workers. 

Because the employers refused a 
satisfactory revision of the wage 
schedule, 800 men and boys employed 
at the Waterloo Main Colliery, Leeds, 
have gone on strike. 

The British Government has de- 
cided to appoint a Board of Trade 
commission empowered to arbitrate 
labor disputes. The commission will 
consist of twelve commissioners, rep- 
resenting equally the employers and 
the employes. 

Speaking recently at a meeting of 
the Rural Workers' Union at Wagga 
(N. S. W.), Mr. McNamara, general 
secretary, said a strike in the midst 
of the harvest would do the rural in- 
dustry no good, but if it occurred the 
farmers would have only themselves 
to blame for ignoring the conciliatory 
tactics of the workers. 

Some time ago the members of the 
Goldfields Federated Miners' Union 
of Western Australia took a ballot on 
the question of the discontinuance of 
working with non-unionists. The 
actual result was that 1593 were for 
the discontinuance of the working by 
unionists with non-unionists, 243 were 
against it, and 29 votes were informal. 

Though the glass bevellers' strike 
in Australia is now in the eightli 
week there seems to be no signs of a 
settlement. So far about 20 of the 45 
men who originally went out on 
strike have been provided for, 14 hav- 
ing returned to work at the rate de- 
manded, namely, £3 per week, and 
the remainder having found work at 
the same rate in Sydney and .Adelaide. 

Witnesses called before the alleged 
"Shortage of Labor" Commission in 
Sydney. Aus., recently, gave evidence 
that girls working at onions in the 
pickle and sauce factories had their 
feet in a gutter of running water. The 
women became wet from waist to 
feet, and had to wear blucher boots. 
.An instance was quoted where a girl, 
23 years of age, earned only 4s. 6d. a 
week. 

The Melbourne (Aus.) district of 
the Amalgamated Society of Engi- 
neers has presented to all* the engi- 
neering firms of the city and to the 
Railway Commissioners, its demand 
for an increase of wages. The in- 
crease on the old rates is about Is. 
a day. The circular containing the 
demand sets out that the rates of pay 
asked for must be paid after .August 
5, 1911. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

SAN PEDRO California 



m. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

-»27 l-ROrsT STREET SArX REORO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to Inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stifl, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 
Medicines, Soaps and Toilet Articles 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

Wa Call and Deliver 

The French Dye Works 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cai. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Alex Eduard Malmberg, born 
Malmo, Sweden, 50 years old, tall, 
blond. Mr. Malmberg has been a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific in 1908. 

Torgen Sophus Thomsen, born in 
October, 1886, at Sonderburg, Schles- 
wig-Holstein, Germany, last heard of 
in April, 1907, at Montreal, is inquired 
for by his parents. Address Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building, San Francisco. 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




INFORMATION WANTED. 
Hans Merz, who went to Alaska in 
the spring of 1910 on the schooner 
Ottilie Fjord, and upon return left the 
vessel in Taconia and has not been 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Will Martin Billington, who was 
employed at Hallverville Cannery last 
summer, communicate at once with 
F. R. Wall, attorney for Otto Schel- 
lin, 324 Merchants' Exchange, San 
Francisco? 

A.idrew .\ndersen. a native of Twe- 
destrand, Norway, is inquired for. 
Address. Coast Seamen's Journal. 



San Pedro Letter List, 

.Vndersen, ,\xil R. Kalow. Robert 

Anderson. A. -1447 Karlson. Ragnar 
Anderson. V. -1630 Lister, W. 

Ambre, Francesce, I-utten, Theo. -16.53 

-555 Larsen, Ma.xsle 
Andersson, O. -1363 I^arsen, Krlstian 

Anderson, Anders Ludvlksen, A. -1249 

Andersen, Hans C. l^aine, E. 

Anderson, Sam I..under, Bjorn 

Anderssen. Hllding Murie, T. 

Anderson, Chas. Muhlberg, Arnold 

Berndt. Hugo Madsen, M. J. 

Berg. H. T. Martin, Wm. 

Berggren. Otto Makinen, Karl 

Buchtman, F. Mathlesen, N. -129B 

Boardsen. S. Martinsen, Martin 

Bulander, B. B. Meyer. H. -1192 

Berntstn, Fred Mahngren, E. 

Berner. Axel McRae. A. 

Backlund. Jolin Mellerup, Jen.s 

Carlson. Oskar Meyer. H. -1792 

Christensen, A., Martin. .John B. 

-1325 Miller. Charles 

Christensen, L., Nyman. Gustav 

-1360 Nielsen. Lauritz 
Christen.sen, LorentzOchmichen. Fred. 

Oaugal, A. Olsson, A. P. -1109 

Demp-sev. Harry Olsen, Harry -766 

Eokart, Th. G. Ossis, Andrew 

Eri<kson. Edward Olsen. O. S. -1123 

Engstrom. Richard Olsen, Anders 

Eugene. John Olsen, Hans C. 

Fors. A. Peterson, .John 

Frank. Maurice Petersen, Lauritz 

Fuss, H. Peterson. O. 

Felsch. Chas. Rasmussen, S. Soren 

Fasig. T>on Richter, Richard 

Fischer. W. Roed. Leif 

Fischer. .T. -566 Raymond. J. 

GlaasR, Gustav Strahle, Carl 

Gouda, C. Sievers. Herman 

Gravier. Eugene Sandseter, Henry 

Graf. Otto Schneider, Henry 

Hansson. .Johannes Smith. EM. 

Hanspn, Nikolai Salo, Cha.s. A. 

IlHKcn. Sigurd Stube. Harry 

Movev, Andrew Sandell. John 

Hal.sten. Axel Slattery. W. H. 

Holmes, Oscar Stephan, M. -145.'i 

Hriii.'sen. Almar Swansson, Hugo 

Holmes. Alex. Sundstrom, F. 

Holm. Carl Scott, Ed. 

Heltwnod. O. S. Samuelsen, Victor 

Halvorsen. H. E. Snow, W. 

Hansen, Berger Smith. J. S. 

Hoghmd. J. A. Thorsen, Johannes 

Hod. Fred Tillman. Charlie 

Irwin. Robert Thornlund, John 

Infopssen, Jon TTdby, Harald 

John.son. Gunnar tUby, Carl 

Jacobsen. Jiihn Wassernian. Hans 

Jnhnsen. Ernst Wasserman. M. -1262 

Johnson. Ixiuis M. Youngson. E. 

Johnson. Hans -1422 Yuhnke. W. (Reg. 
.lohansen. Ernest Letter P. O.) 

.Tones. Harry Zimmer, Walter 

Johnson J. A. Zimmerman. Fritz 

Klahn, K. Zorning, Arthur 
Kusik. M. 

Kallas. A. -921 Photos and Packages 

Iving. W. B. Grossl. Joe 

Kallas. Martin Pothoff. Harry 

Krinkel. J. Raustanius. J. 

Kuhne, W. Schultz, Albert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Nielsen, from Aarhus, Den- 
mark, is inquired for by Christ Han- 
sen, 230 W. Thirty-second street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 

The U. S. District Court in New 
Orleans has decided the case of John 
Kauer vs. the SS. Dover in favor of 
the libelant, and the New Orleans 
Agent has collected the money. Any 
one knowing the address of John 
Kauer, please communicate with the 
Sailors' Agent in New Orleans, 
George C. Bodine, 514 Dumaine St. 

Lott Bartlett Walls, who has been 
sailing for years between San Fran- 
cisco 9nd China, is inquired for by 
his brother, John M. Walls, 2722 
Thomas street, St. Louis, Mo. 

John Percy Bawden, age 29; 7 
years on the Pacific Coast; last 
known address 52 Mission, is inquired 
for by his mother, Mrs. Bessie Baw- 
den, 5 York Rd., Seacombe, Ches- 
hire, England. 

M. Samuelson, born in Gottenborg, 
Sweden, age about 44, last heard of 
in Honolulu, is inquired for by his 
nephew, A. Johnson. Address, Sail- 
ors' Union of the Pacific, San Fran- 
cisco. 

John J. Griffin, No. 8107, L. S. U.. 
last heard of at Baltimore, Md., in- 
quired for by his sister, Mrs. Allen, 
4749 Ontario St., Chicago, 111. 

Richard Standish, an English en- 
gineer, who left the S. S. Kansas 
City in July, 1909. Information want- 
ed by British Consulate, San Fran- 
cisco. 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The last steamer left White Horse for Dawson 
on October 6, and the Upper Yukon River will 
be closed to navigation within a week. The 
smaller streams are already frozen over. 

The steamer Edith, which went aground on 
Level Island, Sumner Strait, Alaska, on October 
2, was pulled oflf on the 4th by the United States 
cable steamer Burnside. The Edith was undam- 
aged. 

George Schroth, widely known as the lone sur- 
vivor of the crew of the frigate Independence 
when she entered San Francisco Bay in 1854, died 
at the Veterans' Home at Yountville, Cal., on 
October 4, at the age of 80 years. 

Advices to San Francisco from London state 
that the British ship Wiscombe Park, previously 
reported in collision, has been beached at South- 
ampton in order to prevent her sinking. The 
vessel was destined for Victoria, B. C. 

When the British steamer Oanfa sailed from 
Seattle on October 4 for Liverpool via the Orient, 
she carried a cargo valued at more than $1,000,000, 
the most valuable part of it being a shipment of 
Alaska copper valued at $416,000. 

Announcement is made by the Canadian-Mex- 
ican line that if present plans are carried out a 
three-steamer service will be maintained to Salina 
Cruz after January or February of next year. At 
present there is a sailing every month for Mexi- 
can ports. 

For the second time wireless murmurings have 
been heard at the Golden Gate from Japan, 5700 
miles across the Pacific Ocean. Operator C. H. 
Kesler of the Hillcrest station of the United 
Wireless Company was startled on October 4 to 
hear the signals of the Japanese wireless station 
on the Island of Hokushu. 

The whaling schooner Letitia, Captain Macom- 
ber, outfitted by Oakland parties, arrived at San 
Francisco on October 5 from a cruise in the Far 
North, logging twenty-five days from Bering 
Sea. She had a most successful season, report- 
ing a haul of 750 barrels of sperm oil, 50 barrels 
of whale oil and 500 pounds of bone. 

The keel of a new steamer for tlie Western 
Steam Navigation Company will be laid at the 
Craig shipyard in San Pedro this week. The new 
vessel will measure about 300 feet in length and 
will cost $300,000. Her design will be similar to 
the Navajo and General Hubbard, but she will be 
larger than either of these steamers. 

It is expected that the Norwegian steamer 
Christian Bors, chartered to load redwood at 
Eureka, will take 2,800.000 feet, the largest cargo, 
it is believed, to be shipped from Humboldt Bay. 
The Norwegian is now en route from the Atlantic 
Coast to San Francisco with coal for the Govern- 
ment, being sixty-three days out from Norfolk. 

The revenue patrol has left Alaskan waters for 
the season. The Thetis and the Rush have sailed 
for Japan. The Manning has left Unalaska for 
Port Townsend, Wash. On October 12 the Ta- 
homa will sail from Unalaska for the Pribylov 
Islands with the last mail. The Bear will remain 
at Nome until the last sealing vessel has sailed 
out of the North Pacific. 

Inaugurating a faster service between Hamburg 
and San Francisco via the West Coast, the Kos- 
mos steamer Acilia arrived at San Francisco on 
October 6 from Europe. She made the run in 
ninety-three days, which is nearly a month less 
than the steamers of the fleet usually take. By 
cutting out a number of less important ports of 
call on the West Coast the Kosmos Company is 
able to give shippers an improved service. 

Many sailing vessels on the way from Europe 
to the Pacific Coast are on the reinsurance list at 
Lloyd's. The reason is not because of the slow 
passages they are making, but from a report re- 
ceived recently at Lloyd's regarding a disaster 
to an unknown sailing vessel. The ship was seen 
to founder, but her name was not learned, and as 
a result between fifteen and twenty sailing vessels 
were posted on the reinsurance list at 4 per cent. 

It is reported from Astoria that differences be- 
tween the regular and independent pilots on the 
Willamette and Columbia rivers, in the territory 
embraced by Portland and Astoria, are adjusting 
themselves and it is expected that they will short- 
ly join forces. Since the independents entered 



the pilotage service less than a year ago rates 
have been lowered, and it is said that to-day they 
are 20 per cent, less than previously. 

The growth of the molasses traffic between 
the Hawaiian Islands and San Francisco is indi- 
cated by the fact that the Matson freighter 
Hyades is to be fitted with tanks in which she 
can carry molasses in bulk. Upon her arrival on 
the Sound the Hyades will be overhauled and re- 
fitted at a cost of $40,000. A certain grade of 
the molasses brought from Hawaii is used for 
making alcohol and a new kind of stock feed. 

Fifty-one days from Lifuka, in the South Pa- 
cific, the schooner Albert Meyer arrived at San 
Francisco on October 6. She brought 400 tons of 
copra. While the homeward passage was un- 
eventful, the Albert Meyer had the experience of 
going ashore on a coral reef outward bound. The 
mishap occurred in the Bahia passage. After be- 
ing fast for a couple of days the schooner was 
floated without having sustained any serious dam- 
age. 

A striking illustration of the advantages of 
water competition was furnished by a consign- 
ment of freight received at San Pedro from Ant- 
werp on the British steamer Chancellor of the 
Harrison Steamship Company. The Chancellor 
brought the freight around South America to San 
Pedro, a distance of approximately 12,000 miles, 
at a rate of $6.50 per ton, or about the same price 
as the rail haul on the same class of merchandise 
from San Francisco to San Pedro. 

J. H. Campbell has been appointed master of 
the schooner Jessie Matsen, vice Fred Matthie- 
sen; W. J. Moloney of the steamer Aberdeen, 
vice H. G. Nason; Berthel Carlsen of the steamer 
San Jacinto, vice Jorgen Hansen; Demetrious 
Manuel of the schooner Alice Stofer, vice John 
Arvanitopulos; John Olsson of the steamer Arabs, 
vice J. W. Darragh; Charles N. King of the 
steamer Alvina, vice W. H. Stoflfel; John Comber 
of the steamer Princess, vice Andrew Sprague. 

According to advices to San Francisco from 
London, the salving of the Canadian Pacific 
steamer Empress of China is almost hopeless. On 
September 9 the premium had advanced to 50 
guineas per cent. Two days later it had reached 
65 guineas, and on September 14 another step 
was made to 80 guineas per cent. This shows 
more than anything else the position in which the 
insurance underwriters hold her to be. The 
Empress of China was valued at $800,000. 

According to a report from Honolulu the 
schooner Sailor Boy will probably be condemned 
and sold at the Island port. After being ashore 
on Fanning Island, the Sailor Boy was floated 
and started on her way for San Francisco, but on 
September 13 she put into Honolulu leaking and 
with her main and mizzen masts broken. Since 
her arrival at Honolulu there has been consider- 
able difficulty regarding her crew and cargo, the 
crew demanding to be paid off, and the master 
making every effort to find a vessel in which to 
reship the copra cargo to San Francisco. 

The American bark Acme. Captain Park, has 
sailed from the Sound for New York and Bath 
with the largest cargo of lumber taken by a sail- 
ing vessel from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Her 
lumber is valued at $50,000 and, in addition to 
this, she has a shipment of pig lead for ballast 
worth $90,000. Some of the sticks taken by the 
Acme measure 130 feet in length and are 30x30 
inches thick. She has others 80 to 90 feet in 
length, 36x36 inches thick; 118 feet in length, 
24x24 inches thick, and a quantity of small stuff! 
She carries about 125 octagonal ship spars for 
Bath, the famous port of shipbuilders, where 
many of the fine old sailing vessels were turned 
out. 



SAILORS READ THIS! 

A company owning over twenty-one square 
miles of rich, well-watered lands, all free of debt, 
wants you to join them in raising sugar cane and 
cattle. You are guaranteed 6 per cent interest 
and you also share in the big dividends. 

Certificates are $100 each, payable cash, or $2 
each month until paid. 

Here is Your Chance to Make Money. 
Share in the profits of this great ranch. Secure 
an INCOME FOR LIFE. 

Write for free booklet, 

LOS HORCONES PLANTATION CO. 

710 Grosse Building Los Angeles, Cal. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives cl.iiins of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg. Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., ly^A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa.. 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS ANU "ATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 Ea.st Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 Broad. 

Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 53 St. Anne St. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 570 We.?t Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O.. 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 54 Main St. 
N. TONA WANDA. N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR. O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR. Wis.. 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
MARINE CITY, Mich.. P. O. Box 773. 
PORT HURON. Mich., 517 Water St. 
HURON. O.. Lake Seamen's Union. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO. N. Y.. 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1185 W. Eleventh St.. N. W. 
CHICAGO. 111.. 316 Kinzle St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKI!:E, wis.. 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA. O.. 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO. O.. Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR. Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y.. 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1101 W. Ninth St 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. 111.. 314 N. Clark St. 
A.SlITAnilLA. O.. 74 Bridge St. 
TOT,KiK). O.. 54 Main St. 
DR'I'ROIT. Mich.. 7 Ra.-Jt Woodbridge St 
PT. HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St. 
CONNK.MIT. O.. 922 l)av St 
OGI>KNSBnRG. N. v.. 70 Isabella St 
N. TONAWANDA. N. Y., 152 Main St. 
SIH'EUrou. Wis.. 1721 N. Third St. 
B.\Y CITY, Mich.. 108 Flftli Ave. 
ERIE, Pa.. 107 K. Third St. 

SOUTH CHICAGO. 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS I"N ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - J2.00 | Six months - - 11.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11. 1911. 



SEAMEN IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



The agitation for reform in the conditions 
of the seamen employed on steamers sailing 
out of British Columbia ports goes on apace, 
and with good results. As already noted in 
these columns, the evils of overtime and Sun- 
day work without extra pay have been fully 
exposed. Through the agency of the Sailors' 
Union in Vancouver several cases have been 
taken to court and decided favorably to the 
seamen. The effect of the Union's work has 
been to compel consideration for the seamen's 
rights on the part of the shipowners and to 
inspire the seamen themselves with a spirit 
of resistance to the gross impositions under 
which they have labored in the past. 

As an example of the working conditions 
on the British Columbia coast we publish here- 
Avith the log kept by C. F. Linden, a seaman 
on one of these floating workhouses : 

Joined the British Columbia at 9:30 p. m., Sept. 
4, 1911. Started work at 12 midnight, finished at 
3:30 a. m., Sept. 5th. Left Victoria at 3:30 a. m. 
Sept. 5th. Started vifork again at 7 a. m. same 
day to clean the holds out. Arrived at Ladysmith 
11:45 a. m.. made fast ship and went to dinner. 
Started work at 1 p. m. to scrape and paint hatch 
coamings, stopped work at 6 p. m. for supper and 
finished for the day. Day's work for Sept. Sth, 
ISyi hours. 

Ladysmith, Sept. 6. 

Started work at 7 a. m. Same work as yester- 
day afternoon, stopped for dinner 12 a. m. Started 
again at 1 p. m., stopped for supper at 6 p. m. and 
finished for the day. Sept. 6, 10 hours' work. 
Ladysmith, Sept. 7. 

7 a. m. started loading ship, stopped for din- 
ner at 12:15 p. m. Started at 1 p. m., finished 
loading coal at 2:30 p. m. and left Ladysmith for 
Victoria about 3 p. m. Deckhands washed down 
decks and scruhhed paint, finished cleaning ship 
and stopped at 5 p. m. Had supper, arrived in 
Victoria about 9:30 p. m., made fast the ship and 
finished at 10 p. m. Sept. 7, worked 10 hours. 
Victoria, Sept. 8. 

7 a. m. started work (General ship's work). 
Dinner 12 a. m. Started 1 p. m. and worked 
until after 5 p. m. Sept. 8, 10 hours. 
Victoria, Sept. 9. 

7 a. m. started work loading general freight. 
Dinner at 1 p. m. After dinner standing by to 
shift ship started and continued to load again un- 
til 6 p. m. While at supper we, the deckhands, 
were asked if we would work again after supper, 
the answer the mate got was "no."' When asked 
hy the mate if our intention was to work only 
10 hours out of the 24 and no work on Sundays, 
we told him that was our intention, but that we 
would work at all times and any length of hours 
if it was required for the safety of the ship and 
cargo, and all manner of work that may be neces- 



sary in connection with the safe navigation of the 
ship. Later on, the mate informed us that we 
would have to pay for substitutes at the rate of 
50 cents per hour, at which we protested. Sept. 
9, worked 10 hours. 

Sunday, Sept. 10. 

Left Victoria about 12:45 a. m. Thick fog at 
2 p. m. One deckhand employed on lookout and 
another acting messenger for captain. Got cargo 
gear ready and arrived at Sechart about 3:30 p. 
m. Made fast and stopped work. We. the deck- 
hands, refused to discharge cargo. Engaged long- 
shoremen who worked till 6 a. m. Monday. 

This day we did the necessary work about ship. 
Sechart, Sept. 11. 

7 a. m. started work, one hour for dinner, 
stopped at 6 p. m. While having our supper the 
mate asked if we were going to work again to- 
night. We answered we were too fatigued to do 
any more after working 10 hours hard going. 
Shoveled 220 ton.s of coal, si.x men in the hold. 
The Captain addressed me alone shortly after, the 
words used being: "Linden, you are not on the 
articles, I am finished with you. I will give you 
your money and you can go ashore. You can't 
work no more on board this ship and if you stay 
on board T will charge you for your meals at the 
rate of 25 cents per meal." T told him that I 
would stay on board until we get back to Vic- 
toria. 

Tuesday, Sept. 12. 

At sea, 7 a. m., started to clean ship, dinner 12 
a. m., started again 1 p. m. .\rrived at Kynquot 
about 2:30 p. m., made fast and commenced to 
work cargo crew, stopped at 6 p. m. for supper. 
Crew were not asked to work after that. 10 
hours this day. 

Wednesday, Sept. 13. 

7 a. m. started to discharge cargo. Two deck 
hands laid up sick (Clark and Seether) and my- 
self being fired there was only one man to turn 
out. Deckhand was asked to work again after 
supper, but refused. 

Longshoremen worked up to 6 a. m. next morn- 
ing. 

Thursday, Sept. 14. 

Rain, cargo work suspended. Deckhand stand- 
ing by doing odd jobs around ship. 

Kynquot, Friday, Sept. 15. 

Start work 7 a. m. All deckhands except my- 
self working cargo. Dinner 12 a. m. Start 1 p. 
m. Stopped 6 p. m. Deck hands were asked to 
work again after supper, but refused on account 
of being fatigued. At 7:30 that night they lashed 
the forward derricks and took in breast ropes, 
worked about one hour and came below. 

Longshoremen finished loading about 11:30 p. 
m. Deckhands were called to let the ship go 
about 5 a. m. Saturday morning. 
Saturday, Sept. 16. 

Left Kynquot at 5:.30 a. m. Deckhands went 
below and had breakfast, started work again at 
7 a. m., clearing up and cleaning ship in general. 
Stopped at 6 p. m. with one hour for dinner. 
Sunday, Sept. 17. 

9:45 a. in. got lines ready (deckhands) arrived 
at Victoria at 10 a. m. Deckhands were told to 
get derricks ready and get hatches off and to 
commence unloading cargo, but they refused on 
account of it being Sunday. 

Here we have the details of a fortnight's 
voyage, showing that the crew were kept con- 
stantly at work from 13j^ to 10 hours each 
day. On the two Sundays (September 10 and 
17) the men were ordered to work cargo, but 
refused to do so, for which they were logged. 
That is, those of the crew who were on the 
articles were logged, while Linden, who was 
not on the articles, was fired. Linden, how- 
ever, remained on board the vessel. Upon 
arrival at Victoria, five days later, he was 
charged $4 for meals! Linden is now suing 
for a month's extra wages, under the law 
covering such cases, and the return of the 
money deducted for meals. 

The steamer British Columbia, named in 
the foregoing log, is notorious for the bad 
treatment accorded her seamen. Many men 
have been logged for refusing to work cargo, 
in some instances after working 18 and 20 
hours on a stretch. Occasionally the money 
has been returned to the men when they have 
manifested a determination to fight. Now 
the matter will be threshed out in the courts, 
with a fair prospect of securing a decision 
that will put a stop to the workhouse methods 
in vogue in such craft. 

Another case of similar character is that of 
the steamer Vadso. The crew of this vessel 
were discharged at Port Nelson on Sunday, 
September 17, for refusing to w'ork cargo on 
that day. These men are now suing for a 



month's extra wages and the cost of trans- 
portation back to the port of shipment. 

The justice of these claims can not be de- 
nied. In fact, the fight put up by the seamen 
has already created widespread public senti- 
ment in their favor. Back of the whole agi- 
tation is the purpose, well-defined and deter- 
mined, to reform the conditions of the seamen 
on the British side, to bring these conditions 
into accord with those prevailing on the 
American side, both as to wages and as to 
hours of labor. 

This movement is bound to succeed, because 
it is founded in justice and because it is con- 
ducted intelligently and with all the motive 
power of a strong organization, under the 
guidance of a capable and tireless leader. 



STILL THEY COME! 



Amalgamated Society of South African Seafaring 
Men and Fishermen. 

Durban, Natal, August 19, 1911. 
Secretary Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 

Dear Sir: I am instructed by our Society to 
draw your attention to the fact that this Society 
is now founded on a firm basis, and as there are 
frequently a great many American seamen of all 
grades in this country, we would like you to 
recognize us, as other societies are doing all the 
world over. 

We shall be most happy to accept, care for and 
look after any members of your society that 
should at any time come to this country. They 
can be transferred to us from your own society, 
and we trust that you will accept any of our mem- 
bers into yours on leaving this country for Amer- 
ica. 

We are an international society, and as yours is 
a recognized society we shall be most happy to 
work hand in hand with you. 

We have also started what we call "The Inter- 
national Society of Seafarers and Fishermen's 
Reading Room," in connection with the Society, 
in which we hope to spend many happy evenings, 
and as we intend to supply the reading room with 
papers, periodicals, organs, etc., in the English, 
Norwegian, Danish, French, Swedish and German 
languages we should be very grateful if you would 
promise to help us and the reading room by 
sending us weekly or monthly contributions of 
American newspapers, organs or literature, which 
will be greatly appreciated by your countrymen 
here, and further that as most of your country- 
men and also those of England are already joined 
to their respective unions, it does not bring us in 
much income by way of entrance fees, subscrip- 
tions, etc., to work on and maintain the up-keep 
of the Society. We ofilicers are all honorary, and 
every bit of money received is spent in the cause. 
Perhaps you could help us with a small donation, 
which we assure you we can very much do with. 

Wishing your Society every success, believe me 
to be, on behalf of the Society, 
Yours very faithfully, 

D. J. OWEN, Secretary. 

The foregoing indicates the latest extension 
of the Brotherhood idea among the seamen 
of the world. Of course, the organized sea- 
men of South Africa are welcome to the fold. 
Secretary-Treasurer Frazier, of the Interna- 
tional, has replied to the foregoing letter, as- 
suring the comrades that transfers into the 
seamen's unions of the United States will 
gladly be granted upon the usual terms, name- 
ly, by the extension of the like privileges upon 
their part. 

Still they come ! The seamen of the world 
are up and doing, doing for themselves that 
which they have so long waited, but in vain, 
for the world to do for them. The seamen of 
all nations and ports are organizing, in fact, 
are already well organized. The "Brotherhood 
of the Sea" is almost upon us in fact and real- 
ity. The time for theorizing upon the possi- 
bilities of the future is no more. We are con- 
fronted with the facts of the present. No 
longer may it be said, "To-morrow is also a 
day !" To-morrow has arrived. To-day is 
TiiK day! "Get bu.sy!" is the command of 
the day, of the hour, of the moment. 

Let them come ! Let the seamen of all seas, 
of all tongues, of all flags, join hands, put 
their heads together and kick out for that one 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



great cause — justice to the seafaring craft 

OF THE WORLD. 

There's a light about to beam, 
There's a fount about to stream; 
There's a warmth about to glow, 
There's a flower about to blow — 
There's a midnight blackness turning into gray — 
Men of thought and men of action 
Clear the way! 



As we write (October 10) the people of 
California are making history, the efifect of 
which will be felt, not only in that State but 
throughout the country for a long time to 
come. The vote on the Constitutional amend- 
ments providing for the Initiative and Refer- 
endtmi, the Recall, Woman Suffrage, Work- 
men's Compensation and nineteen other propo- 
sitions will determine the place which the 
State shall hereafter occupy in the lists of 
progressive communities. Here's luck ! 



The ]\IcNamara trial begins in Los Angeles 
to-day. Given a fair hearing, there is little 
room to doubt the outcome. Contributions to 
the defense fund are still needed. These may 
be made either through this paper or direct 
to the American Federation of Labor, at 
Washington, D. C. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



DELEGATES' REPORT. 



San Francisco, Cal., October 8, 1911. 
To the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 

Comrades: — Your delegates to the convention 
of the California State Federation of Labor here- 
with report having attended the sessions of that 
body at Bakersfield, October 2-6, inclusive. 

There were present in the neighborhood of 
three hundred delegates representing unions in all 
parts of the State. The Secretary reported that 
the Federation had reached the high-water mark 
in point of membership, the number of paid-up 
members being approximately 50,000. During the 
past year 121 unions have affiliated with the Fed- 
eration and it is proposed to make a vigorous 
campaign during the coming year to get those 
unions that are still unaffiliated into the fold. 

The convention considered many matters of in- 
terest to the workers of this State, the most im- 
portant being the proposed amendments to the 
State Constitution providing, 

1 — For State Inspection of Weights and Meas- 
ures; 2 — Woman Suffrage; 3 — The Initiative, 
Referendum and Recall: 4--Emp1oyers' Liability; 
S — Giving the Railroad Commission power to reg- 
ulate transportation rates. .'Ml of which were ap- 
proved by the convention. 

Resolutions of sympathy and promise of con- 
tinued support, moral and financial, to the Mc- 
Namara Brothers at Los Angeles, were adopted. 

The strike of the Federated Shop Employes of 
the Harriman Railroad System was indorsed, and 
the strikers were promised whatever assistance 
the Federation can render. 

The strikes now pending in Los Angeles were 
also considered, and the affiliated unions were 
urged to continue the financial support so gener- 
ously furnished in the past. 

Boycotts were levied upon certain products 
manufactured under scab conditions in Los An- 
geles. 

Resolutions introduced by your delegates de- 
claring for the exclusion of Chinese from Amer- 
ican vessels, and a statement thanking the Fed- 
eration for assistance rendered in securing the 
passage of our bill to repeal Section 645 of the 
Penal Code, which made it a misdemeanor to en- 
tice a seaman to desert, were adopted. 

Comrade John W. Fricksen was re-elected 
Vice-President of the Federation and Comrade 
P. Scharrenberg was re-elected Secretary-Treas- 
urer, both by unanimous vote. 

The convention as t whole was very successful, 
the debate being very frank and open, and very 
instructive. 

Your delegates are more than ever convinced 
that the State Federation of Labor is serving a 
very useful purpose, in particular in regard to 
obtaining legislation, and in organizing the class 
of labor that can not be reached by any other 
agency, the so-called casual laborers. 

Respectfully submitted. 

H. MOLANDFR, 

FR. MEYER. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, 

E. ELLISON, 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG. 



TOW-BARGES AND LOG-RAFTS. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



wireless can bring help and save most of 
the lives, if the hole made be not too big; 
but you may some day read a record some- 
thing like this : "We have struck some- 
thing, seemed to be a log, got a hole in our 
bow, and we are sinking. Help !" The 
operator reports to the master and he at 
once heads for the vessel in distress. "We 
are sinking fast, we are clearing away the 
boats, be quick or you will not find us." 
The rescuer goes with all the speed pos- 
si])le but in a few minutes the operator gets 
one more message : "Too late ! Give our 

regards to the log-raft man. Good ." 

Money Saved. Lives Lost. 

And all this to save a few dollars in 
freight on a lot of lumber. The raft con- 
tained ten ordinary cargoes, the saving was 
about 50 per cent. 

A few dollars are saved ; but it is at the 
expense of reducing the value of legitimate 
vessels and sacrificing human life. It may 
be answered that so far no vessel has been 
lost in this way. So far as we know that 
is true ; but we do not know what sent some 
lost vessels to the bottom. From the point 
of view of the vessels that are built to do 
legitimate business this thing is without 
defense except that this log-raft business 
may be an improvement in the shape of a 
labor-saving appliance and thus be the 
cause of cheapening production. Cheapen- 
ing to the community. But that is not the 
case here ; the community pays the differ- 
ence in increased insurance, in loss to other 
legitimate interests and in danger when 
traveling. 

This takes no cognizance of the loss of 
lives, and even from a business point of view 
the labor power inherent in a human being 
has some value. From the point of view 
of the danger to human lives this system of 
transportation has no defense whatsoever. 
The raft-man finds that he can save a few 
dollars, and he very easily convinces himself 
that there is no danger involved in it. Any 
practical seaman can tell at once that this 
invention is one that has no regard for the 
lives of people who are on the sea. This 
raft can not be steered, therefore it goes 
where it will. The chances are that one in 
five, or so, may fail to reach its desti- 
nation ; some of them are sure to go on 
the beach or the shoal or be torn loose and 
then drift around until broken up. 

H. R. 11372, introduced by the Hon. Wil- 
liam B. Wilson, of Pennsylvania, will rem- 
edy this evil as well as the barge evil. It 
is to be hoped, as it certainly is expected, 
that this bill will become law in the present 
Congress. Andrew Furuseth. 



Demand the union label on all products 



The seamen of British Columbia are now 
making tlic fight wliich was made on tlic 
American side many years ago. The result 
will be the same in tlie one case as in the other. 
One important condition favors the men on 
the British side, namely, the backing of a 
powerful organization. The fact of their 
membership in the Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific gives them an advantage that makes the 
outcome as certain as anything human can be. 



Prof. F. W. Burstall, of the Birmingham 
University, has patented a small apparatus 
for the direct recovering of ammonia from 
gas. Low capital cost is claimed and small 
plant space. It is said to save $9.73 per long 
ton of sulphate. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



San Francisco, Cal., October 9, 1911. 

Regular meeting came to order at 7:30 p. m.. 
Geo. F. Stedman presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping quiet. The Quarterly Finance Commit- 
tee reported having examined the Union's ac- 
counts for the past tlirce months and found same 
correct. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary, 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 1, 1911. 
Situation very encouraging. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1,%5. 



Tacoina Agency, Oct, 2, 1911. 
.Sliipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent, 
2218 North 30th St. Tel, Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 2, 1911. 
.Shipping and i)rospects poor, 

P, B. GILL, Agent. 
1.312 Western .\ve, P. O. Box 6.5. Tel. Main 

4403. 



Port Townsend .Agency, Oct. 2, 1911. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slack; pros- 
pects uncertain, 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229y2 Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel, 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 2, 1911, 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 2002. 



Portland, Ore., Agency, Oct. 2, 1911, 
Shipping dull: prospects poor, 

D. W, PAUL, Agent, 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka .Agency. Oct. 3, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping good. 

ALFRFD PETERSON, Agent pro tem. 
227 First St. P, O. Box 64. Tel, 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct, 2, 1911. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67, Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu .Agency. Sept. 26, 1911. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Fr;>ncisco, Cal., Oct. 5, 1911. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed, Andersen in the chair. .Secretary re- 
ported shipping quiet, plenty of men ashore. 
The report of the Quarterly Finance Committee, 
finding books, cish on hand and in banks correct, 
was adopted as read. 

EUGENE .STEIDLE, Secretary 
Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 27, 1911, 
Xo meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
1003 Western Ave. P. O. Box 1335. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 



San Pedro .Agency, Sept. 27, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; prospects good. 
I'lentv of cooks ashore; scarcity of waiters. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box .54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Chicago, Oct, 2, 1911. 
.Situation unchanged, 

VICTOR A. OLANDER, Secretary. 
570 W. Lake St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters. Boston. Mass., Oct. 2, 1911. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

WM, H. FRAZIER, Secretary, 
IJ/^A Lewis St. 



DIED. 

Cornelius John Koster, No, 846, a native of 
llolland, aged 32. died at Nevis, Phnnjis County, 
("al., on Oct. 6, 1911, 

John Joseph Moriarity, No. 1490, a native of 
Ireland aged 47, <lied at San I'rancisco, Cal,, on 
Sep'.. 17, 1911. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^^^^ 



OIN THE GREAT LAKE3, 



( Contribuled by ihe Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




PASSING OF MR. ROOT. 



Comrade Olander, General Secretary of 
the Lake Seamen's Union, and Second Vice- 
President of the International Seamen's 
Union, deserves great credit for exposing 
Detective ( ?) Root, of the Mutual Detective 
Training Association of New York. 
Whether Root has been able to do the sea- 
men's movement any harm, or whether he 
was in the employ of the vesselowners, has 
nothing to do with the case. He was a 
member of the Firemen's Union and a mem- 
ber of the Tug Firemen and Linesmen of 
the Lakes, and being also a member of the 
aforesaid Detective Training Association 
would not be a desirable member for any 
union. 

I remember, a few years ago, when quite 
a stir was caused in the Marine Cooks' 
I'nion because one of its sub-agents chose 
to join the State Police, and he was de- 
feated for office in the next election. 

Root evidently was preparing himself to 
sell information to the vesselowners, if, in- 
deed, he had not already done so. It is 
quite possible that, as Comrade Olander 
says. Root is to be blamed as the cause of 
some or most of the turmoil which has dis- 
turbed the progress of the Firemen's Union 
during the past year or two. I do not be- 
lieve, though, that Root or any other in- 
dividual can permanently wreck the Sea- 
men's movement, or any other movement of 
the workers toward the goal of imiver.sal 
freedom and equality. 

The movement .is too big, it means too 
nuich to humanity, to be sto])pe(l, and its 
progress (though sometimes we think im- 
patiently that it is too slow) is as sure as 
fate, moving ever forward in its appointed 
course, foreordained to victory. Every 
strike, every labor organization which 
springs up and in the course of time wanes 
or disappears, every strike, whether lost or 
won, is only a particle, a cog in the great 
machine, each doing its allotted part and 
making way for the next, and so on and on, 
continuing the work of education among 
the workers, drawing ever nearer and nearer 
to its goal, as determined and as resistless 
as fate itself. 

Labor leaders come and go. They blos- 
som in a night, do their alloted task toward 
the final coming of the great reward, then 
they disappear. And always there is some 
one to take up the task, some one who may 
profit by the knowledge gained by his 
predcces.sor, and so, making fewer mistakes, 
move his cause ahead just that much more. 
Comparing this movement to the progress 
of a great machine, detectives of the Root 
type are merely a little grain of sand in the 
bearings, and can not retard the great move- 
ment any more than that. The movement 
is too big, it is too great a benefit to human- 
ity, to be stopped by anything less than the 
Divine power, and if^we believe in God, and 
in the Divine power for the ultimate good, 
we must believe also in this great move- 
ment for the benefit of man. 

W. IT. Jenkins. 
Conneauf. O. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



MORE "HELLFARE." 



Five bids ranging from $20,000 to $32,000 for 
the wrecked steamer Ervvin L. Fisher were opened 
at the office of the underwriters' representative 
at noon yesterday. The highest bid, which was 
made by New York parties, is about half of 
what the boat was appraised at in her damaged 
condition. 

The second highest bid, which was $30,500, 
was made by C. P.. Calder, general manager of 
the Toledo Shipbuilding Company. It is thought 
that .Mr. Calder bid for Cleveland parties. 

It is not likely that the bid of $32,000 will be 
accepted by the underwriters, as that figure is 
considered too low. The bids were cabled to 
London and no action will probably be taken for 
several days. 

A survey was held on the Fisher when she was 
placed in dry-dock at Ecorse some time ago and 
the boat was appraised at $64,000. Experts that 
examined the wrecked boat figure that it would 
cost about $35,000 to put her in the same shape 
she was before the collision. 

The Fisher, which was owned by the Argo 
.Steamship Company, of this city, was sunk in the 
lower Detroit River by the steamer S. M. Clem- 
ent last May. The steamer, which was insured 
for about $105,000, was abandoned to the under- 
writer.s as a constructive total loss, and they set- 
tled with the owners on that basis. 

The Great Lakes Towing Company was award- 
ed the contract for floating the steamer and de- 
livering her at a port of repair for $.39,000, or 
40 per cent of the appraised value of the property 
recovered, including the cargo. The boat was 
raised and delivered at Ecorse. The underwriters 
have decided to pay the towing company 40 per 
cent of the appraised value of the property re- 
covered, which will amount to something less 
than $39,000, which was the figure named in the 
bid of the towing company. 

The Fisher's cargo consisted of 700 tons of 
steel rails and about 1.500 tons of coal. The 
rail.s were sold on dock at Ecorse and the price, 
it is understood, was $12 a ton, which would 
amount to $8,400. The coal cargo, which was 
lightered before the boat was taken to dry-dock, 
was sold at Amherstburg. 



In Canadian Waters. 

Dilroit. September 28. — Observations taken 
by direction of Colonel C. McD. Townscnd, 
United States engineer, show that the steamer 
Joiict. which was sunk in St. Clair River at 
Port Muron. in collision with the steamer Henry 
Phipps, September 22, lies in Canadian waters. 
Unless the wreck is removed by the Pittsburg 
Steamship Company the w-ork of clearing away 
the obstruction will fall on the Dominion Gov- 
ernment. .At the point where the wreck lies, the 
river has a depth of thirty-seven feet. The 
steamer's deck is under fourteen feet of water. 

■Will Mark -Wreck. 

Captain W. \V. Smith. SuperiiUendent for the 
Pittsburg .Steamship Company, left Detroit at 
noon yesterday with the T^ake Carriers' lightship 
Kewaunee, which he will place at the head of 
the wrecked steamer Joliit. sunk in the St. Clair 
River. In addition to good lights the Kewaunee, 
which was formerly stationed at Southeast Shoal, 
has a fog whistle. 

The Kewaunee will remain in her new station 
until the wreck of the Joliet is removed. 

It has been decided to blow up the wreck, as 
it would be too expensive to try to raise her. 
Sailor Pleads Guilty of Forgery. 

Lorain, September 26. — Frederick Reese, the 
sailor who was indicted on three counts for 
forging checks stolen from the steamer Mesaba 
and who was arrested after passing one of these 
checks on a local man. was to-day arraigned in 
the common pleas court at Elyria. He pleaded 
guilty to the charges and will be sentenced to- 
morrow. Reese was arrested by the Lorain po- 
lice, who located him in a hospital in Toledo, 
W'liere he had been confined by reason of having 
had his foot cut off while alighting from a freight 
train. 

Ore Carrier Hits Bottom. 

The steamer E. H. Gary, bound for Lorain 
with ore, struck at W'alpole Island in the St. 
Clair River, and she is leaking some forward. 
Her pumps keep the water down. Repairs can 
be made without docking the steamer. The acci- 
dent was caused by something going wrong with 
the steering gear. 

Marine Notes. 

The steamer E. H. Gary, which went ashore 
on Russells Island, has twelve plates and fifteen 
frames that will have to be repaired. She will be 
in drydock at Toledo about a week. 

Masters of the steamers Angeline and Thomas 
Walters, which were in a touch and go collision 
June 17. in Whitefish Bay, have been exonerated 
by the Steamboat Inspectors at Marquette. The 
accident was attributed to fog and was una- 
voidable. 



INDEPENDENT (?) VESSELS SOLD. 



The deal for two more of the big freighters of 
the Commonwealth Steamship Company, which 
was on for several weeks, was finally closed on 
September 26. A member of the sales committee 
of the steamship company announced that the 
steamer Henry A. Hawgood was sold to Captain 
W. C. Richardson and that R. L. Ireland, of M. 
A. Hanna & Company, took the steamer William 
A. Hawgood. Messrs. Richardson and Ireland 
have paid in the money, he .said, and have taken 
charge of the boat. 

The boats were sold for $225,000 each. The 
Henry A. Hawgood, which was brought here 
from Buffalo this week, has been in commission 
for some time, and Captain Richardson will op- 
erate here during the balance of the season. 
She is at the shipyard making some minor re- 
pairs, and she will be ready to load coal in a 
few days. 

The steamer William A. Hawgood has not been 
fitted out. She is laid up at Buffalo and may not 
be started this season on account of the scarcity 
of cargoes in the ore and coal trades. Mr. Ire- 
land will turn the boat over to M. A. Hanna & 
Company and she will be operated by one of 
the companies managed by that firm. 

The two steamers are of the same general 
dimensions. They are 552 feet over all, 56 feet 
beam and 31 feet deep. The Henry A. Haw- 
good was built in 1905 and the William A. Haw- 
good came out the following year. The boats, 
which have a carrying capacity of 10,000 tons, 
are in good shape. 

This deal makes four steamers of the Common- 
wealth Steamship Company that have been sold 
during the past month. The steamers .Arthur 
H. Hawgood and W. R. Woodford were bought 
by the Inland Steel Company and will be man- 
aged by Hutchinson & Company. Both boats 
are laid up at Milwaukee and will not be placed 
in commission this season. 

The Commonwealth company still has the 
steamers Al)raham .Steam, J. Q. Riddle and 
.Sheldon Parks. It was announced yesterday 
tliat no more boats of the fleet would be sold. 

The Sheldon Parks was started some time 
ago but she was tied up at Escanaba in a claim 
for insurance. 

It is not likely that the Riddle and Steam will 
be started on account of the poor outlook. A 
meeting of the directors of the company will be 
held to-day when a decision will probably be 
reached on that point. 

I. N. Pennock. president of the Commonwealth 
Company, slated that so far as the steamers 
Henry A. Hawgood and William A. Hawgood 
are concerned, that action against the American 
Shipbuilding Company to take the boats of the 
fleet back at the original cost would be dropped. 

That agreement was made before the sale was 
closed, and such action was necessary in order 
to give the new owners a clear title to the boats. 

So the war continues. It has not proved 
profitable business to join the Steel Trust 
in its fight on the Lake seamen's unions. 
P. T. Barnum was right when he said, 
"There's a sucker born every minute." Oh. 
yes, I know the other thing he said, but he 
said this too, or should have. 

Conneaut, O. W. H. Jknkins. 



WILL TEST NEW SYSTEM. 



When the steamer Eastern States, of the 
D. & C. line arrives at Detroit from Buf- 
falo she will have installed a section of a 
new automatic fire alarm device which is 
being promoted by Richard Croker, former 
head of New York City's fire department. 
Mr. Croker, who resigned as fire chief of 
the metropolis in order to devote his atten- 
tion to the prevention of fires throughout 
the country, will visit Detroit later, when all 
the new plant has been set up in the East- 
ern States, and personally demonstrate the 
superiority over all other devices of the 
kind, which is claimed for it. If the device 
operates successfully, the D. & C. line will 
sign a contract for its installation on the 
new steamer City of Detroit, which was 
launched at the Wyandotte yards of the De- 
troit Shipbuilding Coiripany on October 7, 
according to General Manager .\. A. 
Schantz. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MORE STORAGE CAPACITY. 



Despite the fact that grain is being re- 
ceived at Buffalo faster than it is being 
shipped to the East, elevating interests look 
for no congestion this fall. The receipts up 
to the present time are about 9,000,000 
bushels in excess of last season's figures for 
the corresponding period. 

The big steel grain storage tank, which for 
the last six months has been in the course 
of construction at the Eastern elevator, has 
been completed and will be ready to receive 
grain within a few days. The tank has a 
capacity for 160,000 bushels of grain. It 
is 85 feet high and S5 feet in diameter. This 
with the other eight large receiving tanks 
at the Eastern elevator brings the capacity 
of the house up to more than 3,000,000 Inish- 
els, one of the largest in the harbor. 



WARNS CAPTAINS AGAINST SPEED. 



George H. Banks, United States junior 
engineer in charge of the Portage Lake 
waterways, actuated by numerous com- 
plaints that steamers were running through 
the ship canal at a speed much greater than 
the legal six miles per hour, recently has 
timed a number of steamers and found that 
the complaints were well founded. 

The captains of the offending steamers 
have been written to and given a warning 
that unless the speed limit is conformed to 
it may be necessary to impose fines. Mr. 
Banks says that if the Navy Department 
once traces down a case of speed law viola- 
tion it will not stop until the penalties pro- 
vided in sucl; cases are exacted. 



CANADIAN ROAD HAS BOAT PLANS. 



Sir Donald Mann, vice-president of ihc 
Canadian Northern Railroad, has officially 
confirmed the report that the company has 
plans out for a complete fleet of passenger, 
])ackage freight, and grain carriers for the 
Great Lakes. The boats will operate be- 
tween the head of the Lakes and Canadian 
Northern terminals on Georgian Bay. Ships 
will be completed for season of 1913, by 
which time terminals will be erected here on 
sites already purchased. 

Canadian Northern line between Duluth 
and Virginia, Minn., completing direct route 
to Winnipeg and western Canada, will be in 
operation by November 1. 



IS MAXIMUM SIZE. 



Frank E. Kirby, Detroit ship designer, 
declares the new steamer City of Detroit 
HI., being built for the D. & C. line at Wy- 
andotte, is the absolute maximum in size 
that can be successfully operated on the 
Great Lakes. 

Mr. Kirby says it is not possible for a 
larger sidewheel steamer to be built to en- 
ter fresh water harbors unless the harliors 
are enlarged. 

General Manager Schantz, of the D. & C. 
line, is going to Buffalo, where he promises 
to make arrangements for docking facilities 
for the boat. 



The steamer Case, bound up loaded with 
coal, returned to Port Huron leaking badly. 
It is expected that her top side will have 
to be recalked before she can proceed. 



CHECK ON POWER PLANTS. 



Following an interval of several weeks, 
during which power companies, operating 
on the American side of the international 
boundary at Niagara Falls, have been free 
of Government surveillance, the War De- 
partment has instructed the United States 
Lake Survey office at Detroit, lof which 
Lieutenant-Colonel C. ,S. Riche is in charge, 
to resume supervision of power plant opera- 
tions at the falls. 

Under the Burton Law, which expired 
June 29, the Lake Survey office was dele- 
gated by the War Department to have su- 
pervision of the power plants in controlling 
the quantity of water diverted from Niagara 
River for power purposes, the object being 
to assure maintenance of the scenic gran- 
deur of the falls by preventing diversion 
of an amount of water so great as to im- 
pair the falls. 

The appropriation for meeting the expense 
of this work terminated with the end of 
the fiscal year. As it was supposed the 
joint commission, representing Canada and 
the United States, which was arranged for 
under treaty agreement, would take up the 
work at the expiration of the limit set by 
the Burton Act, no provision was made for 
continuing the supervision of the power 
plants by the War Department. Just be- 
fore Congress adjourned, the Burton Law 
was reenacted to remain operative until 
March 12, next year. 



CHANGE WORKING PLANS. 



A change in the plan of breakwater con- 
struction has been made for the work at 
Conneaut. Colonel John Millis, LTnited 
States engineer, recently sent out the fol- 
lowing notice to mariners : 

The work on new breakwater construction 
at Conneaut harbor will begin on the west 
outer breakwater at a point about 1,000 feet 
northwest from the outer light, instead of 
commencing by extension of each break- 
water lakeward as previously stated. Nec- 
essary buoys and lights will be placed to 
mark the new work and contractor's plant, 
of which further notice will be given later. 

The lighthouse tender Camelia has left 
lUiffalo for the Coast. She is en route to the 
Gulf of Mexico. 

The bark Winnipeg struck an obstruction 
near Kingston and sank. She had 1,200 tons 
of coal aboard. Eight feet of water over the 
vessel's decks. 

Weddell & Manley of Toronto have been 
awarded the contract for the constructing of 
a winding basin in the Wclland Canal at 
Theroid. 



CANAL MEN GET RAISE. 



All Government employes on Canadian 
canals, including the St. Marys at the Can- 
adian Soo, are to receive increased salaries. 
Under the new schedule locktenders will 
draw $60 a month and bridgekeepers $55. 
Heretofore the salary of canal employes has 
been $1.50 a day. The higher rate of com- 
pensation is made to date from April and 
the canal men will receive an amount equal 
to the difference between the new schedule 
and what they have been receiving since the 
change was made operative. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



STRIKB 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persua- 
ding seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas Reid, marine fireman, 45 Assump- 
tion street, Detroit, Mich., is inquired for by 
his mother. 



Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



During- the last week Chicago shippers of 
grain added 1,000,000 bushels to the stocks 
ailoat in the harbor. Of this 100,000 bushels 
were wheat and 902,000 bushels oats. This 
is a little smaller increase than the week be- 
fore, but is in line with what was expected. 
There are now 605,000 bushels of wheat 
alloat and 3,817,000 bushels of oats, making 
a total of 4,422,000 bushels. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 
570 West Lal<e Street, Chicago, III. 
Telephone, Franklin 278. 
BPtANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 65 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA. N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 386. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

ERIE, Pa 107 E. Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 P. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 2863 South Chicago. 

HURON, O Lake Seamen's Union 

MARINE CITY, Mich P. O. Box 773 

PORT HURON, Mich 617 Water Street 

KINGSTON, Ont Box 96 

HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland. Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. S.aRlnaw. Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich, Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven. Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Mich. SlieboyKnn. Wis. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis, 

Ludington, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

l*Tanlstee. Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SONG. 

Men of the sea have suffered long 

From despotism's blight; 
Subjected constantly to wrong; 

Rarely conceded right. 
But now the clouds that lowered aloft 

Are scattered, and we see 
A gleam of that we've fought for oft, — 

The day that sets us free. 

CHORUS:— 

Fight on till each obstruction flies 

And withers, while we sing: 
The Union forever, boys. 

To it we'll always cling. 

Foul schemes to make a man a slave 

Must always be attacked; 
Free men will fight the gilded knaves, 

And their accursed pact. 
"Man's inhumanity to man" 

Has sown the seeds of strife; 
'Tis just to fight each sordid plan 

That balks a clean, free life. 

CHORUS:— 

Fight on, etc. 

Our ship has sailed o'er stormy seas. 

Braced sharp up, fore and aft; 
A change has come that brings a breeze 

To aid our gallant craft. 
Opposing elements abound 

To-day as in the past — 
So we must seek good holding ground. 

In some safe port at last. 



CHORUS:— 
Fight on, etc. 

Coos Bay, Oregon. 



STAR KEY. 



LIVERPOOL SHIPPING GAINS. 



The annual return of the Mersey Docks 
and Harbor Board for the year ended June 
30, 1911, shows a very satisfactory increase 
in the number of vessels using the port of 
Liverpool, their tonnage, and also in the 
various dues received. 

The number of vessels using the port 
amounted to 25,377 of 17,600,888 tons, com- 
pared with 24,961 vessels of 16,654,971 tons, 
during the previous year. There was again 
a falling off in the number of sailing ves- 
sels. The sailing ships engaged in the for- 
eign trade were last year 139 vessels of 
107,225 tons, compared with 175 vessels of 
147,751 tons in the year 1909-10. The coast- 
wise sailing vessels numbered 2,003 and 
their tonnage 151,442, as compared with 
2,125 vessels of 164,319 tons, in 1909. These 
include vessels paying dock tonnage and 
harbor rates. 

An all-round increase is shown in steam 
vessels. Dealing with vessels paying dock 
tonnage rates only, the figures given are : 
To or from foreign ports, 4,100 vessels, of 
11,341,884 tons, an increase of 252 vessels 
and 728,312 tons; and coastwise, 9,984 ves- 
sels of 2,129,874 tons, an increase of 25 ves- 
sels and 16,825 tons. 

Of steamers paying harbor rates only 
there were: Foreign, 1,701 vessels of 2,- 
495,158 tons, an increase of 115 vessels and 
198,546 tons; coastwise vessels, 7,450 of 1,- 
377,305 tons, an increase of 172 vessels and 
15,438 tons. Dock tonnage rates were thus 
paid upon 13,610,094 tons, an increase of 
710,167 tons, and hai;bor rates only on 
3,990,794 tons, an increase of 236,650 tons. 

The total revenue received by the Mersey 
Docks and Harbor Board, in respect of the 
traffic described, amounted to $6,899,047, an 
increase of $272,358, compared with the 
previous year. This is the total dues on 
vessels and goods. 



The rates received on vessels amounted 
to $3,635,873, an increase of $104,750, and 
was made up from tonnage and harbor 
dues, $3,399,644 (increase $44,733), graving 
dock and gridiron rates, $186,468 (decrease 
$16,526), and dock rent $49,754 (decrease 
$69,449). 

The dock rates on goods amounted to 
$1,763,152, an increase of $86,248, and the 
total of town dues on goods $1,500,015, an 
increase of $81,358. The chief increase 
in receipts was from the item "Dock ton- 
nage rates on foreign-going steamers," viz, 
$195,467. 

Explanation is made in the report that 
the tonnage shown represents the total net 
register tonnage of vessels paying rates to 
the dock board, inward and outward, as the 
case may be, and that to arrive at the total 
tonnage which left the River Mersey it is 
necessary to double the figures stated. The 
approximate tonnage, inward and outward, 
for the year ended June 30, 1910, would 
therefore be 35,201,767 tons. 



LABOR'S ecoNomc PLATrORn. 



HERTZIAN WAVES AS FOG SIGNALS 



As far back as 1908, at the Eighth Inter- 
national Navigation Congress held in Paris, 
the Lighthouse Department has had in 
mind the employment of Hertzian waves 
for the production of fog signals. Since 
that time it has always been at work on this 
question, aided by the military telegraph 
service. Foreign lighthouse services have 
become interested, but no special installa- 
tion of Hertzian fog signals is yet at work 
either in France or abroad. 

This delay was due to the difficulties 
arising from the interference of the signals 
with those of wireless messages from com- 
mercial and military stations and to the 
question of distinguishing the original and 
distance of the fog signals. 

Nevertheless, thanks to the progress 
made in these last few years in the recep- 
tion of the waves, the Hertzian fog signals 
are now in a position to increase consider- 
ably the security of navigators in foggy 
weather. 

The Minister of Public Works has now 
decided that the time is a fitting one to pro- 
ceed with the installation of suitably chosen 
Hertzian posts, which may be increased as 
they are needed and as improvements are 
made. He has ordered the establishment 
of three Hertzian fog signals, one on the 
lighthouse of Creach d'Ouessant, another 
on the He de Sein, and the third on the 
lightship Le Havre, which is to be moored 
about 7 miles from Cape Le Heve, at 
Havre. The characteristics of the three new 
signals will be as follows: 

Creach d'Ouessant lighthouse: A fog signal 
with the regular emission every 30 seconds of sig- 
nals producing in the telephone the note "ut 4" 
(523 double vibrations per second), and arranged 
so as to repeat, at least during 10 seconds, slowly, 
the letter "o" of the Morse alphabet. 

He de Sein lighthouse: A fog signal with the 
regular emission every 30 seconds of signals 
producing in the telephone the note "sol 4" (783 
double vibrations per second), and arranged to 
repeat slowly, during at least 10 seconds, the 
letter "s" of the Morse alphabet. 

On board the lightship Le Havre (in construc- 
tion): A fog signal giving, with a wave length of 
80 meters (262 feet), the regular emission every 
30 seconds of signals producing in the telephone 
the note "ut 4." and arranged so as to repeat 
slowly, during 10 seconds at least, the letter "h" 
of the Morse alphabet. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, e.xcept as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not e.xist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that tiiere shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Po.stal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 6.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 165 Cordova St., West. P. O. 
Box 1365. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOI>ULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



More than 51,000,000 cubic yards of earth 
had to be excavated for the Manchester ship 
canal. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

I'ORTLAND. Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 674. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, W^ash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, W^ash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be prni iind l'>' s.-.-iiiK'n .nt 
niiv of the aVjOve-nientloned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



does not give the judges the right to kill legis- 
lation. They are simply taking the right. Hold- 
ing the Constitution as a sacred and inviolate 
instrument when it concerns other people — and 
some folks think stretching a point when it con- 
cerns a few people — they forget that it does not 
give them the right to do some of the things 
they do. How about that? The courts must be 
the bulwark of the nation, and not the "bulwark 
of privilege," as they have been called. They 
can not be the nation's mainstay when their deci- 
sions on public matters displease the great mass 
of the people. And when some of those deci- 
sions are based on an usurped power you must 
begin to think about it. 



Machinists' Benefits. 

According to President O'Connell's re- 
port, members of the International Associa- 
tion of Machinists have been on the firing 
line 730 days in the past two years. They 
have engaged in 152 strikes, a majority of 
which have been won. They are now strik- 
ing at forty different points for increases 
in wages, reductions in the hours of labor, 
and better shop conditions. 

In two years the general office has paid 
in strike benefits the sum of $585,400.29, 
while contributions from the local lodges to 
pay non-beneficial members on strike have 
probably amounted to as much again. 

One hundred and ten new charters have 
been issued during the past two years, and 
to-day there are few points in the United 
States and Canada, where machinists are 
employed, where lodges of the Interna- 
tional Association of Machinists can not be 
found. 

Since the last report made, 73 great rail- 
road corporations, and 80 contract con- 
cerns have signed agreements with this or- 
ganization, and its power has been so far- 
reaching that even Haiti, in Hawaii, has 
a firmly established local union. 

In death benefits it has spent $93,325, 
and its local unions have paid, on a con- 
servative estimate, $100,000, for sick ben- 
efits. 



Will Probe Taylor System. 
Representative W. B. Wilson, Chairman 
of the House Labor Committee, has noti- 
fied President Gompers and Secretary Mor- 
rison, of the American Federation of Labor, 
that because of the general demand that the 
new Taylor System be investigated, the 
hearings would begin the week of October 
4, in the Hotel Touraine, Boston, Mass. 
Representatives of members of the unions 
employed in the navy yards and arsenals 
will be present at the hearing, and they are 
certain that they will be able to convince 
the committee that the introduction of the 
Taylor System would have a demoralizing 
effect on all Government work. 



Some Splendid Results. 
President Mahon in his annual report to 
the Amalgamated Association of Street and 
Electric Railway Employes of America 
shows that the union has accomplished 
great things for its members during the past 
year. Speaking on wage increases he had 
this to say : 

During the term there has not been a single 
reduction of wages anywhere; while upon the 
other hand 138 divisions have received increases 
in wages varying from one-half cent to ten cents 
an hour, and twenty of these divisions have had 
the second increase during the term. The wage 
increase affects 42.491 of our members and 
amounts annually to $2,356,900. The average 
per member for the year is $55.46. 

In addition to the increases that have been 
secured by our established divisions, in the at- 
tempt to organize unorganized cities, due to our 



agitation there has been given a number of wage 
increases, called by the companies voluntary in- 
creases. These increases, however, were made 
in an effort to prevent the organization of the 
workers. It has been impossible to secure ac- 
curate accounts of all these increases, but we 
have been able to figure on several of them and 
find that the wages of unorganized men have 
been increased $244,000 a year through the ef- 
forts of our organization. 

The report also shows that the hours of 
labor have been reduced in many cities and 
that obnoxious conditions have been elimi- 
nated through the efforts of members of the 

union. 



After the Man-Stealers. 

Five thousand people listened to and 
cheered the utterances of President Gompers 
in the Shrine Temple, Los Angeles. An 
excerpt from the address follows : 

An interpretation is now placed on the Sher- 
man anti-trust law that places unions in the po- 
sition of trusts. This law was enacted to pro- 
tect the people from the trusts and corporations, 
and they now propose to use it to control our 
minds, bodies and existence. On the morning 
after the decision was rendered by the Supreme 
Court dissolving some of the trusts for the vio- 
lation of this law their stocks raised in the mar- 
ket. 

Closing his address he made a reference 
to the McNamara case, now pending in the 
courts, in which he said : "Some months 
ago there occurred in this city the destruc- 
tion of a great building and the loss of many 
human lives. I doubt if there were many 
men on this continent not shocked to tears. 
It was an awful happening. But before 
the news of that catastrophe was flashed to 
the world half an hour there formed a chorus 
that pointed to union labor and charged it 
with the crime. 

My friends, when we heard this we knew the 
source of the accusation. We know men of labor, 
and we know crime is repugnant to men of labor. 
We know men of labor cannot be guilty of such 
a great crime. Our movement does not depend 
on crime and brutality and cannot succeed with 
crime and brutality. 

At the time of the accusation it was not known 
what caused the explosion, and it is not known 
now. We were shocked and our sympathies 
touched to the deepest. Again we were shocked 
when, months later, a detective and his man Fri- 
day — Burns and Hosick — went to Indianapolis to 
the offices of the Bridge and Structural Iron 
Workers, when J. ]. McNamara was lured away 
without warning, taken to a justice of the peace, 
asked if his name was McNamara, and when he 
answered affirmatively was ironed and taken 
3,000 miles away with no opportunity for good- 
by, no opportunity to secure a lawyer or defend 
his rights. 

No one can minimize a crime involving death 
<ind the destruction of property. It is our hope 
that such cases may be eliminated, but when 
the detectives go manstealing the public is en- 
dangered. Detective Burns has declared several 
times that the general run of detectives arc the 
worst and most unscrupulous scoundrels un- 
whipped, and all he has accused turn around and 
say he is another. 

Upon you and me devolves the duty of standing 
by men we know and having faith in their inno- 
cence. We shall stand by them at least until 
they have been declared guilty by a jury of their 
peers. At the same time we will prosecute to 
the full extent this man Burns. They wouldn't 
dare to kidnap Rockefeller, or Astor, or Vander- 
bilt. They wouldn't kidnap any of these trust 
magnates who sell their daughters to some worn- 
out count. 

We are after these manstealers, and let me 
say this in connection, congratulations and hats 
off to Governor lohnson of California for his 
actions and fairness in connection with the ex- 
tradition of Hosick. When an attorney came 
from Indiana with the papers for him the Gov- 
ernor gave him an opportunity to gain legal 
counsel and defend himself in the highest courts 
of the .State, and when he saw that everything 
was regular he signed the papers and sent him 
to Indianapolis to stand trial. 



For the McNamara Defense. 

At the convention of the New York State 
Federation of Labor, $100 was appropriated 
for the defense of the McNamara Brothers. 
The delegates also vohmtarily contributed 
a like sum for the same purpose. Resolu- 
tions condemning the kidnaping of the Mc- 
Namaras were also passed. 



A Short Strike. 

It took 1,500 members of the Amalgama- 
ted Association of Street and Electric Rail- 
way Employes less than a day to bring the 
United Railway Company at Detroit, Mich., 
to time. The men were getting twenty- 
three, twenty-five and twenty-eight cents an 
hour and wanted twenty-five and thirty 
tents an hour. The company refused to 
concede the demands of the union and as a 
result not a street-car ran until the trouble 
was settled. A settlement was reached in- 
side of twenty-four hours through arbitra- 
tion and the men were awarded a scale of 
twenty-three cents an hour for the first six 
months, twenty-seven and a half cents an 
hour for the next year and twenty-nine and 
a half cents an hour tlicreafter. The strike 
was well conducted. There was positively 
no disorder and not a man was arrested. 



A McNamara Parade. 

Organized labor in Philadelphia has de- 
cided to hold a McNamara demonstration 
on October 12, the date on which the trial 
of John J. McNamara is expected to begin. 

There was no Labor Day parade, the 
unions deciding to postpone it until the lat- 
ter date, when the hosts of labor will pa- 
rade the streets of the "City of Brotherly 
Love" as a protest against the un-American 
act of kidnaping the McNamara brothers. 



Bakers' Benefits. 

The Bakery and Confectionery Workers' 
International Union is a militant and benev- 
olent institution, as the following items of 
disbursement will show: From August \, 
1908, to August 31, 1911, it paid for strike 
benefits $84,610.62, and for sick benefits, 
$78,293.73. In the same period it issued 
1,491,966,090 union labels. 



Labor Is Not "Property." 

According to a decision of the Appellate 
Division of the Supreme Court of New 
York, labor does not constitute property. 
In handing down the decision Justice Mc- 
Laughlin said : "If labor constitutes prop- 
erty then it seems to me to necessarily 
follow that the right to labor must also 
constitute property, and whatever deprives 
the laborer of his right deprives him of his 
property." All of the justices concur. 



The silk manufacturers of the United 
Kingdom are reported to have made rep- 
resentations to the British Board of Trade 
for its assistance in requiring that artificial 
silk shall be honestly and fairly described, 
instead of, as is now said to be the case, fre- 
quently sold as genuine silk. The Silk As- 
.sociation of Great Britain and Ireland seems 
to be considerably troubled by the serious 
competition of goods made of artificial silk 
witli those made of genuine silk. It pro- 
poses to hold an exhibition next year to 
celebrate the twenty-fifth year of its estab- 
lishment. 



It is stated (hat the British Post Office 
will inaugurate an automobile service to 
carry the mails between Stafford and 
Rochester via Uttoxeter, a distance of 20 
miles, which will mean an earlier delivery 
of letters in the mornings. The service is 
later to be extended to other parts of Staf- 
fordshire. This service is a development of 
the policy of using automobiles to carry the 
mail.= vvherever practicable and profitable. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



Fire of incendiary origin swept 
through the business section of Scott- 
dale, Pa., on October 3, causing a loss 
of $125,000. 

The Laurier Ministry of Canada re- 
signed on October 6 and Premier- 
elect R. L. Borden has accepted the 
call to form a Cabinet. 

According to the circulation state- 
ment of the Treasury Department, 
the total money in circulation amounts 
to $3,242,182,715, a per capita of $34.35. 

Railroad traffic with Hermosillo 
and Guaymas, Ariz., has been inter- 
rupted indefinitely by the storm 
which raged in Sonora on October 
3 and 4. 

The town of Black River Falls, 
Wis., was swept by flood on October 
6, due to the sudden rise of the Black 
River. It is not known whether or 
not any lives were lost. 

The fourteen men who were en- 
tombed in the Shakespeare placer 
gold mine on Dome Creek, Alaska, 
were rescued on October 2, little the 
worse for their confinement of eighty- 
four hours. 

Eight indictments against four wall 
paper manufacturers and four \va\\ 
paper jobbers, cliarging conspiracy in 
restraint of trade, were returned by 
the Federal Grand Jury at Cleveland, 
O., on October 5. 

The total income of the Atchison. 
Topeka and Santa Fe system for the 
year ending June 30, was $109,772,481. 
The total expenses were $35,083,386 
and the fixed charges $12,712,319, leav- 
ing a balance of $21,371,067. 

If the plans of the quartermaster's 
department of the Pugct SouikI artil- 
lery district are carried out, the use 
of coal at the forts on the Govern- 
ment steamers will be discontinued 
and California oil substituted. 

Railroad companies are responsible 
for all damage done by forest fires 
started by sparks from engines on 
forest reserves, according to a de- 
cision of the United States Circuit 
Court of Appeals at Portland, Ore. 

The cost of running the govern- 
ment of New York City in 1910 was 
more than the combined expenditures 
of the fifteen next largest cities in 
the United States. The year's ex- 
penditures reached a total of $451,- 
900.000. 

The cotton crop of the growing 
season of 1911, which early in the 
year gave indications that it would 
be one of the largest in the history 
of the industry will be approximately 
13,868,337 bales of 500 pounds, or 
about 2(30.000 bales more than the 
record year of 1904. 

One of the most important lessons 
learned during the recent maneuvers 
in Texas was the necessity of keeping 
all troops, battery and company or- 
ganizations at all times at full war 
strength. The War Department has 
issued an order rearranging the 
strength of the Army. 

The exhaustive brief of tlie State 
of Oregon in the case of the Pacific 
States Telephone afid Telegraph 
Company to have declared unconsti- 
tutional the Initiative and Referen- 
dum law, is in the hands of the 
printer. The brief, which contains 
approximately 30,000 words, will be 
forwarded to Washington for filing 
in the United States Supreme Court 
within the next few days. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

When in port come up and give us a trial. 
The newest 25-cent house in town. 
New building, new furniture. 
Special attention to mariners. 



FREE BATHS 



Special Weekly 
Rates 



J. H. KLINE, Prop. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Residence Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 
Mate's and Pilot's License of all 
grades. Ocean, coast and inland 
waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. E. SNELLENBERG, 

Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses. 333 Globe Bldg., First 
Ave. and Madison St., Seattle, Wash. 




THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS 

615-617 Flr«t Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 



At 



WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 
220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

Seattle, Waah., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofllce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 

Jacobson. John 
Jensen, H. -1141 
Jensen, John 
Jensen, H. -2014 
Johansen, Ludvig 
Johanson, Olaf K. 
Johanson, Aug. W. 

-313 
Johanson, O. W. 

-139 
Johnson. John N. 
Johnson, Alf. -1700 
Johnson, Alex. 
Kalning, Jacob 
Karell, J. H. 
Kenny, J. 
Kittelson, C. T. 
Kiesow. P. 
Kirst, H. 
Knappe, Adolf 
Koptze. C. 
Kerwln, W. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kreutz, Karl 
Kroon, Z. 
Larsen, Alfred 
Lathi, J. H. 
Larsen, C. H. 
Lorin, K. 
Lundquist. John 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, O. P. 
Olsen, IJvor 
Olsen, J. H. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olssen, Frank 
Olsen. Erik 
Ommundsen, T. 
Osterberg. Gust. 
Paul, P. G. 
Peterson, Axel -1223 



Andersen, K. E. 
Andersen, J. G. 

-1534 
Kertelsen, Alf. 
Boe, E. L. 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlson, C. E. 
Dahlgren, A. 
Derdio. F. 
Dennett, J. 
Dell. Herman 
Elwood, J. 
Ellison, Chas. 
Ellifson, otto 
Elsted, J. 
Erikson, A. -1732 
Erikson, O. -606 
Erikson, Fridbjof 
Erikson, Aug. 
Eugene, J. 
Kager, J. 
Farnan, W. L. 
Fellix. P. 
Felix. L. 
Feeley. T. 
Fjelstad, K. M. 
Franzell, A. 
Oarbers, G. 
Hansen, C. J. -967 
Hansen, C. -1476 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Haak. C. 
Ilaga, A. A. 
Hanson, Harald 
Herman, Axel 
Henrikson, H. -1773 
Holmstrom. C. A. 
Holm, H. P. 
Iverson. Iver 
Ingebretsen, Olaf 
Jacklin, C. 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses ■ of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation In all Its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master. Unlimited: 
Puppt Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor In Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave. SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Suc-essful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Waah. 

My Work Is My Best Advertisement 

W. H. MIDDLETON 

TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, Cutter 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In Every 

Garment 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three doors south of James, SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telepiione or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13 



Vernon W. Buck .■\rthur C. McLane 

Ctrl (J. I',ei1-:<lll 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 
Lawyers and Praetors in Admiralty. 

I'Vee Advice to Seamen. 

764-5-6 Empire Building, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skritv;i de nordiska spr.iag. 



^^^»^^^^S^S^V%^A^VWS/%»%^W^/S^N^V>/N^>^VS»^/V",^>^NA^S^» 



Peterson, C. V. -644 
Petterson. O. -710 
Peterson. E. -668 
rteime, T. 
Reinink, H. 
Rcinliold, A. 
Kuunuk, H. 
Scetveit. J. 
Saar. J. 
Saniuelsen, A. R. 

-732 
Scott, Alf. 
Scarabosio, M. 
Schultz, Wm. 



Schafer, P. 
Satto, S. 
Stor, W. T. 
Suomlnen, Alex. 
Swenson, L. C. 
Swan.son, Gus 
Stor, W. 
Thocke. E . 
ToUefsen, Andrew 
Tergersen, Kasjjer 
Turner, T. 
Wilde. H. 
Zechel. W. 
Zwahlen, R. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

Brewed by 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLfF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 



C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second Street 



Eureka, Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Bror Utter, a native of Bornhus, 
Gefle, Sweden, last heard from in 
Xew York, in 190S, is inquired for by 
his parents. Address, Maskinisten 
Utter, Bornhus, Sweden. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: 

Gust Leyrle. arrived at Philadelphia, 
October 2, 1908, on ship Dirigo. 

Gustav Mattson and Victor Wilson, 
on schooner Charles Davenport. 
March, 1911. 

John McCauley, whose brother 
Cyrus McCauley (late of barge Har- 
risburgh) died in Marine Hospital, 
Philadelphia, on May 17, 1911. 



mmm 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 
Groceries and Notions 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - • - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen 

Trade vi^ith JUKKA SAHLSTEIN. 
New store. Everything is new and sold 
at right prices. 304 South F St., near 
Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen, Wash. 



SMOKE 
THE RED SEAL CIGAR 

' GRAND CIGAR STORE 

300 S. F. St., in front of Sailors' 

Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLES MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEGE- 
TABLES. Shipping supplied at lowest 
rates. Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Waterman ® Katz 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Complete stock of Ship Candlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, Etc., Etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



, »StPH880. ._,__ 

Issued by Autfioiitj' of Uie Ciga; MaKers' Imernational Union of America 




Union-made Cigars. 

Ullii @n1ifif$. TlwUuCljvjcaiuradlnUilsWbmtietoiniMlyariCt'CICSMlllini 
i KLKtsCR OF THC OtM lUlERl 'INTUUTIOHU UIIIOIIt< AMrka. ui wunizJtio itevoteil tl tt« ii- 
vdnctmoil of Ibe MuRfll.MATDiWjiii) iNrailQUAl W[LIAR£ Of Ih£ CRAM. ntnimmiKaiaai 

AU lafTingcOMUupofltJus LiUJidrbfl puMsbtd MCtfdinQtolM. 



FtC 
>•» SIMILE 



^ }1C (/li/{€u^. Pnadent, 
• ctrruof. 



-■■■<-km'}^^^^isi^a(^iah(Mit,.-,:ma^^^kmie>y!S)^.)'^iS'yi'i*B^ 




OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

h.Xmallek 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats. Caps, Shoes. Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust "Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 
Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall 2320 N. 30th Street, Old ToTvn 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WorKingmen's Store 

Importer and Dealer in 
Fine Custom and Ready- Made Clothing 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Clothing, 
Trunks, Valises, Etc. 

ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

23 N. Third Street Near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

Wanted 

By the United States Bureau of Labor, 
Washington, D. C, the following num- 
bers of the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Volumes 1 to 4 
Volume 5, Nos. 2, 20, 22, 27, 30 
Volume 6, Nos. 14, 17, 20, 31, 
45, 46, 48 

Anyone having any of the numbers 
indicated above will please communi- 
cate with the United States Bureau of 
Labor, Washington, D. C. 

RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 

GO TO THE 



Union Cigar Store 

For Your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 



MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 
Seattle, Wash. 



Areas, Chas. 
Barbo, M. 
Barnett, H. 
Bergstrom, F. 
Bradley, A. J. 
isushby, Mr. 
Bonnell, H. 
Brown, F. C. 
Brownlee, Tom 
Connolly, Tom 
Chivers, L. 
Engstrom, Swan 
Flores, Augstine 
Grace, Richard 
Giradelli, A. 
Hanlon, Jack 
Hedger, A. 
Laugan, Jas. 
Law, Willie 
Lawson, John 



Morris, Ernest 
Morgan, H. E. 
Morgan, L. 
Morris, John 
Moyes, Andrew 
Murphy. E. M. 
McCall, Wm. 
O'Farrell, Jas. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Parrott, I. 
Pierce, Claude 
Stacey, Frank 
Stollery, Joe 
Stevens, Jas. 
Stevenson, J. 
Tillbury, H. 
Tlnoco, Joe 
Taylor, W. 
Vanhear, Jas. 
Van Ermen, H 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Building, San Francisco, wants for 
the relatives in question, information 
regarding: 

Carl Jensen, born March 13, 1877, 
in Troelstrup, near Haslev, Denmark. 
Mr. Jensen has been a member of the 
Sailors' Union and was in 1907 on 
board the schooner Henry Nelson. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth. 
Sunderland, England. 

Carl Sofus Frandzen, born in Co- 
penhagen, February 11, 1881. Left 
Denmark in 1901 ; employed in United 
States Navy, 1902. His father wants 
to get into communication. 

Jesper Christian Jespersen, who has 
been a member of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific up to 1900. Has been 
employed on various life-saving sta- 
tions on the Pacific Coast and later 
on sailed a scow on the San Fran- 
cisco Bay. His brother in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
■vith him. 

George Ulrich Rune, whose ad- 
dress in 1909 was care of Sailors' 
Union Hall, Tacoma, Wash. His 
father in Denmark wants to get in 
communication with him. 

William Ernst Ludvig Hansen, 
called W. E. Hansen, a native of Co- 
penhagen, Denmark. Mr. Hansen was 
in 1907 in the employ of the Alaska 
Packers' Association at Karluk, Alas- 
ka. Since then nothing has been 
heard of him. His sister in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

Jens Peder Lauritz Pedersen, ma- 
rine engineer and fireman, born in 
Dalby, near Thureby, Denmark, April 
14, 1878, and supposed to have ar- 
rived in San Francisco in the winter 
of 1907-8, is inquired for by the Da- 
nish Consulate, 815 Mills Bldg., San 
Francisco. Cal. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



I'rancesco I. Madero was elected 
President of Mexico on October 1. 

The British Postmaster-General has 
decided to make no further experi- 
ments with aerial mails for the 
present. 

.\ heavy earthquake occurred at 
Port .\u Prince. Haiti, on October 6. 
The movement continued for thirty 
seconds. No damage was done. 

The Moroccan crisis has been set- 
tled, France's unlimited political sway 
in Morocco being maintained and 
Germany securing valuable territorial 
concessions in Congo. 

The famous Ashley Library, which 
is said to include the finest collection 
of English poetry in the world, was 
recently offered to J. Pierpont Mor- 
gan, who was willing to pay $400,000 
for it, 

A signal honor has been done to 
American art by the selection of the 
painter, Edward Steichen, of New 
York, to execute a large part of the 
mural decorations of the new Luxem- 
bourg Museum. 

Whalers who have been in Antarctic 
waters hunting whales are mostly of 
the opinion that the Norwegian, 
Amundsen, has the best chance of 
the rival explorers to reach the South 
Pole. 

The Bulgarian Minister to Con- 
stantinople on October 6 conveyed to 
the Porte the assurance of the neu- 
trality of Bulgaria, and also denied 
the report of a military mobilization 
in the kingdom. 

The Turkish battleship Feth-I- 
Bulend on October 6 held up and 
searched the British steamer Orchis, 
and, finding forty barrels of powder 
on board, brought the vessel to Sa- 
lonica as a prize of war. 

A great battle was fought at No- 
baran, fifty miles from Teheran, on 
September 28. Salaria ed Dowleh, 
brother of the desposed Shah, lost 
400 killed and 200 captured, in addi- 
tion to seven big guns. 

The assassin of M. Van Hellen. 
President of the High Court of Jus- 
tice at Abo, Finland, was identified 
on October 3 as a shopkeeper named 
Loefdayls, 24 years old. The author- 
ities state that the motive of . the 
crime was undoubtedly political. 

A group of Frenchmen hoisted a 
I'rench flag over the fort at Agadir, 
Morocco, on October 6, threatening 
grave international complications. 
The Caliph appealed to the com- 
mander of a German warship in the 
harbor, but he refused to interfere. 

Italy declared war against Turkey 
on September 29, on account of dis- 
puted rights in Tripoli. Hostilities 
were immediately begun by the laiul- 
ing of Italian troops in Tri-poli and 
the destruction of several Turkish 
vessels at Prevasa. Several hundred 
men were drowned. 

Tlie Turkish Government has de- 
ci(K(l not to oppose an armed resist- 
ance to the occupation of Tripoli. 
and, further, to take no measures 
against Italian residents in Turkey. 
The Government hopes by adopting 
that attitude that It:ily will not treat 
the Tripolitans as a coiuiucred peo- 
l.Ie. 

The Bank of Egypt, Limited, at 
London, Eng., suspended payment on 
September 26. In a notice to deposi- 
tors the directors say that advices 
from Egypt make it apparent that the 
hank can not provide sufficient cash 
to meet current obligations, and the 
company will file a liquidation pe- 
tition. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Rear-Admiral Winfield Scott Schley 
died suddenly of apoplexy at New 
York on October 2, aged 72 years. 

The wreck of the schooner Emma 
Knowlton has been sold at Bermuda 
for $100. 

The wreck destroyer Seneca has 
blown up the schooner Stella B. Kap- 
lan, which was sunk in Chesapeake 
Bay and was a menace to navigation. 

The schooner Stephen G. Hart 
from Jacksonville for Bridgeport has 
been abandoned at sea. Her crew 
were picked up and landed at Ber- 
muda. 

The British brig Lady Napier, St. 
John's, N. F., for Bahia, has been 
abandoned at sea. Her crew were 
saved by a vessel named Mildred and 
taken to St. John's. 

After being in collision with the 
steamer Millinocket off Plum Island 
on September 28, the schooner Oliver 
Mitchell was abandoned in a sinking 
condition. Her crew were taken to 
New York. 

The International Harvester Com- 
pany recently shipped full cargoes of 
agricultural implements to Russia on 
the Danish steamer Euxinia and the 
German steamer Augustus, from 
Baltimore. 

Two fruit steamers, the Barnstable, 
of the United Fruit Company, and the 
Thora, of the Atlantic Fruit Com- 
pany, are out of the fruit traflfic at 
Baltimore, their charters having ex- 
pired. 

It is said in shipping circles on the 
Atlantic Coast that the freight mar- 
ket is in a fairly good condition, with 
plenty of inquiries for tonnage space. 
In consequence there is talk of ad- 
vancing rates on certain commodities. 

Captain Louis N. Stodder, who was 
acting master of the Monitor through- 
out her career, died at Brooklyn on 
October 8, aged 74 years. Stodder 
was in charge of the turret guns in 
the famous duel with the Merrimac. 

The Harlan and HoUingsworth 
Company of Wilmington, Del., has 
obtained a contract to build a 240- 
foot steamer for the Baltimore and 
Carolina Steamship Company. The 
vessel will ply between Baltimore and 
Charleston. 

The Steamboat Inspection Bureau 
has given notice that grain alcohol, 
wood alcohol, and denatured alcohol 
may be transported on steamers car- 
rying passengers, provided they are 
not kept in a hot place, and are so 
packed as to prevent any leakage. 

After a three months' voyage, in 
which she was supposed to have been 
trading in Northern Labrador and 
Bafifins Land, the small steamer Kite 
arrived at St. Johns, N. F., on Octo- 
ber 2, bringing reports of a rich gold 
find in the dry beds and valleys of 
Baffins Land. 

An official ruling from Washington 
states that the rule requiring that 
hay, straw or other inflammable ma- 
terial carried on the deck of a steamer 
must be covered by a tarpaulin, does 
not apply to motor boats carrying 
passengers for hire, but only to ves- 
sels propelled by steam and over 65 
feet in length. 

When the Philadejpliia Maritime 
Exchange received news on Septem- 
ber 29 of the finding of the hull of the 
wrecked schooner Margaret A. May, 
30 miles south of Charleston, shipping 
men concluded that Captain George 
Jarvis and his crew had been lost. 
The vessel was capsized in the storm 
that prevailed about August 23 off 
South Carolina. 



San Franciaco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Franciaco Sallora' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months oniy and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall Is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Aass, Oscar 
Abrahamsen, Aslak 
Adolfson. G. 
Aga, Johan 
Alilotr, W. 
Ahvens, W. 
Albertson, Chris 
AlunU, Xure 
.\niundsen, Albert 
Andersen, Aksel 
Andersen, Peder 
Andersen, Nils 
Andersen, Andrew 
Anderson, Anders 
Anderson, George 
Anderson, E. B. 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson, Wille 

Baardsen, S. 
Backlund, John 
Baardsen, Georye 
Back, E. E. 
Balda, Alfonse 
Barwa. D. 
Barney, Chas. 
Bau. Martin 
Bauke, H. 
Bauman, Chas. 
Bausback, E. 
Beach. Fred S. 
Beck. Edward 
Belinv, Oscar 
Belin, Erik 
Benson, Fred. 
Benson, J. 
Bentzen, Bent 
Berg. H. J. 
Benson, Chas. 
Bergstrom, Paul 
Bergquist, C. 
Berlin, Adolph 
Bertelsen. Alf. 
Berlin, Werner 
Berlin, Nils 
Bernard, S. 

Caen, P. 
Cafferty. John 
Campbell. Martin 
Carlsen, Martin 
CarLsen, C. W. 
Carlsen, John 
Carlson, G. 
Carlson, Chas. 
Carlson, F. 
Carlson, Mr. 
Carlstrom, A. 
Carson, Chas. 
Caspersen, Chris 
Causon, llarry C 
Ceelan, John 
Clialer, Bautista 

Dahler, Peter 
Day, H. E. 
1 Jeans, Taft 
Deegan, John 
Deville, John 
iJiller, Edw. 
Doense, -306 

Edwards, S. 
Eggelhof, Fred. 
Ekendahl, Waino 
Ekstedt, Harry 
Ekstrom, Geo. 
Ekstodt, Harold 
Ekwall, Gust. A. 
Elfstrom, A. 
Ellingsen, F. 
Eliasen, Chas. 
Ellis, W. W. 
Ellison, Chas. 

Fasig, Don 
Fazani, F. 
Feigen, Johan 
Fiiigerling, Ed. 
Fischer, Wilhelm 
Fisher, H. H. 
Fislier. Torsten 
Fjeldstad, Olaf 
Fjelman, Jonas 

Gabrielsen, Elling 
Garvin, F. 
Garciell, Joe 
Georgensen, A. 
Gerdes, August 
Glbbs, H. D. 
Glesen, Billy 
Gilje, S. 
Gilling, John 
Gjardahl, Soren 
Glase, Gust 
Glencross, Henry 
Gonda, Cornelius 
Grabovac, A. 



Anderson, K. O. 
Anderson, Alex. 
Anderson, John, 1514 
Anderson, Christian 
Anderson, Fredrick 
Anderson, Ole 
Anderson, John R., 

-1246 
Anderson, Victor 
Anderson, Martin 
Andresen, Anton 

-lt;35 
Apostolakos, Peter 
Armesen, Isok 
Arnold, Ernest 
Aronsen, Halfdan 
Azinl, Giuseppe 

Billing, Knut 
Bjork, Algot 
Black, Victor 
Blasenhani, Harold 
Bladen. Pete 
Blauert. Wm. 
Blomgren, M. 
Bodahl, Hans O. 
Boe, Carl R. 
Boers, M. 
Bohm, Emil 
Boldt, Chr. 
Bolt. Tony 
Boqvist, Charles 
Borg, Antonio 
Boye, H. H. 
Brannigan, Wm. 
Braun, Johan D. 
Bredesen, Jolian 
Breekke, Hans 
Brelvick, Lars O. 
Broders, Hajo 
Brose, Dick 
Bryning, Wm. 
Brun, Axel -1839 
Burton, Chester 
Burmeister, John 

Christiansen, Fred. 

Christoftersen, Carl 
W. 

Chrlstensen, August 

Christensen, H. P. 

Chrlstensen, Olaf 

Christiansen, L. P. 

Christophersen, 1288 

Clyde, H. R. 

Corty, Caesar 

Cowen, John 

Crangle, Jas. 

Creijg, Enriques 

Cross, Leander D. 

Cunningham, An- 
drew 

Dories, H. 
Dosl, Theo. K. 
Doyle, Wm. 
Durholt, Hugo 
Duval, Bernard 
Duvel, Wilhelm 



Haak, R. 
Haas, Oscar 
Haagensen, M. 
Habsbon, Jas. 
Hafke, Peter 
Hagen, Louis 
Hagglund, Chas. 
Haggblom, Charlie 
Haier, Fred. 
Hakansson, Ingvar 
Hammargren, Oscar 
Hana, O. O. 
Hannus, M. 
Hanssen, Nikolai, 

-1S67 
Hansen, Emil 
Hansen, -1969 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, Nills 
Hansen, Ole D. 
Hansen, Walter 
Hansen, E. A. 
Hansen, Carl -1910 
Hansen, Hans F. 
Hansen, Bemat 
Hansen, Thom 
Hanson, H. C. 
Hansson, Chas. G. 
Hartung, Richard 
Harmonson, K. 
Haugen, Lars 
Haug, H. H. 
Illman, Thom. 
Ingwardsen, K. 



Engdahl, F. 
Engstrom, M. R. 
Ennls. R. 
Eneson, E. R. 
Ericksen, L. H. 
Ericksen, O. -606 
Espersen, Anton 
Ericksen, Erick 
Erickson, Victor 
Erie, Andrew 
Espeland, August 

Folvik, L. C. 
Forde. C. 
Forberg, Alex. 
Foster, Mr. 
Fredericksen, Bill 
Frederikson 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Freiberg, P. 

Graham, L. M. 
Gronman, Karl 
Gronholm, W. 
Groth, John 
Guger, August 
Gundersen, Kristlan 
Gundersen, John 
Gundersen, Andreas, 

-785 
Gusjaas, Oscar 
Gustafsen. Gust. 
Gutman, R. 
Guttenberg, Gus. 

Hartog, John 
Haseth, August 
Heggstrom, H. 
Heggebo, I. 
Hein, M. 
Hein, F. 
Heinig. Johann 
Helenius, Oskar 
Helmros, G. 
Holmes, Gus 
Heltwood, A. S. 
Hengst, Otto 
Henriksson. -2028 
Hermansen, -1622 
Hermansen, Fritz 
Hesketh. H. B. 
Hesse, Emil A. 
Hetman. Walter 
Hofgaard. Hans 
Hogan, Jim 
Hokanson, K. 
Holste, H. 
Holmes, Alex. 
Honor, Charles 
Housman, H. J. 
Housler, Otto 
Hubertz, Emil 
Huishneek, W. 
Hultman, Albin 
Hunt. Thos. 
Humphrey, W. P. 
Hutchison, Alex. 
Iversen, Sigwald B. 



Jackson, John 
Jacobs, G. C. 
Jamieson, J. E. 
Jaussoii, Frederick 
Jensen, R. 
.Icnson. Carl 
.leiisen, P. F. 
Jensen, John 
Jensen, Hans -2014 
Jepson, Nels 
Jefferson, Victor 
Jelman, J. 
Jenkins, Fred. 
Jensen, P. 
Junsen, Hans -2062 
Johnson, Julius 
Jotinson, John 
Johnson, J. M. 
Kaasik, A. 
Kader, Alf. 
Kallas, Aug. 
Kallas, Martin 
Kallasman, Edward 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Karlberg, Karl Alf. 
Karlsson, Oscar, 

-1399 
Karlsson, Karl J. 
Kelly. T. F. 
Kelly, W. E. 
Kernup, Edward 
Kcskula, John 
Kielman, Joe 
Kililnian, Charles 
Kinsay, Wm. 
Klebingat, F. 
King, Harry 
Kittelsen, Lauritz 
Knudsen, Matthias 
Lang, Axel E. 
Larsen, Anders 
Larsen, Klaus L. 
l>;irson, -1550 
Larsen, Charles E. 
Larsen, F. A. 
Larsen, Ingvard 
Larsen, Chr. S. 
Larsen, John -1643 
Larsen, Herman 
Larsen, Klaus 
Larssen, Soren M. 
l..arson, Karl 
Larson, Max 
Latham, T. H. 
Lauritzen, E. J. D. 
I.,auritsen, Hans 
Leeberg, Gustaf 
Leighthoft, Chas. 
Lepsoe, Oscar 
Maatson, Olof 
Madson, Thorolf 
Magnusson, Gust. 
Magnusson, C. G., 

-691 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Magnusson, G. W. 

-1147 
Majuri, -1912 
Mallenin. Chas. 
Marin, Joe 
Martin, Howard 
Martinusen, Olaf 
Martinsen. K. -1721 
Markmann, Heinrich 
Mathson, Mauritz 
Matson, Johannes 
Mattson, William 
Mattson, J. M. 
McCulI, James 
McKenzie, Jas. 

Nedberg, August 
Nelsen, Ed. -1044 
Nelson, Carl W. 
Nelson, A. B. 
Ncssenberg, FrI. 
Nielsen, Wm. 
Nielsen. -1072 
Nielsen, S. -1030 
Nielsen, Kris. F. V. 

C. 
Nioderracher, L. 
O'Neill. Jas. 
ODaly, John 
U'lJeen, Pete 
Olavsen, Christian 
OIniann, P. 
Olsen, A. P. 
Olsen, -1187 
Olsen, H. -478 
Olsen, H. -1159 
Olsen, John A. 
Olsen, Billle 
Olsen, Chas. 
Olsen, O. 
Olsen, Olaf D. 
I'ackham, J. 
I'actlaw. Edw. H. 
I'agel, E. 
Palmer, Joseph 
I'aludan, Chas. 
I'apoijoglon, Con- 

stantinon 
Paul, Peter G. 
I'oarson, N. F. 
Pearson, John S. 
Pearson, S. 
Pearson, O. T. 
I'edersen, Laurits 
Pekman, Ernest 
Pendville, N. 
I'orsson, A. F. 
I'ersson, M. F. 
Perlsen, N. 
Petersen, Harry 
Petersen, Aage 
Petersen, Gert 
Petersen, H. A. R. 
Petersen, Berthel 
Petersen, N. -1235 
Quarnstrom, Alex. 
Ramberg, B. 
Rasmussen, -525 
Rasmusen. -497 
Rasmussen, Peter P. 
Rasmussen, Oscar 
Rasmussen, S. V. 

-980 
Redmond, Mr. 
Reed, W. H. 
Keek, John A. 
Kenf, Nlel 
Renter, Ernest 
Reutern. Axel 
Saar, F. A. 
Saalman, Joseph 
Saftstrom, Niels 
Sahllt. E. 
.Sandberg, N. A. 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Sander, Robert 
Sanderfeid, Fred 
Saul. Th. 
Scliall. Carl 
Schnell, Heinrich 
Schroder, Paul 
Schevig, Anton B. 
Schluter, Paul 
Schmidt. Hans 
Scheel, Carl 



Johansen, Chas. 
Joliansen, Niels 
Johanson, -1677 
Johansson, -1856 
Johansson, John 
Joliansson, E. K. 
Jolinson, Axel 
Johnson, Bernard 
Jolmson, C. A. 
Johnson, G. Alb. 
Johnsson, Herman 
Jordt, Peter -1737 
Jordfald, Th. 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Jorgensen, H. P. 

-1498 
Joseph, Ambrose 

Kohne, Ernest 
Konkila, Johan 
Kopperstad, O. 
Kopatz, Chas. 
Kihiman, Gunnar 
Kilkeny, M. F. 
KJarsgaard, Hans 
Krane, Anton 
Kraul, John 
Kralvik, O. 
Kreft, Paul 
Kristensen, Marius, 

-1088 
Krlstiansen, K. S. 
Krlstansen, -1355 
Krotchin, H. 
Kuhlman, Wm. 
Kuniel, K. 
Kumlander, E. 
Kupper, Alfred 
Kylander, Herman 
Lersten, J. O. 
Lewald, H. 
Lewenson, John 
Lind, Chas. 
Lind, W. 
Lindholm, E. A. 
Lindroth, E. 
Lindgren, Clias. 
Linder, Chas. 
Litalien, Gust. 
Ljungberg, Herman 
Long, Robert 
Loughlin, M. J. 
Luckman, E. 
Lude, Thorwald 
Ludvigsen, A. -1249 
Luhrs, L. -1179 
Lund, P. 
Lundstrom, T. 
Lutter, Tlieodore 
McKenzie, Duncan 
McKenna, Barny 
Mehrtens, Herman 
Meidell, John 
Mersman, L. 
Meskell, Mat. 
Meyer, Otto 
Meyer, Erwln 
Meyer, F. C. 
Mikklesen, Alf. 
Miller, Walt. 
Misterman, Paul 
Moe, John 
Moller, Nels 
Moller, Hans 
Mond, Mr. 
Moore, Wm. 
Morse, Harry W. 
Muir, F. W. D. 
Muller, John 
Munk, Chas. 



Nilsen, 

Nilsen, 

Nilsen, 

Nilson. 

Nilson, 

Nilsson, 

Nolan 

Nordlof 

Norris, 

Norris, 



Hendrik 

Ingvald 

Alfonse 

N. 

Albt. 

C. M. 
Jolin 

Sigurd 
Edward 
N. A. 



Olsen, O. S. -1123 
Olsen, O. E. -991 
Olsen, S. -1119 
Olson, Blrger 
Olson, G. B. 
Olson, G. F. -562 
Olson, Hans 
Olson, O. H. 
Olsson, Carl G. -HOI 
Opperman, Wm. 
Usell, Teddy 
Osterman, Oscar 
Ozard, Wm. 

Petersen, Oscar 
Petersen, C. L. 
Petersen, Meier 
Pettersen, S. A. 
Peterson, Johan 
Peterson, S. 
Peterson, J. -1138 
Peterson, L. 
Peterson, Victor 
Petterson, H. A. 
-1154 

Peterson, W. A. 
Peterson, Otto 
Petterson, Victor 

-1447 
Phillips, Max 
Phillips, Geo. 
Pierce, Jno. 
Pietschman, Geo. 
Pletite, Th. 
Pihpick, Ch. 
Pommer, John 
Priede, Wm. 

Quinn, Wm. 
Rignell, J. 
Roaldson, F. E. 
Robsham, W. 
Roose, Otto 
Rost, Chas. 
Rosenwold, I. 
Reinhold, Arvid 
Reinhold, Ernst 
Rosenthal, J. 
Rustamus, Julius 
Ryerson, Geo. 
Rytko, Otto 

Skoglund, Henry 
Smith, Johan 
Smith, Max 
Sommer, J. 
Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Soler, Emanuel 
Sorger, G. M. E. 
Sorensen, N. M. 
Soto, Santos 
Stangeland, P. 
Starr, T. 
Steen, Hllmar 
Stenlund, John 
Stenberg, Erik 
Stettenberg, Einar 
Stimsen, Harold 



' Sihuster, Jacob 
I Schultman, John 

Scott, Emil G. 
, Selin. -1565 
■ Sexon, Chas. 

Sjogren, John 

Sjolund, Henry. 

SJostrom, Gus. 

Teras, John 

Tei-vakalllo, G. A. 

Theorin. J. E. 

Thingberg, Oscar 

Thomasson, Andee 

Thompsen, Peter 

Thorsen, Arthur 

Thomas, Henry 

Ulappa, K. 

Ulbrand, Wm. 

Ulm, Gustave 

Valentine, Geo. 

Valens, John 

Van Poelyen, P. 

Venema, Harry 

Wagner, W. -1071 

Wagner, H. 

Walsh, Michael J. 

Walters, A. B. 

Wanack, M. 

Wash, Henry 

Waterloo, T. 

Waunquist, E. 

Waurisch, Richard 

Welin, Herman 

Welure, J. 

Westman. A. 

Wesch, Henry 

Wesic, Gustav 

Young, Peter 

Zimmerling, F. 

Zillig, Albert 



Sullivan, Jerry L. 
Svane, A. 
Svanson, Chas. 
Svanson, S. G. 
Svenson, Peder -2209 
Svensson, L. G. 
Swanson, Ovel 

Thomson, GL E. 
Tillman, Chas. 
Tompson, Gunvald 
Topel, Fred. 
Trentani, Louis 
Tscheekar, F. 
Tuveson, John 

Uppit, W. 
Ursin, Jno. 

Vireck, A. H. F. 
Vis, Jacob 
Voightlander, Felix 

Wiberg, John 
Wikstrom, Emil 
Willander, Oscar 
Wlliberg, Karl 
Willman, -1020 
Wills, George 
Willartz. Fred 
Wilson, A. B. 
Wilhelmson, S. 
Wold, Olaf 
Wold, S. 
VA^ucst, Walter 
Wug, Frank G. -1241 
Wunstorf, Aug. 
Ysamgeio, Za. 
Ziepke, Fritz 
Zoe, Frank 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sallora' Union 
of the Pacific. 
Aaga, Johan 
Bafsieux, M. 
Balda, Alfonso 
Dyrness, L. E. 
Eliason, C. 
Kspersen. Anton 
Faslg, Dan 
Gustafson, K. O. 
Hannus, Alex. 
Hartmere, C. -1245 
Hogan, L. 
Johnson, John U. 

-2161 



Johansen, John 
McPherson, Peter 
Nilsen, Christ 
Sjoblom, Carl 
Seiren. Alfred -2443 
Seversen, Ch. 
Thoresen, Theodor 
Thilo, Peter 
Winblad, M. 
Wll-son, John C. -642 
Wahl, Robert 
Welure, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, A. Lehtonen, John 

Almeida, J. C. Lindroth, -1189 

Aalto, Aimo Lindgaad, John 

Aken, Emil Lundberg, John 

Aleksandersen, Halv Llndroos, A. W. 
Andersen. -1119 Lorentzen, Ernst 

Andersen. Emil Lund, P. 

Andersen, Andrew Lundberg, H. 
.\ndersen, Olaf -1118 Lundberg. C. 
Anderson. Chas. Larsen, Andrew 



Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Svend 

Hugo 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, G. A. S. 
.Anderson, Frank 
Ando. J. G. 
Rastian, Wm. 
Baxter, W. J. 
Beni)it, Dewail 
Benson, Charles 
Bergland. A. 
Bianca, F. 
Rohm, August 



Levander, Ernest 
Laas, J. 
Muller 

Maibohm, Hans 
Moris, Ocon R. 
Miller, F. W. 
Muller. R. 
Mattlson, J. M. 
Mesketh, Robert 
Molher, S. D. 
Morse, H. W. 
Mehent. T. 
Nass, F. M. 
Nelson, Jack 



I Bodahl. Hans -1746 Nilson, H. 



Olson, Waldemar 
Olsson. Ernest -966 
Opperman, Wm. 



Buye, Anton 
Callow, A. W. 
Christensen, Hans 

rhresthensen, Harry O'Neill, Frank J. 
I>avis, J. Olsen, Olaf T. 

Ericksen. A. Paul, Peter 

Fardig, Wm. Pista, J. 

Flother. James G. Pettersson, -1065 
Gunderson, Andreas Petersen, -1093 
Gunderson. Kristlan Perdtes, John 



G '4 raff. Otto 
Gilbert. A. 
Hansen, O. 
Hansen. J. T. 
Hansen, Jack 
Hanssen, Ernest • 
TTanson, Henry 
Haraldson, Jofin 
Haraldson, -874 
Henlg. .T. 
Heyke, F. 
Heyhe, A. 
Hvid, Hans 
Holm, Carl 
Hooley, Alex 
Hubner, H. 
Hardlof, Sigurd 
Helander, J. E. 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, Andreas 
Hoseth, Kristlan 
Jansson, Louis 



Petersen, Frank A. 
Price, Thurman 
Rasehtun, Franz 
Rasmuss, Peter 
Reitter, F. 
Rentern, Axel 
Rossheck, Gust 
Rustanius, John 
Rasmussen, N. C. 
Rasmussen. S. -12S 
Sanselber, Paul 
Samuelsen. Ingwald 
Schnider, Henrich 
Svedstrup, E. 1>. 
Smith, J. S. 
Svedstrup. E. F. 
Skattel, A. 
Seidel. Willy 
Sindahl, Jens 
Stange, Fritz 
Svendsen, B. 
Svenson, Bernard 



Jenson, John Frank Syvertsen, H. 
Johnsson, C. A. Summers, James 



John.sson, A. -1874 
Johnson, Chas. 
Johansen, Fritz 
Johanson, Carsten 
John, Robert 
Johnson, P. T. 
Julian, A. B. 
.facobsen, Peder J. 
Johanson. Andrew 
.Johanson, E. A. 
Karlsson, A. M. 
KJelman, Joe 
KJarsgaard. Hans 
Klabee, Kawe 
Klobu, Kave 
Kolkln. F. 
ICrauzer. Otto 
Klahn, K. 
Kumlander, Emil 



Swanson, Carl 
Thomas, Henry 
Thomas, F. S. 
Thorsen, Chas. 
Tillman, Chas. 
Uldall, Hans 
Woldhouse, John 
Weehauf, Henry 
Wlljanen, W. V. 
Wuest, Walter 
Zorner, Chas. 
Zebrowski, P. 

PACKAGES 
Berge, John 
Hansen, John 
Julius, P. 
Tjehtinen, Kaarlo 
Pedersen, Peder 
Polison, Tom 



Laehman. Theodore Svendson, Edelmond 
Laine. A. W. Uggla, Fred. 

I^arson, Christ. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ellis Owen Pritchard, last heard 
from on the Pacific Coast four years 
ago, is inquired for by his sister. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
communicate with the Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and IVIarkets $ts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

.Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 






The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (THE GERMAN BANK) Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $ 1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund 113,473.47 

Deposits June 30th, 1911 44,567,705.83 

Total Assets 47,173,498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post 
Office, or Express Co.'s. Money Orders, 
or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings . from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; 
First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; Sec- 
ond Vice-President and Manager, George 
Tourny; Third Vice-President, J. W. Van 
Bergen; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secre- 
taries, G. J. O. Folte and Wm. D. New- 
house; Goodfellow, Eells & Orrick, Gen- 
6r£Ll A ttorncvs. 

BOARD of' DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, 
Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, .1. W. Van 
Bergen, Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, F. 
Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission Street, 
between 21st and 22nd Streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 
Clement Street, between 5th and 6th Ave- 
nues. For receipt and payment of De- 
posits only. W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to J2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Wat«r In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light roams. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. Office open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 

Near Third Street 

100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 

Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below Bth, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 19M; Home J-19«« 



f> 



SONNER AV NORGE" 

,,Henrlk Ibsen" Loge No. 7 
San Francisco 
Moter hver Fredagaften Kl 8, I Vet- 
erans' Hall, 431 Duboce Ave. 

Medlemskontingent $1: per Maaned: 
Sykebidrag $10: per Uke. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Union Label 
Goods 

This store is headquarters for Men's 

furnishing goods bearing the UNION 

LABEL. 

Shirts with the UNION LABEL. 

Collars with the UNION LABEL. 

Neckties with the UNION LABEL. 

Suspenders with the UNION LABEL. 



lohnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite 5th 



^^^•^^v^^^^^^^^^^^v^^^^vwvv^wvw^^^vs^ 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 

Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Bensen, S. 
Christensen, Ole 

Martin 
Christensen, Harvy 
Farrell, Henry D. 
Frick, John 
Grant, John 
Grosfetti, J. 
Hansen, Hans F. 

-1746 
Hansen, J. P. 
Ivars, Carl 
Jacobson, W. 
Johansen, Arthur 
Johnston, R. 
Kolkin, Fred 
Krohn, John 



Langvid, Ernest 
Lundquist, Alex. 
Menz, Paul E. 
Nelsen, Nels 
Olsen, C. 
Oterdahl, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
Pedersen, Peter 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Petteson, Oscar 
Plottner, W. 
Rasmusen, Karl 
Rowke, Fred. 
Schivig, B. 
Wachmann, Hans 
Wallen, L. 
Wilson, John 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



DIAMONDS - - WATCHES - - JEWELRY 

ON CREDIT 



763 

MARKET ST. 

Upstairs 




San 

Francisco, 

Cal. 



Send for Handsomely Illustrated Catalogue— FREE 



C. BREINING Special Marine District Representative 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



^^^^^^^k^^^^^W^W^'W*^S/N/S/V>^VVtfV^'^">^V>^ 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLOTHIER AND FURNISHER 
FOR GENTLEMEN 

Up-to-Date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 
Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION HADE 

RED^SEflL CIGAR CO., MANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



^S^^^^^^A^A^^/^^A/WWW^^/^'V^^N^V^'S^^V* 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the address of 
Thos. Symington, age 59, last heard 
from in Seattle, Wash., 1908, will 
please communicate with John Sym- 
ington, 674 West Madison street, 
Chicago, 111. 

Information wanted of the where- 
abouts either of the parents or next of 
kin of Oscar Wilhelm Fredericksen. 
Fredericksen was born in Norway in 
1884; he was about five feet five inches 
tall; from light to medium build, blue 
eyes and blonde hair; had been on 
Pacific Coast of United States since 
1905; was a sailor. Write to F. R. 
Wall, Merchants' Exchange, San Fran- 
cisco, California, United States of 
America. Norwegian papers please 
copy. 

The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
]51(lg.. San Francisco, Cal., seeks in- 
formation concerning a Danish sailor, 
Mr. Poul Cliristian Hansen, called 
Foul Hansen, born in Copenhagen, 
I^enmark, January 28, 1870. His 
mother in Copenhagen has not heard 
from him since February, 1902, when 
he sent a letter from San Francisco 
to her. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Su. A. 
Anderson, V. 
Anderson, E. Alfred 
Barnard, C. 
Buckland, W. 
Buwmelster, I. 
Carlson, M. 
Carl.son, Conrad -551 
Collins. E. F. 
Ojnrad. Fritz 
Driscoll, I. 
Dublin. Gustaf 
Fors, Alfred 
Goude, C. 
('■rove, Albert 
Gustaf son, Johan 
Gustafson. Axel 
Hanson, H. I. 
Haltonson, Ingvar 



Hegan, Patrick 
Holten, Pete 
Jacobson, Erland 
Johanson, H. J. 
Karlson, N. 
I^arson, Louis 
Lovik, Aron N. 
Lundbech, M. S. 
Marvin, Joseph D. 
Mitteineyer, J. F. 
Nielsen, Wilhelm 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Nielsen, Chr. 
Nielsen, Niels -751 
Schelenz, Karl 
Smith. Max 
Sovlg, Martin 
Stensland. I'aul 
Weback, S. 




The McNamara brothers will be 
tried separately, John J. being prob- 
ably heard first. The trial begins on 
Octolier 11. 

A decision by the United States 
Supreme Court on the constitutional- 
ity of the Employers' Liability law of 
1908 is expected on October 16. 

The labor movement of California 
has indorsed the proposed Constitu- 
tional amendments for the Initiative 
and Referendum, Recall, Workmen's 
Compensation and Woman Suffrage. 

Refusing to longer work on lumber 
belonging to the Sunset Lumber 
Company, now a non-union concern, 
sixty-five members of the Millmen's 
Union No. 550, went on strike at 
Oakland, Cal., on October 6. 

Two hundred and eighty tailors, 
employed by six- of the largest firms 
in Los Angeles, struck on October 6. 
The men want an eight-hour day, 
more pay and better working condi- 
tions. 

The convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor, at Bakers- 
field last week, decided to aid in rais- 
ing funds for the defense of the Mc- 
Namaras; also to support the striking 
railroad shopmen. 

A municipal boarding house for 
working girls is projected by the 
town council of Rixdorf, one of the 
boroughs of Greater Berlin, which 
stands in the same relation to Berlin 
as West Ham to London. 

A threatened trouble between the 
master butchers and the slaughtermen 
at Fremantle, W. A., was recently set- 
tled by the employers conceding the 
men's demands, rather than put the 
public to any inconvenience. 

The strike on the Irish railroads 
which began on September 21 was 
settled on October 4. The strikers 
abandoned their original grievance, 
which was the objection to handling 
lumber shipped by a non-union firm. 

The Burnside .shops of the Illinois 
Central Railroad became "open shops" 
on October 4, a formal notice posted 
within the stockade informing the 
workmen that hereafter the road will 
deal with its employes as individuals. 

With all preliminaries settled, the 
commission ready to do business and 
the law held constitutional by the 
State Supreme Court, Washington's 
new Workmen's Compensation law 
went into effect on October 1. 

Contract prison labor is a thing of 
the past in Oregon. Governor West 
on October 2 annulled the contract 
which for many years has been in 
effect, granting to a stove works the 
right to use prison labor in the con- 
struction of stoves. The manufacture 
of bricks has also been stopped. 

The twelfth annual convention of 
the California State Federation of 
Labor opened at Bakersfield on Octo- 
ber 2. Reports showed a material in- 
crease in membership during the year. 
President D. D. Sullivan and Secre- 
tary-Treasurer Scharrenberg were re- 
elected, as were most of tiic other of- 
ficials. 

Casting aside ail "scientific" sys- 
tems of Navy Yard management be- 
cause he believes they involved too 
much detail and require serious 
changes in the Civil Service rules, 
.Secretary of the Navy Meyer will in- 
augurate the system used by Vickers 
Limited at the Barrow-in-Furness 
works. This was officially announced 
on October 8. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



A New Use. — Little Brother — 
Where's my fishin' pole gone to? 

Bigger Brother — Sister's usin' it for 
a hatpin. — Puck. 



No Experience. — Gibbs — How are 
lobsters caught? 

Bibbs — Don't ask mc. I'm no 
chorus girl. — Boston Transcript. 



How Fido Lost Out. — "My girl 
used to think a lot of her pug dog, 
but I've managed to get the edge on 
him since we married." 

"How did you work it?" 

"Fido wouldn't eat her cooking, 
and I did." — New York Mail. 



.'Mliterations! — "Joined in June," is 
the way a Southern newspaper heads 
a wedding report. This suggests a 
few other alliterations, as "Fastened 
in February," "Mated in May," "At- 
tached in August," "Spliced in Sep- 
tember" and "Divorced in December." 
— Boston Transcript. 



Forced To It. — "Did you ask 
father if you might have me?" 

"Yes, darling." 

"What did he say?" 

"He said he would rather see you 
borne to your grave." 

"Oh, pshaw! Then we'll have to 
take it up with mother personally." — 
Chicago Record-Herald. 



The Music! — He — Do you approve 
of dancing? 

She— No. 

He— Why not? 

She — Why, it's mere hugging set to 
music. 

He — Well, what is there about that 
you don't like? 

She — The music. — Tit-Bits. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTKWOHTHY SCHOOL 

Is under tlie direct and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 

with all modern appliances to illustrate and 

teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a knowl- 
edge of Navigation, and Navigation only. 
Conditions have changed, and the American 
seamen demand a man as a teacher with 
higher attainments than one who has only 
the limited ability of a seaman. The Prin- 
cipal of this School, keeping this always in 
view, studied several years the Maritime 
Law. and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of Navigation and its 
kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, for 
no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be. even In the rudiments of common 
education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the depths of 
Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a comparatively 
short Interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nautical 
Publications, Hydrographlc and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



Not the Same. — A child of strict 
parents, whose greatest joy had hith- 
erto been the weekly prayer meeting, 
was taken by its nurse to the circus 
for the first time. When he came 
home he exclaimed: 

"Oh, mamma, if you went once to 
the circus you'd never, never go to 
prayer meeting again in all your life." 
—Tit-Bits. 



^^^^^^^•*^^^^^^^s^^^^^^'^^^^v^"^^%^v%^v^^r*^^^ 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from everyone — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



ANNOVNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY 

J. COHEN & CO. 
Baltimore ClotHin^ Store 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 
have installed a Tailoring Department in their store and are now making 

Suits to Order 

Union Label, Union Tailors 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 

Eyes Examined Fr ee Repairing Our Specialty 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 

the Lowest Prices 

JamtsJt.Sorensen ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 

■ J^tt and arm. YEARS 




Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 

Sl^^^IsM"! Sjl iiAiitl MnH ol tSi t-^ bB 

||TD6Amwinaits,^g!!|K.iiimiiAiiONAL 1 UIVIOIV 




The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



r0Ss«"";r04D 



OVERALLS 

DEMAND THE BRAND 



Neusiadter Bros. 

iANFRANCI'iCO NLW YORK PORTLAND 



United States Nautical College 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD. F. R. G. S., Principal 

Member of California Teachers' Association. 

Candidates prepared in the shortest possible time for Masters, Mates, 

Pilots and Wireless Operators. 

Government Examinations. 

The Hitchfield system is the easiest and most modern in all branches. 

Do yourself the justice to investigate. 

320 Market Street, San Francisco. Phone Kearny 4686 



Get a New Stove 
on Hale's Club Plan 

$2.00 Down 
$1.00. $1.50 or $2.00 

a Week, According to the Price 
of the Stove You Select 




This stove is a regular $27.00 
"Quick Meal" gas stove offered at 
$2 1 .00, with the privilege of club 
terms. 




Market and Sixth St*. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 



719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St 



C BREINING 

Representing Marine Diitrict 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boon and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Aut- 
tlts a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Uo 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



CJBfiBusrtu 

OVERALLS 8. PANTS 



UNION MADE 




TS! 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



VOL. XXV. No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 18. 1911 



Our Motto: Juidce by Organization. 



Whole No. 2 142. 



LAKE STEAMERS UNDERMANNED. 



In tlie interest of jjublic safety the Chicas'o 
Federation of Labor recently undertook an 
investigation of the passenger steamers sail- 
ing out of the port of Chicago. The com- 
mittee selected to conduct tlie investigation 
lias completed its work and has submitted 
the following cf)mplete and interesting re- 
])ort : 

System of Manning. 

We have examined into the conditions ex- 
isting on twenty-four passenger steamers 
sailing out of Chicago, including boats in 
each of the various passenger steamship 
companies. The crews on these steamers 
are made up as follows : 

1. One master or captain, and two li- 
censed mates. 

2. Three to six experienced seamen called 
quartermasters, or wheelsmen, watchmen 
(not "cabin watchmen"), and lookoutsmen. 

3. Usually from 2 to 8 '"scrubbers." 
These men or boys arc not sailors, are not 
required to have any experience; the only 
qualification needed to secure employment 
in these positions is a willingness to handle 
a scrub brush. 

4. Four to 30 deckhands. No experience 
of any kind is needed to obtain emi)loyment 
in these positions. In most cases the deck- 
hands arc merely freight-handlers. Note 
further explanation regarding these men. 

5. Engine department crew, consisting 
usuallv of 2 licensed engineers, 2 oilers and 
from 2 to 4 firemen. 

6. Steward's department, consisting of 
from 6 to 125 persons, none of whom are 
sailors. This department consists of cooks 
and helpers, pantry boys, waiters, porters, 
bellboys, cabin watchmen, chambermaids, 
bartenders, news and cigar stand attendants, 
etc. 

We find that the average crew of experi- 
enced seamen on each steamer, exclusive of 
the captain and two mates, is five. These 
five seamen are the two quartermasters or 
wheelsmen, two watchmen on most of the 
steamers fl8 steamers out of the 24 have 
two watchmen, 4 steamers have one such 
man, and 2 have none. It must be remem- 



l)ered that the watchmen here referred to are 
not the "cabin watchmen," these latter not 
being sailors) and one or two lookoutsmen 
dl steamers out of the 24 have two look- 
outs, 12 steamers have one, while 1 steamer 
uses deckhands for this purpose). 
Only One Man On Deck. 

( )n a passenger steamer employing 2 quar- 
termasters, 2 watchmen and 2 lookoutsmen, 
a total of 6 experienced seamen, the watch 
on deck consists of one man of each grade, 
a total of three such experienced seamen 
( )ne of these, the quartermaster, is at the 
wheel in the pilot house or on the steamer's 
bridge, steering the ship, and is not available 
for any other work. The watchman is sta- 
tioned on the freight deck and would only 
know of anything dangerous on the passen- 
ger decks through hearing the ofificial signal 
or alarm. The lookoutsman is usually sta- 
tioned at the extreme forward end of the 
steamer, and he is the only available man 
to whom the officer in charge of the vessel 
could personally connnunicate a sudden di- 
rect order to perform emergency service on 
deck. In cases where only one lookoutsman 
is emi)loycd, who then stands watch only at 
night, the officer in charge must, during the 
(lav, wait until the watchman comes to him 
from the freight deck in response to a sig- 
nal. The law itself permits this condition 
of alTairs. 

It will be noticed from the above that not 
one of the 24 passenger steamers ever has 
on watch at one time sufficient experienced 
seamen to latmch and man even one lifeboat. 
.\o experienced seamen could be found on 
the passenger decks, except, at times, a 
lookoutsman stationed in the bow of the 
ship. 

Such few experienced sailors as are cm- 
ployed on board these steamers are each 
])laced in charge of a lifeboat, with cooks, 
waiters, bellboys, deckhands or freight- 
handlers as crews, and there are not even 
enough able seamen on board these steamers 
to place even one such man in each lifeboat. 

For instance : Lifeboat .\o. 1 on a certain 
steamer, with the Isl male in charge, has for 



its crew 2 cabin boys and 2 deckhands; ihe 
"cabin boys" mentioned being bellboys. 
Lifeboat No. 4 of the same steamer has a 
lookoutsman in charge, with a crew of 2 
deckhands, a porter and a waiter. Lifeboat 
-No. 6 on the same vessel is in charge of the 
steward, with a crew consisting of a cook, 
a porter, a pantryman and a waiter. 
Boat Drill Useless. 

In the judgment of }'Our committee, after 
conference with a number of persons famil- 
iar with such matters, compliance with the 
law in the matter of boat and fire drill on 
these steamers means little. The so-called 
"Fire Drill" and "Boat Drill" is held once 
each week. The I'ire I^rill consists of pull- 
ing down the hose and opening a valve. The 
calling of the Fire Drill serves as a notice 
for Boat Drill. l'>oat Drill consists of lifting 
from one to three lifeboats and swinging 
them out. Tl is not required that lifeboats 
be launched into the water with crews in 
place during I>oat Drill, — and without this 
being done the drill is very nearly useless. 
The men are given no practice whatever in 
handling lifeboats in the water. We found 
a few men who had heard of cases where 
one or two of the boats have actually been 
manned and lowered into the water during 
lloat Drill, but such cases are clearly the ex- 
ce|)tioii. and usually take place when the 
Government Inspectors are present. Certain 
it is that the crews are not given sufficient 
practical training in the handling of life 
saving apparatus. 

We found no deckhands who even claimed 
lo be sailors. In most of the passenger 
steamers these men are sim])ly freight-han- 
dlers who are carried from port to port by 
the steamer to load and unload cargo. They 
do not stand any watch whde the vessel is 
out of ])ort, that being the time they sleep. 
They are of the type commonly called 
"tramps," seldom work more than a few 
days on a vessel at one time. Their work- 
ing hours are long, wages low, accommoda- 
tions and food bad. Their meals, such as 
ihey arc, are served to them on Ihe freight 
(Contiinicrl on Paji^c 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



"SHANTY" BILL'S DOPE. 



llo! all you lads who cam your scads upon the 
briny main; 
Steer clear, I say, of skirt-rigged craft, lest, 
mates, they tow you under. 
I"or when they do you'll live to rue it o'er and 
o'er again 
.\s sure as ships and petticoats were meant to 
keep asunder. 
— (From "Poems of Punk," by Hawserlaid Bill.) 

"Shanty" Rill was going around the decks 
like one burdened with a grouch and vainly 
looking for some place in which to bury it. 
Ever since we left Boston he had been 
growling and nnimbling and swearing to 
himself, occasionally throwing out dark 
hints and vague warnings apropos of noth- 
ing in particular as it seemed to us, sagely 
wagging his head and muttering, "You just 
wait an' see," when pinned down on the 
subject by some one. However, as most old 
sailors are peculiar in that respect, not much 
attention was paid to his antics. 

For that matter we were kept too busy 
the first ten days of the voyage with short- 
ening or making sail, wearing ship about 
twice a watch, and jogging away at the 
I)umi)s between spells, to have much time 
loft for idle speculations. What little watch 
hc-Iow we did get was barely sufficient to 
keep us from going dippy for the want of 
sleep. It beats the devil how a fellow can 
sleep in bad weather at sea, turned in "all 
standing" with oilskins and seaboots on 
and steaming like a hot frankfurter on a 
frosty day from the heat of the body drying 
the wet duds. Yep, that's the way we used 
to "stand by for a call" in the good old wind- 
jammers whenever "Kid" Boreas or "Bat- 
tling" Cyclone took it into their heads to 
kick up a fuss with Old Briny. 

There was one thing, though, which gave 
us no little concern when we had the time 
to worry over it. A part of the cargo con- 
sisted of fifteen tons of dynamite consigned 
to the Chilean Government, we being bound 
for Valparaiso. On the second day of the 
gale something broke adrift down in the 
hold and kept bumping around with a nerve- 
racking noise at every roll or pitch she made. 
It was out of the question to do anything 
about it while the seas swept over her as 
over a half-tide rock; so there we were, 
Ijaddling around in the icy water and 
shantying at the pumps, dully conscious 
that any moment we might be blown sky- 
higii. .And the more that infernal bumping 
in the hold kept on, the more luridly un- 
canny grew the mutterings of "Shanty" 
Bill. 

As a pleasant ofifsct to it all we occa- 
sionally caught a glimpse of a fair young 
face framed with heavy masses of dark, 
wavy hair, and lit up by a pair of roguish- 
looking black eyes, shyly peeping at us 
tlirough the parted curtains of one of the 
cabin windows. Which glimpses nearly 
always inspired "Cockney" Bob to troll, 
sotto voce : 

".All in the Downs the fleet lay moored, 
Their streamers waving in the wind; 
When black-eyed Susan came on board, 
Sayin', "Where can I my true love find?" 

From which circumstance it came to pass 
that Miss Susan Gale — twig the name, if you 
])lease — forthwith and^ thenceforth became 
"I Hack-eyed Susan" whenever reference to 
her was deemed necessary by the boys — 
which was tolerably often, you bet. Lovely 
woman is never so lovely to homely man as 
when there is only one of her kind around. 

Miss Gale was accompanying her father, 
a civil engineer, who had undertaken the 
vovage partly for his health, but mainly to 



fulfill a contract with the Chilean Govern- 
ment. .\nd. I may add in passing, had it not 
been that the young lady under discussion 
lived strictly up to the traditional standard 
connoted by her sobriquet, plus the alleged 
fact that there's a sweet little cherub who 
sits up aloft somewhere and watches o'er the 
destiny of Poor Jack, this story would in all 
probability never have been written. 

"Battling" Cyclone and Old Briny finally 
l)atched up a truce, so that once again we 
enjoyed the unwonted pleasures of dry 
decks, a clear sky, and a fair wind. A couple 
of full watches below soon put us all in a 
mental trim to take an interest in the pass- 
ing show, from "Tommy," the ship's cat, 
sharpening his claws on the weather braces, 
to "Black-eyed Susan," coquettishly lolling 
in a rocking-chair on the poop and casting 
but thinly veiled "goo-goo eyes" at "Na- 
than," the second mate. The which was the 
undoing of poor "Nathan," as the sequel will 
show. 

A tall, thin, skinny young man, habitually 
open-mouthed, with a freckled face and 
vacuous expression, was "Nathan." His type 
may be seen of evenings sitting around on 
up-ended cracker barrels in Dowm East 
country stores, squirting tobacco juice on 
the floor, and drawlingly discussing the 
crops, the herring fishing, or the sheriff's 
"steenth and latest raid on "widder" Jones' 
"blind pig." But everything wearing 
trousers is legitimate prey to a vivacious 
young woman off on a vacation, like Miss 
Gale ; and, as the skipper and mate were 
both married men and well on the wrong 
side of fift}', there was obviously nothing 
else for her to do than flirt with "Nathan." 

One evening in the second dog-watch, 
shortly after we had gotten into the North- 
east Trades, I was walking back and forth 
along the weather side of the main deck, my 
senses reveling in the subtle charms of the 
soft moonlight and the gentle sough of the 
breeze straining through the maze of cordage 
and canvas overhead, when "Shanty" Bill 
buttonholed me at the for'ard end of the lap, 
and said : 

"What d'ye think o" that there gell aft 
there?" jerking his thumb to where the 
silvery laugh of Miss Gale could be heard 
commingling with the swash of the swirling 
water under the ship's counter. 

I assured him that I thought well enough 
of her to marry her at five minutes" notice if 
given the chance. 

"Huh," he snorted, contemptuously, 
"that's just like all you young fellers; allers 
losin' yer heads over some purty skirt or 
other. Now, I likes women as well's the 
next man, but I'll be jigarigged an' dee- 
dashed if I wants to see 'em on board of a 
shij). "Tain't no fit place for 'em, any more'n 
a farm is fit for a sailorman. I'd as lief 
travel aroun' with Old Nick as go shipmates 
with a petticoat. They allers bring bad luck 
with 'em, as sure's the Flyin' Dutchman 
brings bad weather. I never seen it fail 
yet. Look at the way that there gell aft 
there is carryin' on with that there poor loon 
of a secon' mate, makin' him loonier than 
ever. I tell yez straight, mate, that if I'd me 
way I'd have 'em makin' a law in Washing- 
ton barrin' all women from goin' to sea. Let 
'em stay ashore where they belong, I say, 
an' not go gallivantin' aroun' on the high 
seas bringin' bad luck to poor sailormen 
what ain't never done 'em no harm. An' 
take m}' tip for it, sonny ; if we gets to Val- 
paraiso without something happening I'll eat 
my hat. You just wait an' see." 



Having delivered himself of which oracular 
bit of misogynous philosophy. Bill calmly relit 
his pipe, only to have to ])ut it away ha.stily 
and run aft in response to the second mate's 
bawled order, "Heave the log." 

Of course, I paid but scant heed to Bill's 
out-pouring, the more so as Miss Gale looked 
anything but a "picter o' bad luck." Be- 
sides, "crabbed age and youth" seldoin share 
the same viewpoint. .And yet, we quote ap- 
provingl}' that 

"The sunset of life gives my.sterious lore. 

And coming events cast their shadows before." 

.\nyway, the very next day "Shanty" Bill 
seemed to have his inning. In the afternoon 
watch "Cockney" Bob and "Yank" Evans, a 
little New York chap, were at work seizing 
off the lanyards of the lee main rigging, 
which had just been set up. After a while 
the two got into a squabble over the re- 
spective merits of London and New York as 
l)leasure haunts of "homeward-bounders," 
during which Evans made a disparaging re- 
mark about Queen Victoria. In a trice they 
had jumped off the rail on to the deck and 
were squaring off at each other in true 
Marquis of Queensberry fashion. 

.A slight outcry from Mi»s Gale, who was 
sitting on the poop talking to the second 
mate, made them pause for a moment. This 
was "Nathan's" opportunity, and he seized 
on it with a degree of willingness deserving 
of better fortune. With that near-pathetic 
fatuity of the average young man, which 
makes him want to "show oft"' like a hero 
in the presence of his best girl, he rushed 
down on the main deck to where "Yank" 
and "Cockney" were making ferocious passes 
at each other, and shouted : 

"Here, none o' that. G'wan about your 
work agin, an' don't let me catch youse 
fightin' any more or there'll be trouble on 
board. I'll do all the fightin' that's to be 
done on this here ship. Git up there, now," 
waving his hand toward the sheerpole where 
the abandoned tarpots and ball of marline 
were swinging about in the breeze. 

The two men dropped their hands and 
looked at the second mate in astonishment. 
Then "Yank" Evans, recovering himself 
somewhat, and sizing "Nathan" up and 
down much the same as the small boy at the 
circus does the giraffe, blurted out, fiercely : 

"You'll do all the fightin' that's to be 
done on this ship, eh? Git t'ell out o' this, 
you blankety blanked bloody big stiff or I'll 
go through youse like a dose o' salts." 

What could poor "Nathan" do? There 
was Miss Susan looking at him and, no 
doubt, expecting him to acquit himself like 
tlic hero which his pose suggested. Clearlj' 
it was up to him to make good in some way 
his im])!ied threat. Putting on a ferocious 
ex|)rcssion he made a wild swipe at Evans, 
missing him by more than a foot. 

The ne.xt instant Evans was slugging 
away at him like a champion out for blood, 
circling around "Nathan" with the ease of a 
cooper going around a cask. Biff! bang! 
went his fists against the ever-open face of 
his tall opponent, until the latter fairly 
sagged at the knees from the fierce on- 
slaught. When at last they pulled Evans 
off him the poor second mate looked like a 
"white hope" after Sam Langford or Jim 
Flynn gets through with him. 

"What did I tell youse?" said "Shanty" 
Bill after the scrap was over. "Jest keep 
your lamps trimmed for that there piece o' 
calico aft there. Ef it hadn't been for her 
that galoot of a secon' mate'd never have 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



McNAMARA DEFENSE FUND. 



ALL TRADE-UNIONS, INDIVIDUAL 
TRADE-UNIONISTS AND THE PUB- 
LIC AT LARGE ARE URGED BY THE 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE McNA- 
MARA DEFENSE FUND. CONTRIBU- 
TIONS MAY BE SENT TO THE OF- 
FICE OF THE COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL OR TO FRANK MORRISON, 
SECRETARY, AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR, 801-809 G ST., N. W., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Organized Labor Speaks. 

Organized lal)or in Indiana has uttered its 
]irotest against the action of the chief execu- 
tive of tlie State in permitting- John J. Mc- 
Xamara to be taken from the State without 
(hie process of law. The Indiana State Fed- 
eration of Labor, at its convention held at 
Evansville, Ind., passed the following resolu- 
tions without a dissenting voice : 

Since the arrest of Brother J. J. McNamara. 
and his denial of justice in the city court of In- 
dianapolis, the Marion County Circuit Court, pre- 
sided over by the Hon. Charles Renister, has 
decided that Judge Collins has not and never did 
iiave authority and jurisdiction to hear, try or 
determine any question concerning the extradi- 
tion of persons charged with being fugitives from 
justice. 

We therefore condemn the act of James A. 
Collins, Judge of the City Court of Indianapolis, 
for his wrongful assumption of jurisdiction over 
J. J. McNamara, and for denying him the right of 
counsel and opportunity to call witnesses and 
communicate with his friends, as a gross outrage. 
;uid believe that as an officer he is unworthy of 
further holding any office of trust among a people 
who desire justice properly administered and 
rigiitfully upheld. 

We denounce the acts of Governor Thomas R. 
Marshall in the extradition of Brother J. J. Mc- 
N'amara as grossly unjust, lacking in considera- 
tion of the rights of an American citizen, ill ad- 
vised and beneath the dignity of the chief ex- 
ecutive of the State. 

We therefore regard Governor Marshall as an 
officer who acts without due consideration, forms 
his judgments hastily, condemns without investi- 
gation, accepts perjury and refuses thereafter to 
rebuke, but choses rather to condone. 

We therefore ask every citizen to disavow any 
connection with any movement or effort to further 
continue Governor Marshall in office or to satisfy 
his ambition for other or higher honors. 

The convention also appropriated $200 as 
a contribution to the ?klcXamara Defense 
Fund. 



Great Railroad Strike. 

Following is the declaration made by C. 
H. Markham, President of the Illinois 
Central Railroad : "It would only be a ques- 
tion of years till the o])erating men became 
members of the System Federation. That 
would place this railroad at the mercy of a 
compact body of labor able to enforce its 
demands by tying up the entire system at 
all points. That is why I am opposed to the 
System Federation plan of organization." 
Its sentiment was indorsed by the officials 
of the Harriman system of railroads. Act- 
ing on the above assumption the railroad 
officials refused to enter into negotiations 
with the representatives of the Illinois 
Central and L'nion and Southern Pacific 
System Federations. As a result 38.000 
shop men are on strike in fifteen vStates and 
twenty-four cities. 

When the strike was called liie members 
of the diflferent organizations afifected 
promptly walked out. The number of work- 
ers of the diflferent crafts who went on strike 



follows: Boilermakers, 5000: Machinists, 
10,000: Carmen. 14,000; Clerks, 1200: Black- 
smiths and Helpers, 3000; Steamfitters, 500; 
Sheet Metal Workers, 1200; Painters, 2000; 
Laborers (federated), 2000. 

The cities affected by the strike are: 
Centralia, 111.: Memphis, Tenn. ; Oakland, 
Cal.; Birmingham, .\la. ; Freeport, 111.; 
Paducah, Ky. ; Oak Park, Cal.; Houston, 
Te.x. ; Portland, ([)re, : El Paso, Te.x, ; Omaha, 
.\eb, ; Kansas City, Mo. ; Beaumont, Tex, ; 
Cheyenne, Wj'o. ; East St. Louis. 111.: Salt 
Lake City. Utah : Sacramento. Cal. ; East 
Bakersfield, Cal.; Los Angeles, Cal.; Sparks, 
Ney. ; McComb, Miss. ; San Antonio, Tex. ; 
North Platte, Neb., and Tucson, Ariz, 

On Saturday, September 30, the following 
message was flashed over the wires from 
James W. Kline. President of the Brother- 
hood of Blacksmiths, and chairman of the 
strike committee: "Kruttschnitt refuses. 
All efi'orts have failed. All crafts to strike 
Saturday, September 30, 10 a. m. Letter of 
instruction follows. Let every man do his 
duty." The men responded and the great 
battle was on. 

The railroad officials are making frantic 
efl^orts to replace the men with strike- 
breakers, but are meeting with scant suc- 
cess. The shops are guarded and stockaded, 
but the men are confident of success, and 
are determined to win. The citizens at the 
many strike points are in sympathy with 
the strikers, aiul the strike-breakers have 
been the only offenders against the law. 



Ready for the Fray. 

(^n \\'ednesday evening, October 4, Presi- 
dent Gompers of the American Federation 
of Labor reached Washington, D. C, after 
an extended campaign on the Pacific Coast 
and in the \\^estern States. On Thursday 
morning he was at his desk at headquarters, 
and although buried in a mass of corre- 
spondence, found time to express an opinion 
on the signs of the times as far as the labor 
world is concerned. He said ;■ 

There is a feeling of unrest among the workers 
of the world. England, Ireland and the Continent 
of Europe have had their upheavals and the 
workers are awakening to a realization of their 
power in a manner that speaks in uiimistakable 
terms of their determination to secure a more 
equitable portion of that which they produce. 

In our own United States the same feeling of 
unrest prevails and if the employers in this coun- 
try continue their present policy and refuse to 
meet the representatives of organized labor, the 
battle for the uplift may be fought on a larger 
scale than the conflict which has temporarily 
ended in Europe. 

1 have been among the men who toil, every min- 
ute since I left Washington on .August 17. I have 
talked with them, aiul labored with them, and 
have found the measure of their dissatisfaction 
great. Continued refusals on the part of the em- 
ployers to meet the representatives of labor will 
only aggravate the unrest of the workers and no 
one can foretell what the result will be. 

The workers in the West and on the Pacilic 
Coast are conducting a magnificent contest. With 
a bold and determined pur])ose they are dcmiind- 
ing that their rights shall be recognized. Their 
contentions are just and must eventually be con- 
ceded. It would have been a pleasure for me to 
extend my campaign on the Coast, but my duties 
at Headquarters, and the intimation that Judge 
Wright would probably announce his decision in 
the proceedings for contempt which he has in 
itiated on his own account, tliis week made it im- 
iperative for me to return. 

While in Eos Angeles I had an opportunity to 
talk with the McNamara brothers, and, although 
I had to leave them in the gloomy jail, I left them 
with the firm conviction that a jury of their peers 
will soon proclaim their innocence, set them free, 
and remove from labor the stain that an un- 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of .America, IJ/i 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Atlantic District. 

.Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 1}^ Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, III. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., BufTalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., BufTalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 9.3 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Uniteu Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palrnerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National .Sailors and Firemen's Union, Marl- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England, 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
.Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjoinands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway, 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Soniandenes Forbund, Kobenliavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemcene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

I-'edcrazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Geneva, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 
Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Firt 
men). Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



Hop pickers in Kent, England, are 
threatening to strike if their wages be 
not improved. 

After the payment of all expenses 
the last Melhourne (Aus.) eight- 
hours' fete and art union showed a 
clear profit of £1649, of which £1500 
goes to charities. 

The evidence given recently in 
Sydney, Aus., before the "Shortage of 
Labor" Commission was wholy in de- 
nial of the employers' alleged conten- 
tion that labor is scarce. 

The Victorian Minister for Railways 
has for the second time refused to 
receive a deputation from the Vic- 
torian Railways' Union, asking for a 
nnnimum payment of 8s. per day. 

ll(5me Secretary Appel has ex- 
pressed himself favorably inclined to 
the proposal of the Queensland News- 
agents' .Association, that the sale of 
newspapers on Sunday should he pro- 
hibited. 

.\bout 200 Sydney (.-\us.) stove- 
makers have been on strike for some 
time. They want a share of the pros- 
perity that is talked so much about, 
and say they won't return to work 
until they get it. 

During a recent strike of carters 
and drivers at Hobart, Tasmania. 
most of the brickmakcrs refused to 
load non-union carts, and liricklayers 
declined to handle the bricks that 
were carted. 

Henry Broadhearst, for many years 
a Liberal Labor member of Parlia- 
ment and formerly Secretary of the 
Parliamentary Committee of the 
Trades-Union Congress, died at Lon- 
don on October 11, aged 71 years. 

Three hundred cigarette-makers of 
Melbourne (Aus.) have formed them- 
selves into a union, and the police of 
Queensland will be compelled, under 
the new bill, to prosecute any boy 
under 16 caught smoking the product. 

Failure on the part of the British 
railway companies to reinstate some 
of the men who took part in the great 
Knglish railway strike is likely to 
cause a renewal of the trouble on a 
larger scale, according to a statement 
in Reynolds's newspaper. 

Because the firm of Messrs. Grind- 
Icy & Co. of Tunstall, Eng., discharged 
seven girls, 160 other girls went on 
strike for their reinstatement. As a 
result of a meeting between the union 
girls and the employers, the seven 
discharged employes were reinstated, 
and an agreement was entered into 
to the effect that no one would be 
discharged for union activity. 

At a recent meeting of the Victorian 
Coal Miners' Association, a report 
was received on the earnings of the 
men employed at the State mine for 
the previous fortnight. The report 
showed that out of 79 parties 67 had 
sent in their dockets, and the highest 
earnings were 16s. lyid. per shift, and 
tlie lowest 6s. 7'/2d. Eighteen were 
under 10s. and 21 over 13s., the 
average working out at lis. Oyid. a 
shift. 

Floor hands (comps.) in Melbourne 
CAus.) newspaper offices recently se- 
cured a substantial increase in wages, 
as well as an improvement in condi- 
tions. Previously, they had been re- 
ceiving Is. 8d. per hour. They asked 
for 2s. per hour. After considerable 
discussion. Is. 9d. per evening paper, 
and Is. lOd. per hour for morning 
papers was conceded, with payment 
for lunch or supper-time (half-hour) 
and all time worked after 3 a. m. to 
be paid for at overtime rates — time 
and a half. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

SAN PEDRO California 



M. BROWIN 

lANCISCO CLOTHING STORE ANI 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 



THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 



427 PROINX STREET 



SAIN PEDRO 



San Pedro Letter List. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 

All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct froin Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth street 

Between Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAN PEDRO 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 
Medicines, Soaps and Toilet Articles 

FTtONT ST., GPP. S. P. DEPOT 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



^^^^•^»A^^^^^i^^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^/^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye Works 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl .Alex Eduard Malmberg, born 
Malmo, Sweden, 50 years old, tall, 
blond. Mr. Malmberg has been a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific in 1908. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about 50, last 
heard of at Melbourne, Australia, is 
inquired for by his brother. Address 
Martin Johansen, 839 Centennial ave- 
nue, Alameda, Cal. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building. San Francisco. 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on tlie Keg or Bottle 




s 

•Ale 

AND 

Porter 



llnion 

MADE 

Beer ^^ ^ 

^fe)^ Of America r^c:i>r 

COPrRIGHT &TRADE MARK RECISTERED 1903 



*^%,^^t'^^\^\^*.^\^'k^'i.f^^^^^^^*^*y^^^S^S^^^^^^^^^^^'»^^^>^*^^*^i^*^'^^>^<^*>^* 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Hans Merz, who went to Alaska in 
the spring of 1910 on the schooner 
Ottilie Fjord, and upon return left the 
vessel in Tacoma and has not been 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' .Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Will Martin Billington, who was 
employed at Hallverville Cannery last 
summer, communicate at once with 
F. R. Wall, attorney for Otto Schel- 
lin, 324 Merchants' Exchange, San 
Francisco? 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamrn'<! Journal. 



.VndfMFPii. .\x<l C. 
.Anilfison. A. -1-147 
.\ti(ifr.son. V. -lOSO 
.Amine, Kianccsic, 

-5r)5 
.'\nUersson, O. -1363 
Anderson, Anders 
Andersen, Hans C. 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderssen, Hilding 
Anderson, Chas. 
Berndt. Hugo 
RerK. H. T. 
Berggren, Otto 
Buclitman, F. 
Boardsen, S. 
Bulander, B. B. 
Berntsen. Fred 
Berner. Axel 
Backhind. John 
Carlson. O.skar 
Christensen, A., 

-1325 
Christensen, L., 

-1360 
Christensen, Lorentz 
Daugal, A. 
Deinpsey. Harry 
Eikart. Th. G. 
Erickson. Edward 
Engstrom. Richard 
Eugene. John 
Fors, A. 
Frank. Maurice 
Fuss. H. 
Felsch. Chas. 
Fasig. Don 
Fischer. W. 
Fischer. J. -566 
Glaase, Gustav 
Gouda. C. 
Gravier. Eugene 
Graf. Otto 
Hansson. Johannes 
Hansen. Nikolai 
Ilagen, Sigurd 
Hovey, Andrew 
Ualsten. Axel 
Holmes. Oscar 
Hnn.sen. Almar 
Holmes. Alex. 
Holm. Carl 
Heltwood, O. S. 
Halvorsen. H. E. 
Hansen. Berger 
Hogliind, J. A. 
Hod. Fred 
Irwin. Robert 
Infoisson. Jon 
John.'son. Gunnar 
Jacobsen, John 
Johnsen. Ernst 
Jolinson. Louis M. 
.Tnlinson. Hans -1422 
.loliaiispn. Ernest 
Jones. Harry 
Jolinson. J. A. 
Klahn. K. 
Kiisik. M. 
Kallas. A. -921 
King. W. B. 
Kallas, Martin 
Krinkel. J. 
Kuline, W. 



Is.ilow. Rol.crl 
Karlsim, R.agnar 
Lister, W. 
Lutten. Theo. -16.'i3 
Ijarseii. Ma-\sie 
Larseii. Kristian 
Ludviksen, A. -124fl 
Lalne, E. 
Lunder, BJorn 
Murie, T. 
Muhlberg. -Arnold 
Madsen. M. J. 
Martin. W'm. 
Makinen, Karl 
Mathiesen, N. -12»r> 
Martinsen, Martin 
Meyer, H. -1192 
Malmgren, E. 
McRae. A. 
Mellerup, Jens • 
Meyer. H. -1792 
Martin, John B. 
Miller. Charles 
Nyman, Gustav 
Nielsen. Lauritz 
Ochmichen. Fred. 
Olsson. A. P. -1109 
Olsen, Harry -76G 
Ossls, Andrew 
Olsen, O. S. -1123 
Olsen, Anders 
Olsen, Hans C. 
Peterson, John 
Petersen, Lauritz 
Peterson, O. 
Rasmussen, S. Soren 
Richter. Richard 
Roed, I.,eif 
RajTnond. J. 
Strahle, Carl 
Slevers. Herman 
Sandseter. Henry 
Schneider. Henry 
Smith. Ed. 
Salo, Chas. A. 
Stube. Harry 
Sandell. Jolui 
Slatterv, W. H. 
Stephan, M. -U.'iri 
Swansson. Hugo 
Sundstrom, F. 
Scott. Ed. 
Samuelsen. Victor 
Snow. W. 
Smith. J. S. 
Thorsen, Johannes 
Tillman. Charlie 
Thornlund. .lohn 
Udby, Harald 
TTtby. Carl 
Wasserman, Hans 
Wasserman. M. -1262 
Youngson. E. 
Yuhnke. W. (Reg. 

Letter P. O.) 
Zimmer. Walter 
Zimmerman. Fritz 
Zorning. Arthur 

Photos and Packages 

Grossl. Joe 
Pothoff. Harry 
Raustanius. J. 
Schultz, Albert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Nielsen, from Aarhus, Den- 
mark, is inquired for by Christ Han- 
sen, 230 W. Thirty-second street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 

The U. S. District Court in New 
Orleans has decidexl the case of John 
Kauer vs. the SS. Dover in favor of 
the libelant, and the New Orleans 
Agent has collected the money. Any 
one knowing the address of John 
Kauer, please communicate with the 
Sailors' Agent in New Orleans, 
George C. Bodine, 514 Dumaine St. 

I.ott Bartlett Walls, who has been 
sailing for years between San Fran- 
cisco and China, is inquired for by 
his brother, John M. Walls, 2722 
Thomas street, St. Louis, Mo. 

John Percy Bawden. age 29: 7 
years on the Pacific Coast; last 
known address 52 Mission, is inquired 
for by his mother, Mrs. Bessie Baw- 
den, 5 York Rd., Seacombe, Ches- 
hire, England. 

M. Samuelson, born in Gottenborg, 
Sweden, age about 44, last heard of 
in Honolulu, is inquired for by his 
nephew, A. Johnson. Address, Sail- 
ors' Union of the Pacific, San Fran- 
cisco. 

John J. Griffin. No. 8107, L. S. U., 
last heard of at Baltimore, Md., in- 
quired for by his sister, Mrs. Allen, 
4749 Ontario St.. Chicago, 111. 

Richard Standish, an English en- 
gineer, who left the S. S. Kansas 
City in July, 1909. Information want- 
ed by British Consulate, San Fran- 
cisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



C. J. Olsen has been appointed master of the 
steamer Samoa, vice M. J. Madsen; F. J. Jackie 
of the steamer Gold, vice Charles Gustafson. 

G. H. Harvey has been appointed master of 
tlic steamer Sea Fox, vice L. L. Langren; J. M. 
T.angfeldt of the barkentine Makaweli, vice 
Thomas Nielsen. 

Eleven days overdue from Tahiti, the barken- 
tine S. N. Castle arrived at San Francisco on 
October 12. Some apprehension for the safety 
of the Castle was felt when she failed to arrive 
on time. 

The four-masted schooner Oliver J. Olson was 
dismasted in a heavy gale and driven ashore at 
Cape Falso, Lower California. She is a total 
wreck. The crew were rescued and returned to 
San Francisco. 

Within the next few months the speedy pas- 
senger steamers Yale and Harvard will be run- 
ning to Portland, if an investigation being made 
by the owners shows that the move will be a 
paying venture. 

The sloop Red Rock, Carl A. Nelson master, 
the steamer Cazadero, T. F. Van Pelt master, the 
steamer Caspar, M. J. Madsen master, and the 
steamer Tiburon, H. R. White master, have been 
enrolled at San Francisco. 

The steamer Newburg, John G. Hager, master; 
the steamer .Mcatraz, Charles A. B. Johanssen, 
master; the steamer Modoc, C. W. Schuler, mas- 
ter, and the yacht Bonnie Doon, Leslie Oliver, 
master, have been enrolled at San Francisco. 

Captain C. J. Anderson, one of the Colum.bia 
River pilots, has been made master of the Port 
of Portland steamer Ockalahama in place of Cap- 
tain R. Sanstrom, whose license has been sus- 
pended for thirty days for being under the influ- 
ence of liquor while on duty. 

Captain Albert Buhner, who had been in the 
United States revenue-cutter service for more 
than thirty years, died at San Francisco on Octo- 
ber 13, aged 72 years. Captain Buhner was twice 
commended by Congress for meritorious service. 
Deceased was a native of Germany. 

The 286-ton wooden steamer Perdita was 
burned to the water's edge on October 10 two 
miles from Port Ludlow. The twenty-one mem- 
bers of the crew and the two passengers were 
obliged to leap overboard, and clung to pieces of 
wreckage nearly an hotir before launches picked 
them up. 

The Pacific Mail liner Panama returned to San 
Francisco on October 9 in a disabled condition 
due to encountering heavy weather oflf the coast 
of Lower California on the 3d, while en route 
from San Francisco to Mexican and Central 
.American ports. The Panama had a narrow es- 
cape from foundering. 

The last Yukon River steamer sailed from 
Dawson for White Horse on October 10, carry- 
ing the last passengers from the lower Yukon. 
.\1I further travel in the Yukon Valley until next 
spring will be by trail. Two steamers are yet 
to arrive in Seattle ffom Nome before the closing 
of Bering Sea. 

The steamship Victoria, which sailed from 
Nome on October 10 for Seattle with 600 pas- 
sengers, had more than a million dollars in treas- 
ure aboard. The gold is the output of several 
mines in the Seward Peninsula district and is the 
second largest shipment sent to Seattle within the 
recent past few days. 

Captain William A. Irvine, a pioneer shipmas- 
ter, who died at Fruitvale, Cal., was buried in 
San Francisco on October 3. L'vine was 69 years 
of age and a member of California Harbor No. 15 
of American Association of Masters and Pilots. 
He was in the employ of the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company for many years. 

Details were received at Seattle on October 11 
of the loss of the power schooner F. S. Redfield 
on .\ugust 21 on Cape Prince of Wales, which 
is the point of land of the American hemi- 
sphere nearest to Asia. The Redfield went on a 
sandy beach during a violent storm. All hands 
were saved, but the vessel is a total loss. 

.An experiment which is being watched with 
great interest by shipping men is the use of a 
gas-producer engine on the barkentine Archer, 
plying between San I'rancisco and Roche Har- 
bor, in the lime-carrying traffic. The Archer has 



just completed her first trip with the new equip- 
ment and has proved satisfactory, it is reported. 

George H. Zeh has been appointed master of 
the steamer Umatilla, vice G. A. Harris; H. T. 
Payne of the .steamer Olsen & Mahony, vice 
John Moreno; H. C. Nason of the steamer Coast- 
er, vice James F. Higgins; G. W. Beers of the 
steamer Walter Hackett, vice L. A. Bowman. 
The steamer .Amarath, C. W. Nielsen master, has 
been enrolled. 

The four-masted bark Marlborough Hill, of 
Liverpool, which has been to San Francisco a 
number of times and is very well-known on the 
Pacific, has been sold subject to safe arrival and 
usual drydocking clause to Finnish buyers. An- 
other sale reported is that of the Glasgow four- 
masted bark Dowan Hill, which arrived at Cardiff 
July last. 

Captain Follett of the Pacific Mail liner San 
Jose, at San Francisco on October 12 from Cen- 
tral American ports, reported seeing the schooner 
Oliver J. Olson, previously reported as wrecked, 
lying on the rocks ofif Cape Falso. Near by was 
another sailing vessel, which apparently was 
driven ashore in the storm. Her identity was not 
learned by the San Jose's officers. 

Much interest is displayed concerning the re- 
port from Victoria that a steamer twice as large 
and costly as the wrecked liner Empress of China 
is to be provided to take that vessel's place. For 
the present the vacancy made by the wreck of the 
Empress of China is being filled by* the Mont- 
eagle, the vessel which was used as an inter- 
mediary steamer with the three Empresses. 

The whaling bark Gayhead arrived at San 
Francisco on October 9, eight days from Kodiak, 
bringing 900 barrels of sperm oil. On May 1 J. 
E. Jerome, 34 years of age, a native of San Fran- 
cisco, died of natural causes and was buried at 
sea. On September 24 the Gayhead spoke the 
whaling bark John and Winthrop. The latter re- 
ported having landed eleven whales, netting 500 
barrels of oil. 

The historic receiving ship Independence, lo- 
cated at Mare Island Navy Yard, has been grant- 
ed a new lease on life. The news, which causes 
rejoicing both at Mare Island and in Vallejo, 
came from Bremerton on October 10 that the 
cruiser St. Louis was to be put in readiness to 
relieve the Pensacola as receiving ship at Goat 
Island. The Pensacola will be sent up from 
Mare Island for the time being, and will be placed 
in reserve. 

The Pacific Navigation Company's steamer 
Harvard, arriving at San Pedro on October 12 
from San Francisco, made the fastest run down 
she has made since going into service on the 
Coast, the time from the fast Bell at Alcatraz 
Island to the slow bell .at the end of the San 
Pedro breakwater being sixteen hours and forty- 
six minutes. The Yale, however, still holds the 
record with sixteen hours and twenty-one min- 
utes. 

Those interested in the schooner Oliver J. Ol- 
son, of the Olson and Mahony Steamship Com- 
pany, have lost all hope of the vessel being saved. 
Advices from Mazatlan show the impossibility 
af saving either the vessel or her lumber cargo. 
The schooner has broken in two and her port side 
burst out. The deckload was lost when the masts 
went, before the craft was driven ashore, at Cape 
Falso, and to salve what lumber remains in tlie 
hold would necessitate rafting and the chartering 
of a vessel. 



SAILORS READ THIS! 

A company owning over twenty-one square 
miles of rich, well-watered lands, all free of debt, 
wants you to join them in raising sugar cane and 
cattle. You are guaranteed 6 per cent interest 
and you also share in the big dividends. 

Certificates are $100 each, payable cash, or $2 
each month until paid. 

Here is Your Chance to Make Money. 
Share in the profits of this great ranch. Secure 
an INCOME FOR LIFE. 

Write for free booklet. 

LOS HORCONES PLANTATION CO. 

710 Grosse Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



F, R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now |)racticing 
marine law in San Francisco. Me gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange BIdg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery, Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

AfflHated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAIVIEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., l^A I^t^is St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y.. 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 4 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 4 ContI St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS ANU "ATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT, 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Aia., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 Broad. 

Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New Yorlt Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 53 St. Anno St. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. III.. 570 West I>al<e St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONA WANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 MaoI<lnaw Ave. 
MARINE CITY, Mich., P. O. Box 773. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
HURON. O., I.K-ike Seamen's Union. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y.. 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 316 Kinzle St. 
DETROIT. MIoh.. 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABL'LA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111., 83 Ninety-second St 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tot. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1101 W. Ninth St 
MILWAUKEE. Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111.. 314 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 54 Main St. 
DKTflOIT. Mich.. 7 East Woodbridge St 
I'T. HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St 
("ONNIO.M'T, O., 022 Day St 
(XJDIONSHURG. N. Y., 70 I.sabelln SI 
N. 'iONA WANDA, N. V.. 152 Main St 
SIII'ICRIOR, Wis.. 1721 N. Third SI. 
I!.\Y CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. I'a.. 107 E. Third St, 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
(Continued on Page 10,) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLT AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Paclflc, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
em 1 interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 18. 1911. 



.\ ^^T^,^TV xoick stilled. 



\\ lurcas, .Associate Justice Jnhii M. Ilail.'in, 
of the United States Supreme Court, lias de- 
parted this life and joined the great silent ma- 
jority: and 

W'lureas, In life lie was an exempl.ary citizen, 
an upright judge, and a stanch champion of the 
riglits and liberties of the plain people: and 

Whereas, In the memorable Arago case he was 
the only mcinber of the Supreme Court to hold 
that the Thirteenth .\mendment to the Constitu- 
tion of the United States was enacted for the 
benefit of seamen as well as otlur men: there- 
fore be it 

Resolved, lU' the Sailors" Union of the Pacific. 
ill regular meeting .assembled, that we herewith 
voice our dee)) appreciation of Justice Harlan's 
good will and friendly services in behalf of the 
seamen of .\mcrica, and tender our heartfelt 
condolences to his bereaved relatives and friends 
in this their hour of mourning. 

( )t all tlio tributes that will he paid to the 
nieinorv of Justice Harlan none can ))e more 
sincere nor nic^rc sit^nificant of the man's real 
worth than these resolutions, adopted by the 
Sailors" L'nion of the Pacific, at San Fran- 
cisco on the 16tli inst. Justice ?larlan's de- 
votion to human liberty was expressed not 
in i,'-eneral terms and 'as a matter of ethics, 
but in concrete instances affecting the destinies 
of liic humblest citizen. Human liberty, in 
liie conception of this great man, was not a 
theory to be learnedly expounded from the 
])latform or abstrusely treated in law books. 
It was a fact to be recognized in the every- 
day life of the people, a fact of greater im- 
port and to be more zealously maintained in 
proportion to its bearings upon the obscurer 
phases of .social life. In the practice of Jus- 
tice Harlan the highest application of the 
])rinciplc of iniman liberty was tiiat which 
gave freedom to the humblest man. which 
brushed aside the sophistry of law by which 
slavery was iierpetuated. "'under a different 
and less offensive name," which transformed 
tlic status of the slave into that of freeman. 

This characteristic of the Great Dissenter 
was well exemplified in bis dissenting opinion 
in liic Arago case, known in legal circles as 
"Robert Robert.son et al. vs. Barry Baldwin, 
Xo. 334— October Term. 1896." This famous 
case was decided on January 2.^, 1897, upon 
an appeal taken by certain seamen, who had 
been arrested for desertion. The appeal 
turned upon the constitutionality of certain 



sections of the Lnited States Revised Stat- 
utes. In brief, the appellants claimed that 
the.se sections were in conflict with the Thir- 
teenth .Amendment to the Constitution. The 
Supreme Court upheld the con.stitutionality of 
tiie maritime law ui)on the general ground 
tliat the Thirteenth Amendment 'Svas not in- 
tended to introduce any novel doctrine with 
respect to certain descriptions of service which 
have always been treated as exceptional," 
L'pon this and other points in the decision we 
(juote Justice Harlan, as follows: 

The decision just made proceeds upon the 
liroa<i ground that one who voluntarily engages 
to serve upon a private vessel in the capacity of 
a seaman for a given term, but who, without the 
consent of the master, leaves the vessel when in 
I)<irt before the stipulated term is ended and re- 
fuses to return to it, may be arrested and held 
in custo<ly until the vessel is ready to proceed 
on its voyage, and then delivered against his 
will, and if need be by actual force, on the ves- 
sel to the master. 

The Thirteenth .Xmendimnt of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States declares that "neither 
slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a 
punishment for crime, whereof the party shall 
have been duly convicted, shall e.xist within the 
United States, nr any place subject to their juris- 
diction."' 

If it be -^.-lid that Government may make it a 
criminal offense, punishable by fine or imprison- 
ment or both, for any one to violate his private 
coiitr.ict voluntarily made, or to refuse without 
suflicieiit reason to perform it — a proposition 
which can not, I think, be sustained at this day, 
ill this land of freedom — it would by no means 
follow that Governmi'iit could, l)y force applied 
in advance of due conviction of some crime, com- 
pel a freeman to render person;il services in re- 
spect of the private business of another. The 
placin.g of a person, by force, on a vessel about 
to sail, is putting him in a condition of involun- 
l.iry servitude, if the purpose is to compel him 
.against his will to give his personal services in 
the jirivate business in which that vessel is en- 
gaged. The personal liberty of individuals, it 
has been well said, "consists in the power of lo- 
comotion, of changing situation, or moving one's 
persiui to whatsoever place one's own incli'iation 
may direct, without imprisonment or restraint, 
unless by due course of l,nw."' . . . 

It is said that the statute in question is sanc- 
tioned by long usage among the nations of the 
larth, as well .is bv the above .Act of Julv 20, 
1790. 

In considering the antiquity of regulations that 
restrain the i)ersonal freedom of seamen, the 
Court refers to the laws of the ancient Rhodians, 
which are supposed to have antedated the Chris- 
tian era. Hut those laws, whatever they may 
h.ive been, were enacted at :i lime when no ac- 
count was taken of man as man, when human 
life and human liberty were regarded as of little 
\;ilue, .'111(1 when the ))owers of government were 
employed to gr.'itify the ambition and the pleas- 
ures of despotic rulers rather than promote the 
welfare of the people. . . 

In considering this case it is our duty to look 
,(1 the consecpiences of any decision that may be 
rendered. We can not avoid this duty by saying 
that it will be time enough to consider supposed 
cases when they arise. When such supposed 
c;ises do arise, those who seek judicial support for 
extraordinary remedies that encroach upon the 
liberty of freemen will of course refer to the 
principles announced in previous .adjudications, 
and demand their .-ipplication to the particular 
case in hand. 

It is, therefore, entirely approi):iate to iiuiuire 
.IS to the necessary results of the sanction given 
by this Court to the statute here in question. 
If Congress, under it-; power to regulate com- 
merce with forei.gii nations and among the sev- 
eral St.ites, can authorize the arrest of a seaman 
who eiig.aged to serve upon a private vessel, and 
com]Hl him by force to return to the vessel and 
remain during the term for which he engaged, 
a similar rule may be prescribed as to employes 
upon railroa<ls and steamboats engaged in com- 
merce among tlie ,States. Even if it were con- 
ceded — a concession to be made only for argu- 
ment's sake — that it could be made a criminal 
otTensc, punishable by tine or imprisonment or 
both, for such employes to quit their employment 
before the expir.-ition of the term for which they 
agreed to serve, it would not follow tli.it they 
could be compelled, against their will and in ad- 
vance of trial and conviction, to continue in such 
service. But the decision to-day logically leads 
to the conclusion that such a power exists in 
Congress. . . . 

It veems to mc that the Thirteenth .\meiid- 
inent, although tolerating involuntary servitude 
only when imposed as a punishment for crime 
of which the party shall have been duly convict 
e<l. has been construed, by the decision just ren- 
dered, as if it contained an additional clause ex- 
pressly excepting from its operation seamen who 
engage to serve on private vessels. Under this 
view of the Constitution, we may now look for 
advertisements, not for runaway servants as in 
the days of slavery, but for runaway seamen. 
In former days, overseers could stand with whip 
in hand over slaves and force them to perform 



personal service for their masters. While, with 
the assent of all, that condition of things has 
ceased to exist, we can but be reminded of the 
past when it is adjudged to be consistent with 
the law of the land for freemen who happen to 
be seamen to be held in custody that they may 
be forced to go aboard vessels and render per- 
sonal services against their will. 

In my judgment the holding of any person in 
custody, vvhether in jail or by an officer of the 
l;iw. against his will, for the purpose of compel- 
ling hini to render personal service to another 
in a private business, places the person so held 
in custody in ;i conditir)n of involuntary ser\i- 
Inde forbidden by the Constitution of the United 
States: C(uise(|uently, that the statute as it now 
is, and under which the appellants were arrested 
at .\storia and placed against their will on the 
barkeiitiue .\rago, is null and void, and their re- 
fusal to work on such vessel after being forciblv 
returned to it could not be made a public offense 
authorizing their subsequent arrest at San Fran- 
cisco. 

I dissent from tlie opini<in and judgment of 
the Court. 

The strongest commentary upon the views 
of Ju.stice Harlan lies in the fact that they 
formed the basis of an appeal to Congress, 
with the result that in the year following that 
body passed the White .\ct, under the terms 
of which seamen were granted the right to 
leave their vessel at any port in the LTnited 
States or near-by foreign countries — i. e., 
Canada, Mexico, Newfoundland and West 
Indies. Thus the construction of the Consti- 
tution for which Justice Harlan contended 
became the law of the land. To the clear- 
sighted statement of the principle involved 
and the inspiration afforded by Justice Har- 
lan's ringing words, the seamen of America 
owe the hope and the courage which sustained 
them in the labor of working out their own 
salvation from tiic slave status under which 
they formerly lived, and which sstill sustains 
them in the task of extending the liberties 
thus achieved until they shall prevail through- 
out the world. 

The Nation and the world have lost a friend 
and champion. .\ mighty voice is stilled: but 
its reverberations will continue to be heard as 
long as liopc shall survive injustice. Nowhere 
will those thunder-tones strike a more resjjon- 
sivc cliord than in the hearts of those "free- 
men who ha])])e!i to ho seamen"! 



RI':i'()RT ON L.Mx'K STL.\MLRS. 



The Chicago l-'ederation of Labor is to be 
commended for its interest in the subject of 
undermanning on tiie steamers of the Great 
Lakes. The rejKtrt of that • body, published 
in this issue, goes right to the bottom of the 
matter, leaving no room' for doubt as to the 
imjierative need of legislation. To mention 
just two points covered by tiie report, there 
is the evidence that on many steamers only 
one man is available for .service in an emer- 
gency, and the fact that absolutely no law 
exists by which the matter of manning may 
be regulated with a view to public safety. 

The facts arc, of course, well known to 
seamen, but tiiis doc« not lessen the value of 
the I'ederation's report and recommendations. 
< )ii the contrary, the report posses.ses the merit 
of disinterestedness, and is therefore likely to 
carry greater weight with those responsible 
for the legislation, or rather lack of legisla- 
tion, on the subject. The reference to the 
Slocum case is peculiarly apropos. That ca- 
lamity was due in great part to the absolute 
incomjjetency of tlie vessel's crew. That a 
repetition of the Slocum di.sa.stcr may hap])en 
at any time is not merely a pos.sibility, it is a 
rea.sonable certainty. The Chicago Federation 
of Labor has done well in drawing public at- 
tention to this situation and in urging the 
passage of the only measure by which the sit- 
uation mav be effectually met. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



FEDERATION AND SEAMEN. 



The recent convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor acted upon several 
propositions of special interest to the organ- 
ized seamen. For the information of our 
readers we reproduce these propositions from 
the official proceedings, as follows : 

Whereas, Under the Chinese Exclusion Act 
alien Chinese, except those of certain exempted 
classes, are excluded from the jurisdiction of the 
United States; and 

Whereas, Many American vessels engaged in 
the foreign trade are manned wholly or in part 
by alien Chinese seamen; and 

Whereas, This practice is a violation of the 
Chinese Exclusion Act, the Supreme Court of 
the United States having declared that "an 
American ship is American soil"; therefore, be it 
Resolved, By the California State Federation 
. of Labor, in convention assembled, that the Chi- 
nese Exclusion Act should be enforced on Amer- 
ican vessels, and the employment of Chinese 
seamen upon such vessels prohibited. 
Respectfully submitted, 

E. ELLISON, 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, San Erancisco. 



Whereas, The fishing industry of California is 
being fast appropriated by Japanese and other 
Oriental coolie laborers who are ineligible for 
citizenship in the United States and who cannot 
be assimilated as an integral part of the body 
politic; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By the California State Eederation 
of Labor, in convention assembled, that we favor 
an amendment to the Fishermen's License Act, 
by inserting these words in Section Three of said 
.\ct, after the word "dollars" in the eighthline: 
"To any person not eligible to become a citizen 
of the United States upon payment of One Hun- 
dred ($100.00) Dollars." so that Section^ Three in 
its amended form will read as follows: "Licenses 
shall be issued and delivered upon an application 
to the State Board of Fish and Game Commis- 
sioners or their deputies. The licenses herein 
provided for shall be issued as follows: To any 
citizen of the United States upon the payment of 
Two and One-half (2^) Dollars; to any person 
not a citizen of the United States upon the pay- 
ment of Ten ($10.00) Dollars; to any person not 
eligible to become a citizen of the United States 
upon the payment of One Hundred ($100.00) 
Dollars," and so on to the end of the section as 
the law now reads; and, be it further 

Resolved, That the officers and legislative 
agents of this Federation be directed to use every 
effort and honorable means within their power 
to further the passage and enactment of the law 
as hereinbefore suggested, in the interest and 
for the protection of the thousands of natives 
and naturalized citizens and white workers who 
some day will become a part of our people and 
who must depend upon the fishing industry of 
our State for a livelihood for themselves and for 
those who are dependent upon them. 
L N. HYLEN, 

CHARLES F. HAMMARIN, 
Alaska Fishermen's Union, San Francisco. 



The following communication was submitted 
by the Seamen's delegation: 
To the California State Federation of T..abor: 

Fellow Delegates: The undersigned delegates 
to the convention representing unions afiRliated 
with the International Seamen's Union of Amer- 
ica, hereby, on behalf of our respective organ- 
izations, extend to the Federation our thanks 
for assistance rendered in obtaining the passage 
of Senate Bill No. 247, a bill to repeal Section 
645 of the Penal Cod^^ of California, which made 
it a misdemeanor to "entice a seaman to desert," 
that is to leave his employment; thus bringing to 
a successful conclusion the struggle the seamen 
of this State for equal rights with working people 
on shore in the matter of quitting employment. 



CALIFORNIA IN THE LEAD. 



California, from being a plantation of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad, has become the 
freest State in the Union. By their votes on 
the 10th inst. the people of that State have 
restored popular government in a measure not 
exceeded by that prevailing in any part of 
the world. It was a glorious victory! 

Each of the twenty-three amendments to 
the Constitution was adopted by a consider- 
able margin. The amendments providing for 
the Initiative and Referendum and the Recall 
were adopted by majorities of three to one, 
or more. The Workmen's Compensation 
amendment was among those receiving the 
highest vote. In a sense the most important 
amendment, that granting women equal po- 



litical rights with men, was carried by about 
3000 majority, notwithstanding a large ad- 
verse vote in San Francisco and vicinity. 
The men of the "cow counties" proved true 
to the principle of human equality and saved 
the Woman Suiifrage amendment from defeat. 
It is gratifying to note that the vote for this 
amendment was relatively larger in the "labor" 
districts of San Francisco than in the more 
"culshud" quarters. 

When we reflect that only a few years ago 
many of these reforms were almost universally 
sneered at as "visionary," not to use a harsher 
term, the results of the recent election are lit- 
tle short of miraculous. Summed up, the in- 
cident proves that although the people may be 
slow to move, when they do move they are 
apt to "go some." We congratulate our fel- 
low citizens, and trust that the power now 
vested in them may be used to make Califor- 
nia not only the freest but the best governed 
State in the whole wide world. 



HAVELOCK WILSON COMING. 



Joseph Havelock Wilson, leader of the great 
seamen's strike in Europe, is now being re- 
ceived with open arms where formerly his 
very name was anathema. An example of the 
changed attitude of the shipowners toward 
the seamen's leader is contained in a press in- 
terview with Sir Walter Runciman, from 
which we qtiote as follows : 

I think it will be admitted that T know Mr. 
^Vilson and his work as well as, if not better 
than, any other shipowner in the United King- 
dom. I have discussed with him from time to 
time the objects he had in view and the com- 
plaints he had to make. I have often agreed, 
and sometimes disagreed with his aims, but I 
have always found him most tolerant when we 
have conversed about these matters alone. I have 
sat on a Departmental Committee with him for 
well nigh two years, and on the Advisory Com- 
mittee of the Board of Trade for over four years, 
and he has brought into our deliberations rare 
intelligence, vivid imagination, a full knov/ledge 
of his subject, and a pertinacity that stands him 
and his cause in good stead. Occasionally I have 
had to take strong sides against him, but for the 
most part he has had my support. He is never 
vindictive or offensive to his opponents. When 
they say something that ruffles him he fires up, 
but even then his resentment, vigorously spoken, 
passes away quickly, and he assumes a friendli- 
ness that you can not help liking. 

In fact. Mr. Havelock Wilson is a different per- 
son on the platform from what he is when he 
settles down to talk seriously of those ideals he 
thinks should, and can, be accomplished in the 
interests of the class he represents. 

It would be arrant folly to cause further trou- 
ble by saying that he does not represent the sea- 
men. It was he who originated the strike, and 
it was also he who settled it, and no one can 
justly say that the terms put forward by him 
through his representatives were arbitrary. 

Comrade Wilson is now on the way to Aus- 
tralia as a means of regaining his health, 
which has .suffered much of late. He is ex- 
pected to arrive in San Franci-sco in the early 
spring. That he will be warmly welcomed by 
the organized seamen everywhere throughout 
the United States goes without .saying. 



A short time ago the British Pest Office 
laid a new and improved telephone cable in 
the Straits of Dover, and this has recently 
been connected to land lines from London 
and Paris, thereby providing increased and 
improved telephone facilities between the 
two capitals. By the extension of these cir- 
cuits to provincial towns speech is rendered 
possible between places in England and 
France which could not previously com- 
municate with each other. In order to de- 
termine the extent of the increased range, 
experiments have recently been carried out 
by English and French officials from a num- 
ber of provincial towns on this side of the 
channel. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 16. 1911. 

Regular meeting came to order at 7:30 p. m.. 
h'rank Johnson presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. ShiiJwrcck Benefit was ordered 
paid to a member wlio lost his clothing in the 
schooner Rosamund. 

Notice: The election of delegates to the Bal- 
timore convention of the I. S. U. of .A., will be 
held in the regular meetings held at Headquar- 
ters and Branches on Nov. 6, 1911. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Situation fair. 
P. O. Box 1365. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 8, 1911. 



JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 



Tacoma .\gency. Oct. 9, 1911. 
-Shipping dull; prospects better. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel, Main 808. 



Seattle .'\gency, Oct. 9. 1911. 
.Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 9, 1911. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229'/2 Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 9, 1911. 
-Shipping (lull. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 2002, 



Portland, Ore., Agency. Oct. 9. 1911. 
-Shipping medium. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka .\gency, Oct. 10, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

JOHN W, ERICKSEN. ,\gent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 9, 1911. 
.Sliip])ing fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu /\gency. Oct. 2. 1911. 
-Shippin.g medium: prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Head(|uarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 13, 1911. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping quiet, plenty of men ashore. 
Voting for delegates to the Convention of the 
1. S. U. of A. will commence at Headquarters 
and the Branches on or about October 27 for 
four consecutive meetings. The Shipwreck Ben- 
efit was ordered paid to a member wrecked on 
the steamer City of Panama. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agciicy. Oct. 5. 1911. 
-Shijiping dull. Nominated ofRcers for the en- 
duing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
1003 Western Ave. P. O. Box 1335. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 



San Pedro .\gcncy, Oct. 4, 1911. 
-Shipping and prospects quiet; plenty of men 
ashore. Nominated officers for the ensuing terni. 
ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box .54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chica.go, Oct. 9, 1911. 
(ieneral situation quiet. 

VICTOR A. OLANDER, Secretary 
570 VV. Lake St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

lleadcpiartcrs, Boston, Mass.. Oct. 9, 1911. 
Shipping ,-ind general situation fair. 

WM. H. ERAZIER, Secretary. 
l^A Lewis St. 



DIED. 

Jacob Salvesen, No. 851, a native of Norway, 
aged 39, died at San Francisco, Cal., on Oct. 10, 

1011. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^^^* 



OIV THE GREAT LAKES, 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*^^* 



LOOK OUT FOR ROOT! 



One of our executive officers, \^'illiam F. 
Root, has joined a detective agency. He was 
delegate at Milwaukee. Wis., for the Marine 
Firemen, Oilers and Watcrtenders of the 
Ivakes during the season of 1900, and was 
agent at Chicago, 111., during 1910. and up to 
May, 19n. 

Robert Clarke, our agent at Milwaukee, 
had Root under suspicion for .some time and 
found out he was in communication with 
the Mutual Detective .Agency, No. 110 East 
2.Sth St., New York City. Root assaulted a 
fellow-boarder at Milwaukee, Wis., and 
when taken to court swore under oath that 
he joined the Mutual Detective Agency. 

It was found that Root had in his posses- 
sion letterheads bearing the heading, "Root 
Detective Bureau." A private detective badge 
and circular gave the full name of that con- 
cern, as the "Mutual Detective Training As- 
sociation," which issues a bulletin described 
in the circular as follows: 

"The ^Mutual Detective Training Associa- 
tion represents detectives from all parts of 
the United States who enrolled with us for 
the purpose of transferring their work from 
one locality to another and for their mutual 
benefit." Root was told by Agent Clarke of 
Milwaukee to appear at the hall to stand 
trial for violating Section 7, Article 3 of the 
Constitution, which reads: ".Any member 
who connects himself in any way with a de- 
tective agency shall be expelled from this 
As.sociation." 

Root did not show up at the hall to stand 
trial, but came around on the night of Sep- 
tember 23 and gave his book to the janitor, 
named Thomas Murphy, and told the janitor 
he would be a detective right. 

Root is twenty-six years old, 5 feet 8 
inches in height, hair light, complexion fair, 
eyes brown, false upper teeth filled with 
gold, and a native of Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Brother unionists, these are the people 
that are in the ranks of union labor that all 
union men have to be on the lookout for, 
and any union man shielding men of this 
caliber should be got rid of very quickly 
out of the ranks of any organized body for 
their own protection. 

This young man was used better than .some 
of his own peojjle could use him by the 'Ma- 
rine Firemen and Oilers' Association of the 
I^kes. When he met with an accident he had 
claimed in the line of duty the Association 
l)aid one hundred dollars for new teeth he 
had put in, and this is what the Association 
gets back from him, by joining a detective 
agency to tell all he knows about organized 
labor, although there is no secrecy whatso- 
ever in the Marine Firemen's Association of 
the Lakes. So, brother unionists, beware 
of men of this young man's caliber. He is, 
perhaps, better off working for the agency 
he has joined than to be a member of a labor 
organization, and the Marine Firemen and 
( )ilcrs of the Lakes i« lucky to get rid of 
him from among the ranks of the good loyal 
members of the .Association. 

Mich. Mil. Caskv. 
Secretary Marine l-'iremen. Oilers and Water 
Tenders. 

r.uffalo, Oct. 9, 1911. 



STEAMER FISHER SOLD. 



The steamer E. L. Fisher, which is now 
at the Ecorse shipyards, where she was 
taken after being raised from the Detroit 
River, was sold recently to the Toledo Ship- 
building Company for $42,750. The formal 
transfer awaits the confirmation of the deal 
by the foreign underwriters who are ex- 
pected to sanction the sale. 

Following the opening of bids on Septem- 
ber 28, at the Salvage Association office at 
Cleveland it was decided not to sell the boat 
to the highest bidder who was willing to pay 
$32,500 for her. The Toledo Shipbuilding 
Company was second high bidders, oflfering 
$30,000. Negotiations with the different 
prospective purchasers was started with a 
view to getting a price nearer the appraised 
value of the ship. 

The underwriters are $10,000 ahead by the 
move. While the boat was appraised at 
about $64,000 in her damaged condition, the 
valuation was based on what she cost when 
she came out and not on the price that can 
be obtained for boats on the present market. 
The deal is generally considered a good one 
for the underwriters considering the lateness 
of the season and the poor showing vessels 
are making this year. 

It will cost about $40,0CX) to put the Fisher 
in the shape she was in before the collision 
with the steamer S. M. Clement last spring. 
This will make the boat in salable condition 
cost at least $80,000 without adding any- 
thing for the capital invested. When she 
came out last season she was worth more 
than $100,000. 

"We do not represent anyone except our- 
selves in this purchase," said C. B. Calder, 
General Manager of the Toledo Shipbuild- 
ing Company. "W'e are buying the Fisher 
with the intention of reselling her. During 
the winter we shall make the necessary re- 
pairs and next spring she will be put on 
the market." 



WADE-CODORUS COLLISION. 



The steamer J. 1 1. \\'ade, downbound with 
ore, on October 3 was beaciied on Bedorcs 
Island, St. Clair River, following a collision 
with the steamer Codorus. upbound with 
merchandise. Something went wrong with 
the Codorus as she was about to pass the 
Wade and caused her to sheer, striking the 
ore-carrier on the port side abreast of the 
engine-room. 

The accident occurred just above South- 
east Bend. The steering gear of the Co- 
dorus is thought to have broken. According 
to reports from the wreck the Codorus hit 
the Wade a glancing blow, cracking some 
plates. Water rushed in faster than the 
pumps were able to take it out and the ves- 
sel was in danger of sinking. The boat was 
directed toward tlie American shore where 
she was beached. 

Captain W. C. Richardson owns the 
steamer Wade while the Codorus is one of 
the -Anchor line boats. The ^\^ade is a sis- 
ter-ship of tlie steamer joliet, wliich a few 
weeks ago was sunk in collision with the 
steamer Phipps at the head of St. Clair 
River opposite Port Huron. 



STEAMER WATERLOGGED. 



The steamer A. L. Hopkins is waterlogged 
on Lake Superior and is a menace to navi- 
gation. George A. Marr, secretary of the 
Lake Carriers, has sent bulletins to all the 
Lake ports, and the canal officials at the Soo 
were instructed to notify masters of all up- 
bound vessels. President Livingstone was 
notified and he will probably make arrange- 
ments to have the wrecked boat beached or 
towed into port. 

The Hopkins was bound down from Du- 
luth with a cargo of hemlock lumber and 
the water poured into her hold so fast that 
the members of her crew deserted the boat. 
The seamen were picked up by the steamer 
Alva C. Dinkey, of the Pittsburg Steamship 
Company about two hours after they left 
the Hopkins and landed at .Ashland. 

Captain W. J. Hunt, master of the Dinkey, 
on his arrival reported the matter to the Du- 
luth office, and the following dispatch was 
received at the office of the Pittsburg Steam- 
ship Company : 

"Captain Hunt, of the steamer Dinkey, 
on arrival at Ashland at 3 p. m. reported 
that he picked up the crew, numbering thir- 
teen men, of the steamer .\. 1^. Hopkins at 8 
o'clock this morning. The Hopkins is loaded 
with hemlock lumber and is still adrift with 
her bow high out of water, but her boiler 
house is completely under water. She is in 
the track of vessels between Ashland and 
Keweenaw, about sixteen miles northeast by 
east of Michigan Island. .A southeast wind 
is blowing and unless she fetches up on one 
of the islands she will drift over in the path 
of vessels bound for Duluth. Captain Hunt 
advises all vessels to l)e on the lookout." 



BUTT OF JOKE WANTS PAY. 



Suit for $15,000 damages against the 
Great Lakes Towing Company, was filed 
in United States Court at Toledo on .August 
30 by .Margaret A. Todd. The woman al- 
leges in her ]>elition that when she sat upon 
the bench which is along the sidewalk at 
the office of the Great Lakes Towing Com- 
pany slie received a severe electric shock, 
which resulted in permanent injuries. She 
said the seat had been charged by practical 
jokers. 



.\ fog signal for Lorain seems assured. 
Congressman W. G. Sharp has received a 
letter from the acting commissioner of the 
lUireau of Lighthouses in which that official 
states he has recommended an appropriation 
of $45,000 for a light and fog signal for this 
harbor. Vcsselmen say the harbor is hard 
to enter during a fog and there are many 
fogs because of the great volume of smoke 
from the local steel mills. 



.About September 1 the fixed red light ex- 
hiliited on the west breakwater pierhead at 
Fairport, Lake Eric, will be replaced by a 
flashing white light showing one .group of 
two flashes every four seconds, thus, flash 
0.2 second, eclipsed 0.3 second, flash 0.2 sec- 
ond, eclipsed 3.3 seconds. The new light 
will be exhibited forty feet above the water 
and twenty-five feet above the base of the 
structure, from a white, square, pyramidal, 
skeleton-steel tower with enclosed base. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



GOOD WORK OF LIFE SAVERS. 



In the grip of a gale that swept over Lake 
Erie from North Dakota, and with great 
waves breaking over her decks, threatening 
every moment to swamp her, the Govern- 
ment dredge, the Maumee, struck on the 
rocks of the east breakwater late in the 
afternoon of October 4. 

Her crew of thirteen men would have 
gone to the bottom had it not been for a 
masterly bit of seamanship displayed by 
Cai)tain Hansen, of the Life-Saving station. 
The captain succeeded in tossing a line to 
the sinking dredge, and hauled the crew to 
safety across thirty feet of spray and foam. 

The striking of the Maumee was the most 
serious result of the high gale that blew 
from the northwest, tying up shipping on 
the Great Lakes and working much havoc in 
Cleveland. 

Half a score of tugs circled about the 
Maumee after she struck the breakwater, 
vainly endeavoring to rescue the crew of 
thirteen men from death. At 5 o'clock the 
Maumee's crew were given up for lost, but 
Captain Hans Hansen came to the rescue, 
ran his frail launch upon the breakwater, 
landed eight men, cast a line to the dredge 
and hauled the Maumee's crew to safety. 

Just at dusk Captain Hansen, with eight 
hardy life-savers, stood upon the jagged 
sides of the east breakwater near the river 
gap. A fierce gale blew from the northwest. 

A dangerous sea thundred all about them, 
threatening to sweep the half-naked men 
from their precarious position on the slip- 
pery rocks to death. 

But the life-savers held on. The crews of 
ten tugs watched their movements. Through 
the blinding spray the life-savers cast a line 
to the Maumee. It caught. Frank Hunt 
made the line fast on the dredge and in the 
high wind, across thirty feet of foam and 
waves, the life-savers hauled the thirteen 
men to the breakwater. 



FAR BEHIND LAST YEAR. 



Lake traffic at Ashtabula for September, 
according to a report made by Deputy Col- 
lector Jarvis, shows an appreciable improve- 
ment in ore, and the same rush in coal which 
has prevailed most of the season. 

To date the ore receipts are a little more 
than 3,000,000 tons behind the same time 
last year, which is considerably less than 
50 per cent, decrease. Two months ago less 
than half the ore had been handled which 
was unloaded the same period in 1910. The 
exact figures are: Ore, L059,3,31 tons; coal, 
68L356 tons, and exports, $518,476.65. 



The little steamer Alpena recently took 
out a load of 3,500 tons of slack coal from 
No. 1 coal dump. This may give the Alpena 
the record for the largest number of trips 
made on the Lakes this summer. The latest 
cargo was the sixty-eighth taken by this 
vessel this season. She went to .Mpena. 
The vessel carries a deck unloading crane 
which enables her to unload faster than 
many other boats. In her sixty-eight trips 
this season the Alpena carried approximate- 
ly 238,000 tons of coal. 



The barges No. 87 and No. 120, which 
were built by the .American Shipbuilding 
Company at the Cleveland and Lorain yards 
for the Standard Oil C<>mi)any, were placed 
in connnission recenlh'. 



CONVICT SAILOR OF MURDER. 



William Gerses, 19, a Hungarian sailor of 
Cleveland, was convicted of murder in the 
second degree at Ashland, Wis., on Septem- 
ber 19. He shot and killed Charles ]\Ic- 
Mahon of Midland, Out., on the ore carrier 
Alva Dinkey at Ashland last June. The 
American-Hungarian .society backed Gerses. 

The Pittsburgh Steamship Company paid 
the murdered man's widow $950 and offered 
assistance in the prosecution. Gerses shot 
McMahon while intoxicated. The plea of 
insanity was entered. The row started oxer 
an assault on the captain following a row 
over wages. Gerses will get from 14 to 
25 vears. 



NEW BOATS ORDERED. 



Daniel K. Ford, of Xew York, sui)crin- 
tendent of marine equipment for the Stand- 
ard Oil Company, was in Cleveland re- 
cently looking after the new boats which 
the American Shipbuilding Company built 
for his firm. The Standard has closed a 
contract with the New York Shipbuilding 
Company for a steamer for the Coast trade, 
but no orders have been placed for vessels 
for the Lakes. The steamer which will be 
built by the New York firm will be 330 
feet keel, 46 feet beam and 27 feet deep. 
She will come out next spring. 



WORK IS STARTED. 



The work of raising the wreck of the 
.steamer W. C. Richardson, which foundered 
on Waverly Shoal two years ago, was start- 
ed on September 12, when Captain William 
H. Raker started out with his wrecking out- 
fit and a crew of men and divers. 

The cofferdam which for the last two 
months has been in the course of construc- 
tion was placed around the decks of the 
boat and everything is in readiness to begin 
pumping. Captain Baker stated that he ex- 
pects to have the boat in port within a week, 
weather permitting. 



SHOAL LARGER THAN REPORTED. 



Waverly Shoal, just outside of the Buffa- 
lo harbor, extends directly into the path 
of vessels following the charted course into 
that i)ort, according to investigations made 
by the Lake Survey. The shoal has been 
known as a small one to the north of the 
charted sailing course and has been marked 
by a gas buoy. The recent investigation 
revealed the shoal extends seven-eighths of 
a mile southeasterly from the buoy. The 
minimum depth in the course is 19 feet 2 
inches. 



SCHOONER TO BE SOLD. 



Judge Hazel of the United States District 
Court at Piuffalo on .\ugust 29 issued a de- 
cree permitting the sale of the schooner 
D. !•;. Rhodes, which is owned in Detroit. 
A libel recently was filed against the 
schooner for wages, the total amount of the 
claims being $253.35. The claims were not 
satisfied by the owners of the vessel, conse- 
quently judge Hazel issued the order per- 
mitting the sale, which will be held at North 
Tonawanda. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persua- 
ding seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas Reid, marine fireman, 45 Assump- 
tion street, Detroit, Mich., is inquired for by 
his mother. 



Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



The Hubbard Steamship Company has 
been incorporated under the laws of Ohio 
with headquarters at Mentor to take over 
the steamer Henry A. Hawgood, purchased 
by Captain W. C. Richardson. Captain 
Richardson is manager and treasurer of the 
new company. He has appointed H. S. 
Lyons, who brought out the boat, master, 
and James Gag, chief engineer. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 
570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
Telephone, Franklin 278. 
BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South, 

BUFFALO, N. Y 56 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR. 21 High Street 

Telephone 652. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

TOLEDO, 64 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756, 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 162 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 385. 

RAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

ERIE. Pa 107 E. Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNBAUT HARBOR. 992 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 

HURON. O Lake Seamen's Union 

M.vniNE CITY, Mich P. O. Box 773 

POR'l' HURON, Mich 617 Water Street 

KINGSTON. Ont Box 96 

HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

A.shland. Wis. Manitowoc. Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor. O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo. N. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw. Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay. Mich. Sheboygan. Wis. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis, 

Ludlngton, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O, 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



scrupulous organization of employers, the Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers, with its 
$1,500,000 fund to crush labor, would fain fasten 
upon it. Before I saw the McNamara brothers 
in jail I was positively convinced of their inno- 
cence. After talking with them in Los Angeles 
T am convinced that they are the victims of one 
n{ the most diabolical plots ever hatched in our 
country. 

In T-os .\ngcles every effort has been made to 
prejudice the citizens against the McNamaras. 
Detective Burns, his employers and satellites have 
already tried them in the newspapers and maga- 
zines, but justice will prevail and the plots of the 
tiiemics of labor will fail. The people of Los 
.\ngclcs are realizing more and more that an un- 
holy effort has been and is being made to sacrifice 
innocent men so that a stain may be cast on the 
cause they represent. The .\merican Federation 
of Labor will stand by the McNamaras. We 
know they are innocent. We have secured for 
them the services of the ablest lawyers who can 
not he bought, and I am confident that when the 
trial is over and the plots of the enemies of labor 
have been disclosed, organized labor will be com- 
mended and praised for its position in the Mc- 
Namara case. 



Important Court Decision. 

Organized labor in the State of Wash- 
ington is rejoicing over a decision recently 
handed down by the Supreme Court of that 
State, which sustained the constitutionality 
of the Workmen's Compensation Act, 
passed at the last session of the Legislature. 
This beneficent legislation was secured 
through the efforts of the labor organiza- 
tions. 

In handing down the decision the court 
said : "A business that seeks a profit at the 
risk of the life and limb of human beings is 
subject to regulation, and that law is, or 
ought to be, a progressive scheme, and the 
Constitution must be construed in the light 
of our changed conditions." 

The constitutional questions raised were 
that the law deprived individuals of their 
property without due process of law ; that it 
(lid not apply to all alike and was class legis- 
lation ; that it was contrary to the provisions 
directing uniform taxation, and that it vio- 
lated the right of trial by jury. 

The decision was written by Judge Fuller- 
ton and was signed bv the full court. 



LAKE STEAMERS UNDERMANNED. 

(Continued from Page I.) 



deck in tin pans. These men cannot and 
do not remain on a vessel long enough to 
become familiar with the routine of the 
ships. Most of them may be described as 
"down and outs" from various trades and 
callings. 

This committee certainly does not deem 
such men fit to safeguard the lives of pas- 
.sengers, — on the contrary, they appear to be 
a iTienace to both ships and passengers. 
They are of the same type as described in 
the report of the United States Commission 
of Investigation upon disaster of the steam- 
er General Slocum. The Slocum tragedy 
occurred at New York, June 15th, 1904, and 
resulted in a loss of 955 out of 1358 passen- 
gers. Describing the deck crew of that 
steamer, the Commission said : 

The deckhands are apparently picked up with 
very little consideration as to the knowledge of 
their duties, have very little discipline, change 
from year to year (only one of the Slocum's deck- 
hands liaving been on the vessel before this 
year), and are unfitted to meet any such emer- 
gency as was presented by the disaster to the 
General Slocum, or to^^roperly take care of such 
peculiarly dangerous traffic as that on excursion 
boats. 

The ineflSciency and poor quality of the deck 
crew of this vessel, doubtless typical of the ma- 
jority of the crews on excursion steamers, is one 
of the essential facts that caused the loss of so 
many lives. (Report of the U. S. Commission of 
investigation upon the Disaster of the Steamer 
General Slocum. p. 24.) 



\Ve have examined into the law governing 
the operation of passenger vessels and find 
that in the matter of equipment and machin- 
ery there arc rules governing almost every 
detail of inspection, construction, size and 
capacity, but, except in the case of licensed 
officers, not one word requiring the employ- 
ment of competent men to handle such 
e(|uipmcnt appears anywhere in the law. 
Proper life saving appliances are absolutely 
necessary, but, we submit, such equipment 
is practically useless unless there is also on 
board each vessel a sufficient number of ex- 
perienced seamen trained to properly handle 
such equipment in emergencies. 

In conference held at the offices of the 
Government Steamboat Inspectors, the sub- 
ject matter relating to all those who patron- 
ize the passenger and excursion boats out of 
this port was discussed. They stated that 
the evils complained of must be remedied 
through national legislation and they were 
powerless to change existing conditions. 

To remedy the present conditions we find 
that there has been introduced in Congress 
by the Hon. Wm. B. Wilson of Pennsylvania 
at the request of the International Seamen's 
Union, a Bill — H. R. 11372, and approved 
by the American Federation of Labor Leg- 
islative Committee, which provides that on 
any steam vessel seventy-five per cent, of 
the deck crew must have at least three years' 
experience on deck at sea or on the Great 
Lakes. This bill, if enacted into law, will 
do mtich to remedy the present deplorable 
conditions on the passenger boats, and will 
give much greater security to both life and 
property on such vessels. 

In the interest of public safety, we recom- 
mend that the Chicago Federation of Labor 
and its affiliated unions give their earnest 
endorsement to the aforesaid bill, and that 
organizations represented in this Federation 
and the individual members thereof should 
urge upon Congress the necessity of enact- 
ing said bill into law. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. C. DirxoN, Chainnan : 

J.NMES LiNEHAN, 

Wm. Vors.\tz, 
Ch.\s. Sukike, 
g. soderbkrc., 
Fred Wim.i.xms, 
Wm. Quinl.\n, 

C. D. WiiEEi.ER, Secretary. 
The above report was adopted by the Chi- 
cago Federation of I^abor at its regular meet- 
ing October 1, and the Secretary of that body 
was instructed to send a copy to all Con- 
gressmen from the various districts in Cook 
county. It was also decided that the report 
should be printed in pamphlet form for gen- 
eral distribution. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATfORM. 



.\ movement has been started to improve 
the conditions of the brass casters in Eng- 
land. The demands include the following: 
.Ml workers to be advanced Is. r24 cents) 
per hundredweight (112 pounds) ; no deduc- 
tion of any kind to be made from earnings ; 
no work tooled to be considered waste. It 
is claimed that these conditions are required 
to make up for the losses casters have suf- 
fered by the lightening of patterns, etc. 



In West Bromwich, near Birmingham, 
two ironworks that have been idle for a 
period are to be restarted after modernizing. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not ovet- eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments Used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. W't favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Po'^tnl Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEIM'S 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 6.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



UNION 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 Eaat St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER. B. C, 165 Cordova St., West. P. O. 
Box 1365. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SE.\TTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box «. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St, P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sta., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V4 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTL.^ND. Ore.. 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 674. 



Demand the union label on all products! 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building:, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

L.\ CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA. Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Cnn bp profurod hy seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



"SHANTY" BILL'S DOPE. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



said a word to any one. Don't fergit what 
I tell youse, mate; women's the devil's own, 
an' if I'd a ship o' mc own nary a one of 'em 
should ever set foot on her." 

It is hard to take a prophet lig;hlly whose 
dope seems to he panning out right. Also, 
things hegan to happen which made 
"Shanty" Bill's habitual l-told-you-so ex- 
pression of countenance almost excusable. 
^^Mth the proverbial scorn of her sex for the 
vanquished male, "Pdack-eyed Susan" dis- 
dainfully turned up her pretty little nose at 
the unhappy second mate whenever he tried 
to make himself agreeable to her. In the 
parlance of "bong tong sassciety," she cut 
him dead. To add still more to his cup of 
bitterness she began to take an unusual in- 
terest in the comings and goings of his con- 
queror. She would beam on Evans as she 
had never beamed on "Nathan." When 
Evans was at the wheel or working some- 
w^here aft, she usually drew her chair up 
alongside of him and engaged him in that 
airy, trifling persiflage which passes for con- 
versation among young people of opposite 
sexes. All of which was as gall and worm- 
wood to the crushed spirit of poor "Nathan." 

Things drifted along in this manner for 
several weeks. "Black-eyed Susan" flirted 
outrageously with Evans, who was really a 
nice young fellow. "Nathan" was gloomy 
and morose and gradually acquired a 
strange, menacing .glitter in his pale-blue 
eyes which none of us could exactly fathom. 
His taciturnity was occasionally broken by a 
low, uncanny laugh, the relevance of which 
to anything going on around him was never 
apparent. And all the while "Shanty" Bill 
was looking wise and nodding his head in a 
way to show that things were coming on 
just as hehad expected them to come. 

The Southeast Trades blew with such 
force that most of the time we had to keep 
our to'gallant sails furled. As she was deep- 
loaded, about the only dry place around the 
decks was the after part of the poop. The 
which caused "Tommy," the cat, to take his 
ease on a heap of oakum in the little store- 
room in the after end of the for'ard house 
where "chips" kept his lamps, oils, pitch, 
turpentine and other naval stores. In this 
storeroom there was an air well, sixteen by 
twenty-four inches, built against the for'ard 
bulkhead to within eighteen inches of the 
ceiling, and leading down into the hold. 
Just above it was a little squa'-e scuttle 
hatch through which, in fine weather, we 
used to rig a windsail. 

One dark, blowy night we could hear 
"Tommy" mewing piteously from some- 
where. Investigation showed that he was 
down in the hold, having probably dropped 
down through the air-shaft while listening 
to the squeak of a mouse. 

"Let him stay down there till morning," 
growled "Shanty" Bill, to which the rest of 
us answered, "Sure." 

It was Bill's "gravy-eyed" wheel in the 
morning. Along about three bells he was 
relieved for coffee. While sipping it lie 
said : 

"That there bloody secon' mate's gone 
plum crazy. This mornin' he comes aft to 
me, an' sez he, 'Bill,' sez he, 'how'd you like 
to go to heaven?' I up an' tells him that, 
while I hopes to go there some day, I ain't 
in no sort of hurry about it. An' then he 
laughs that there queer laugh o' his'n an' 
walks awav hunimin' to hisself, 'Ther's a 



land that is fairer than this.' I tell youse 
he's gone off his nut all right, an' all because 
o' that there skirt-rigged craft aft there. I 
don't wish her any harm, but ef I could land 
her in Timbucto, or Chittagong, or some 
other place this very minute, I'll be damned 
ef I wouldn't get busy right away." 

At four bells the second mate sang out: 

"Turn to, there. Git your buckets an' 
brooms an' wash off the poop. Evans, you 
slide down that there air-shaft an' git hold 
o' 'Tommy,' an' I'll lower you down v bucket 
to hoist him up with." 

He spoke in an almost cheerful tone, so 
nuich so, indeed, that "Shanty'' Bill remarked, 
as we went aft : 

"I guess the poor slob is gettin' religious- 
minded. Most o' them there fellers git that 
way when the gell goes back on 'em." 

We had hardly got started scrubbing the 
poop when the startling cry of "Eire, fire," 
rang out from somewhere on the main deck. 
Looking around we saw the cook frantically 
beckoning to us, and pointing to the door- 
way of the little storeroom, through which 
a thick, black volume of smoke was pouring. 

Calling loudly down the after companion 
hatch to the skipper and the mate, we rushed 
down on the main deck. A hasty examina- 
tion of the storeroom showed that all the 
oakum, and most of the pitch and turpen- 
tine, had vanished. The second mate was 
nowhere to be seen ! 

The horrible trutii flashed upon us with 
benumbing force. The love-crazed second 
mate had treacherously inveigled his hated 
rival down into the hold ; had then saturated 
the oakum with kerosene or turpentine, 
lighted it, and dropped the blazing mass 
down the air-shaft. Lastly, with the pecu- 
liar cunning of the insane, he had slidden 
down the shaft himself to make sure that 
the fire was not put out by Evans. 

Even as we stood there, dumfounded by 
the suddenness of the catastrophe, the red 
flames shot up through the air-shaft. And 
there were fifteen tons of dynamite down in 
that hold ! 

"My God, men," shouted the skipper, 
hoarsely, "come on an' back the mainyards, 
an' get the boats over the side. Work for 
your lives now, lads." 

When the danger of violent <leath is as 
imminent as was ours, men will perform 
feats which under ordinary circumstances 
are utterly impossible of accomplishment. 
In less time than it takes to write this we 
had the two boats in the water, and were 
pulling away from the ship's side with all 
the might and main we could bring to bear 
on the oars. 

And none too soon, either. When about 
three cable lengths away from the ship there 
was a terrific detonation. A gigantic pillar 
of smoke, flame and debris rose into the air 
some hundreds of feet, and was blown to 
leeward by the strong trade wind. In ten 
seconds more, all that was visible of the 
stanch ship which had so nobly carried us 
over the seas were a few drifting spars and 
deck-fittings. 

The following morning at daybreak we 
were picked up by an English ship, and two 
days afterward landed in Rio de Janeiro. 
Almost the last words of "Shanty" Bill, from 
whom I there parted, were: 

"P'rcddic, mc boy, take an' ol' fool's ad- 
vice, an' don't you never go shipmates with 
no petticoats again. If you do, Davy Jones 
'11 git the number o' your me.ss as sure's I'm 
a sinner." 



P. S. — Since writing the foregoing I have 

had a letter from an old shipmate, who is 

now in Snug Harbor, in which he says, 

among other things : 

"shanty bill died in the hospittel here last sun- 
day, just afore he croaked some holy joe ladys 
come around visiting like and tliey askt liim if 
he was ready for tlie last voyage, yes hollers bill 
but i don't want no doggon pettycotes to siiip 
along with me beat it girls beat it," 

El Tukrto. 



STORAGE RATE FIXED. 



The coal rate for the last trip and winter 
storage at the Canadian head of the Lakes 
has been fixed at 60 cents, and a number of 
big carriers have been chartered at that 
figure. More capacity is wanted and some 
more tonnage will ])robably be lined up be- 
fore the close of the week. 

With a large amount of coal to go to the 
Canadian Xorthwest before the close of 
navigation and lack of dock facilities at Fort 
William and Port Arthur to take care of 
the business, the shippers will be forced to 
take a large amount of storage capacity. 
Man}' of the vessels that take coal on the 
last trip will have to hold the cargoes. 

The docks at the Canadian ports which 
are being worked to their full capacity are 
from a week to ten days behind, and boats 
in that trade are losing considerable time. 
A big steamer that is at Fort William wait- 
ing for a dock will not get away until Octo- 
ber 5. Some of the coal carriers that will 
follow her will not get any better dispatch. 
Storage coal will be loaded for other ports 
and a number of big carriers have been lined 
up for the last trip. 

Cargoes for early loading are very 
scarce, and a number of wild carriers that 
have been on the market since the first of 
the week have not been placed. In a few 
cases the boats are light and are waiting to 
go to the dock. The big shippers say that 
there is no indication of a change in the 
condition of the market. Contract boats in 
some cases are taking short cargoes. 

The grain freight situation is without 
change all around. A Cleveland steamer 
for prompt loading was chartered recently 
at Fort William for Buflfalo at seven-eights 
of a cent. For tonnage to load a cent is 
being offered. The steainer S. S. Curry will 
load at the latter figure at Duluth to-day. 

Shippers at the head of Lake Superior are 
in the market for storage capacity, but 
they are not making a flat oflfer. Brokers 
say they could probably get 2^ cents if 
they had boats to ofi^cr. but the vessel men 
will not do business at that figure. Some 
grain that was covered ahead at 1^ cents 
to BuiTalo will be shipped before the middle 
of October. 

The ore freight market is very (|uiet and 
that trade will take care of little wild ton- 
nat>c during the balance of the season. 



Vice Consul George B. Stephenson sends 
from Liverpool an English newspaper ac- 
count of a newly invented "direction and 
rotation indicator" for steamships. Fixed 
in the captain's chart room and on the 
bridge it enables him to see at a glance the 
direction and speed of the enginess, and 
number of revolutions per minute. When 
a captain telegraphs "ahead" or "astern" at 
any degree of speed, the indicator gives in- 
stantaneous ocular evidence of the accurate 
carrving out of orders. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Domestic and Naval. 



The schooner Sarah Wood, which 
was towed into Boston on July 30, 
waterlogged, has been condemned and 
stripped. 

The steamship Coronation was 
blown ashore in a gale at Sydney, C. 
R., on October 1. Seven schooners 
shared the same fate. 

The Steamboat Inspection Bureau 
has ruled that a person with only one 
eye is not eligible for renewal of li- 
cense where a visual examination is 
required. 

Charles Dennison Price, a midship- 
man of the cruiser New Orleans, at 
Manila, P. I., committed suicide on 
October 13. Deceased had been or- 
dered to resign. 

President Taft, in a recent speech 
at Portland, Ore., announced his in- 
tention, if in his power, to order the 
battleship Oregon as the first ship to 
pass through the Panama Canal. 

The four-masted schooner Edward 
R. Smith was launched on October 
10 at the shipyard of F. S. Bowker, 
Phippsburg, Me. Captain H. P. T.ewis 
will be the vessel's commander. 

Captain Henry M. Dodge, who was 
master of the schooner Malcolm B. 
Seavey, lost in August off the South 
Carolina coast, has taken command of 
the schooner Edwin R. Hunt, of the 
Deering fleet, of Bath. 

At least one fact has developed be- 
yond controversy in connection with 
the excavation going on inside the 
cofferdam inclosing the wreck of the 
Maine in Havana harbor. That is that 
the ship was not blown up by her 
boilers. 

Replying to a communication from 
the New York and Cuba Mail Steam- 
ship Company, of New York, the 
Steamboat Inspection Bureau has an- 
nounced that menalitt powder can not 
be carried on steamers carrying pas- 
sengers. 

The White Star line announces that 
its triple-screw steamship Laurentic 
will make an extra sailing to the St. 
Lawrence in November to accommo 
date the pre-Christmas traffic. She 
will sail from Montreal and Quebec 
on November 22. 

Orders for three new steamships to 
cost $2,700,000 have been placed by 
the United Fruit Company with 
Workman, Clark & Company of Bel- 
fast. Ireland. Delivery is to be made 
in August, 1912. The vessels will be 
of 8000 tons displacement each, with 
accommodations for ISO passengers. 

The system of towing to be em- 
ployed in operating the locks of the 
Panama Canal is outlined in the speci- 
fications and plans which have been 
prepared in order that bids may be 
asked for on the forty machines, 
which will be required for the locks 
at Gatun, Pedro Miguel and Mira- 
flores. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 350 sail and steam vessels, of 56,- 
217 gross tons, were built in the Uni- 
ted States during the quarter ended 
September 30, 1911. During the cor- 
responding quarter ended September 
30. 1910. 376 sail and steam vessels, 
of 95.137 gross tons, were built in the 
United States. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 92 sail and steam vessels, of 23,- 
282 gross tons, were built in the Uni- 
ted States during September, 1911. 
The largest steam vessel included in 
these figures is the Col. James M. 
Schoonmaker of 8603 gross tons, built 
at Ecorse, Mich., for the Great Lakes 
Engineering Works. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

When in port come up and give us a trial. 
The newest 25-cent house in town. 
New building, new furniture. 
Special attention to mariners. 



FREE BATHS 



Special Weekly 
Rates 



J. II. KLINE, Prop. 



Residenr-*, Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation ScFiool 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 
Mate's and Pilot's License of all 
grades. Ocean, coast and inland 
waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. E. SNELLENBERG, 

Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses. 333 Globe Bldg., First 
Ave. and Madison St., Seattle, Wash. 




^WWW^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^V^^»^^^%A^V>^rfNA^ 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. 0pp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 
— At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 Flrit Avenue, South 

SEATTLE. W.\SH. 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidatea for Haa- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation In all Its 
Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation In a Clear and Intelligent Manner 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor In Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practlre, etc. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave. SEATTLE, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



WW^^S^^*/^^^N^/>^/VWW\^N,-,*>/>*",*"*'>^V>/>^v*>/\,^ 



Seattle, Wa»h., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofllce. letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 

Jacobson, John 
Jensen, H. -1141 
Jensen, John 
Jensen. H. -2014 
Johansen, Ludvlg 
Johanson, Olaf K. 
Johanson, Aug. W. 

-313 
Johanson, O. W. 

-139 
Johnson, John N. 
Johnson, Alf. -1700 
Johnson, Alex. 
Kalning, Jacob 
Karell, J. H. 
Kenny, J. 
Kittelson, C. T. 
Kiesow. P. 
Klrst, H. 
Knappe, Adolf 
Koptze, C. 
Kerwln, W. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kreutz, Karl 
Kroon, Z. 
Larsen, Alfred 
Lathi. J. H. 
Larsen, C. H. 
Lorln, K. 
Lundquist. John 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, O. P. 
Olsen, Bvor 
Olsen. J. H. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olssen, Frank 
Olsen. Erik 
Ommundsen, T. 
Osterberg. Gust. 
Paul. P. G. 
Peterson, Axel -1223 



Andersen, K. E. 
Andersen, J. G. 

-1534 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Boe, E. L. 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlson, C. E. 
Dahlgren, A. 
Derdio, F. 
Dennett, J. 
Kell. Herman 
Elwood, J. 
Ellison. Chas. 
EUifson, Otto 
Elsted. J. 
Erikson, A. -1732 
Krikson, O. -606 
Erikson. Fridbjof 
Krikson. Aug. 
EuRene, J. 
Eager, J. 
Farnan, W. L. 
Fellix, P. 
Felix, L. 
Feeley, T. 
FJelstad. K. M. 
Franzell, A. 
Garbers, G. 
Hansen, C. J. -967 
Hansen. C. -1476 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Haak. C. 
Haga, A. A. 
Han.sen, Harald 
Herman, Axel 
Henrikson, H. -1773 
Holmstrom, C. A. 
Holm, H. P. 
Iverson, Iver 
Ingebretsen, Olaf 
Jacklln. C. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

SeatUe, Wash. 

Vernon W. Buck Arthur C. McL.uie 

Carl G. Hen.-ion 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Praetors in Admiralty. 

I'rec Advirc- to Seamen. 

764-5-6 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifv;i dc norclisk.i spra;ig. 

K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 

My Work Is My Best Advertisement 

W. H. MIDDLETON 

TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON. Cutter 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In Every 

Garment 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three doors south of James, SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13 



Peterson. C. V. -644 
Petterson. O. -710 
I'eterson, E. -668 
Relme. T. 
Relnink. H. 
Relnhold, A. 
Ruunak, H. 
Scetveit. J. 
Saar. J. 
Samuelsen. A. R. 

-732 
Scott, Alf. 
Scarabosio, M. 
Schultz, Wm. 



Scliafer, P. 
Satto, S. 
Stor, W. T. 
Suomlnen, Alex. 
Swenson, L. G. 
Swanson, Gus 
Stor, W. 
Thocke, E . 
'i'ollefsen, Andrew 
Tergersen, Kasper 
Turner, T. 
Wilde, H. 
Zechel, W. 
Zwahlen, R. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

Brewed by 
HUMBOLDT BREWING CO. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider. Syrups, SarsaparlUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cat. 

A. R. ABHAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLFF KARLSEN. Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second Street 



Eureka, Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Bror Utter, a native of Bornhus, 
Gefle, Sweden, last heard from in 
New York, in 1905, is inquired for by 
his parents. Address, Maskinisten 
Utter, Bornhus, Sweden. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: 

Gust Leyrle, arrived at Philadelphia, 
October 2, 1908, on ship Dirigo. 

Gustav Mattson and Victor Wilson, 
on schooner Charles Davenport. 
M.irch. 1911. 

John McCauIey, whose brother 
Cyrus McCauIey (late of barge Har- 
risburgh) died in Marine Hospital, 
Philadelphia, on May 17, 1911. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI &t CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 
Groceries and Notions 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 



Stand: 
At Sailors' Union Office 



Phone 691 

ABERDEEN, WASH 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen 

Trade with JUKKA SAHLSTEIN. 
New store. Everything is new and sold 
at right prices. 304 South F St., near 
Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen, Wash 



SMOKE 
THE RED SEAL CIGAR 

GRAND CIGAR STORE 

300 S. F. St., in front of Sailors' 

Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 
around the corner from the Union OfHce. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEGE- 
TABLES. Shipping supplied at lowest 
rates. Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Prea. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Waterman ® Katz 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Complete stock of Ship Candlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, Etc., Etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Goods, Clothlnfl, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



. . »S[PH880t 

Issued by AutHoril^ofute Ciga/ MaKers' IntefnaUonal UnlotTorAmerica 

Union-made Cigars. 

<Ihi$ (f ntifif^. 'M U< a«m omaiMil Inuiis Vb Mtc bem mH bya lUSt-CbSS Wnia 
1 MUKR OF THE ClOMt MMEn 'HITUJUTIONU. liNIOM « Hmtckt. in tntliabm devoted hthtid- 
wnnienl of IliE HORAl MATtKlAlindllimillJlUI WLLIAUor nUOlMT. Ihtitionmitanaai 
ttes* Cuttn U) til smAan (jHMlwut th« worU 

il WruigiaMU upon Ibu labtJ w be pumsbad MCarding tolML 



F>C 

' siaiLE 










OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

Hfl. MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters. Hats. Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins. Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls. 75c; Hickory Shirts, 60c. 
Everything Union made. I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 
Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall 2320 N. 30th Street, Old Town 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WorKingmen's Store 

Importer and Dealer In 
Fine Custom and Ready-Made Clothing 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats. Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Clothing, 
Trunks, Valises, Etc. 

ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

23 N. Third Street Near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

OtTice: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

Wanted 

By the United States Bureau of Labor, 
Washington, D. C, the following num- 
bers of the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Volumes 1 to 4 
Volume 5, Nos. 2, 20, 22, 27, 30 
Volume 6, Nos. 14, 17, 20, 31, 
45, 46, 48 

Anyone having any of the numbers 
indicated above will please communi- 
cate with the United States Bureau of 
Labor, Washington, D. C. 



V^^^V^^^^^^^^^^^N^^tf^*S/S^^S/V-S^V^^S^V^.^V^'>^^^ 



RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 

GO TO THE 

Union Cigar Store 

For Your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 

MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 
Seattle, Wash. 



Areas, Chas. 
Barbo, M. 
Barnett, H. 
Bergstrom, F. 
Bradley. A. J. 
Bushby, Mr. 
Bonnell, H. 
Brown, F. C. 
Brownlee, Tom 
Connolly, Tom 
Chivers, L. 
Engstrom, Swan 
Flores, Augstlne 
Grace, Richard 
Giradelli, A. 
Hanlon, Jack 
Hedger, A. 
Laugan, Jas. 
Law, Willie 
Lawson, John 



Morris, Ernest 
Morgan, H. E. 
Morgan, L. 
Morris, John 
Moyes, Andrew 
Murphy, E. M. 
McCall, Wm. 
O'Farrell, Jas. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Parrott, I. 
Pierce, Claude 
Stacey, Frank 
Stollery, Joe 
Stevens, Jas. 
Stevenson, J. 
Tillbury, H. 
Tinoco, Joe 
Taylor, W. 
Vanhear, Jas. 
Van Ermen, H 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Building, San Francisco, wants for 
the relatives in question, information 
regarding: 

Carl Jensen, born March 13, 1877, 
in Troelstrup, near Haslev, Denmark. 
Mr. Jensen has been a member of the 
Sailors' Union and was in 1907 on 
board the schooner Henry Nelson. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Carl Sofus Frandzen, born in Co- 
penhagen, February 11, 1881. Left 
Denmark in 1901; employed in United 
States Navy, 1902. His father wants 
to get into communication. 

Jesper Christian Jespersen, who has 
been a member of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific up to 1900. Has been 
employed on various life-saving sta- 
tions on the Pacific Coast and later 
on sailed a scow on the San Fran- 
cisco Bay. His brother in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

George Ulrich Rune, whose ad- 
dress in 1909 was care of Sailors' 
Union Hall, Tacoma, Wash. His 
father in Denmark wants to get in 
communication with him. 

William Ernst Ludvig Hansen, 
called W.. E. Hansen, a native of Co- 
penhagen, Denmark. Mr. Hansen was 
in 1907 in the employ of the Alaska 
Packers' Association at Karluk, Alas- 
ka. Since then nothing has been 
heard of him. His sister in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

Jens Peder Lauritz Pedersen, ma- 
rine engineer and fireman, born in 
Dalby, near Thureby, Denmark, April 
14, 1878, and supposed to have ar- 
rived in San Francisco in the winter 
of 1907-8, is inquired for by the Da- 
nish Consulate, 815 Mills Bldg., San 
Francisco. Cal 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



An incipient revolution in Hon- 
duras, headed by Jesus Ulloa was ef- 
fectiveli' crushed recently, according 
to advices from Puerto Cortez. 

The Italians bombarded the forts 
at Tripoli on October 3 and afterward 
landed a force. The Turks withdrew 
from the town. 

The cruiser Yahagi, the newest ad- 
dition to the Japanese navy, was 
launched at Nagasaki on October 3. 
The vessel is of 14,991 tons. 

There was a "cheaper food" riot di- 
rected against the Jews at Warsaw on 
October 2. Three Jews and two 
Christians were wounded. The police 
quickly restored order. 

Two hundred and forty lives are 
known to have been lost from coast- 
ing craft during the storm of October 
1 off the coast of Holland. More than 
100 bodies have been washed ashore. 

The Corinth Canal Company has 
decided to close the canal to both 
Turkish and Italian vessels <luring 
the war. Tliis canal connects the 
Gulf of Corinth with the Aegean Sea. 

The Dutch steamer Ixion, from Ba- 
tavia for Liverpool, has been burned 
near Engano. an island off the west 
coast of Sumatra. The steamer's 
crew, numbering twenty-live, took to 
the boats. 

The British steamer Martfield was 
in collision in the North Sea on 
October 2 with the British steamer 
Glasgow, and sunk. All the members 
of the Hartfield's crew, lunnbering 
about twenty men, were drowne<l. 

The Portuguese Republicans have 
dispatched 8,000 soldiers to Northern 
Portugal to watch the frontier and 
to re-establish the telegraph wires 
which were cut by the Monarchists. 
The latter claim to be gaining ground 
in the effort to re-establish the mon- 
archy. 

American missionaries at Cheng- 
tu, the recently besieged capital of 
Sze Chuen province, estimate that 
10,000 persons were killed during the 
fighting between the insurgents and 
the Government troops. Of the dead, 
2000 were soldiers and the others 
rebels. 

The Italian autlioritics at Tripoli 
on October 8 issued a proclamation 
suppressing slavery. Tripoli was the 
only remaining port on the coast of 
Africa where slavery still prevailed, 
notwithstanding the efforts of Great 
Britain and France to prevent the 
traffic. 

Determined to know why the Gov- 
ernment paid Gustavo Madero, a 
brother of the President-elect. 642,195 
pesos, and what it has cost to muster 
out the revolutionary forces, the Mex- 
ican Chamber of Deputies on October 
11 called upon President de la Barra 
for an accounting. 

At a meeting in the Mosc|ue of St. 
.S()j)liia, Constantinople, on October 6. 
a telegram of protest against Italy's 
declaration of war on Turkey was 
formulaled and sent to all the par- 
liaments of the world, peace and arbi- 
tration societies, universities, socialist 
organizations and The Hague peace 
tribunal. 

Joseph Bell, the eminent .Scottish 
surgeon, who was the original of the 
character of Sherlock Holmes, died 
on October 5 at Mauricewood, Milton 
bridge, Midlothian. He was born in 
lulinburgh in 1837, and was an in- 
structor of Conan Doyle at Edin- 
burgh University. His hobby was the 
study of mysterious crimes. 



14 



■ COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The death rate of New York City 
for the first week of October was the 
lowest ever recorded, reaching 12.60 
per 1000. 

President Taft, in a speech at Bel- 
lingham. Wash., on October 9, pre- 
dicted the opening of the Panama 
Canal to traffic on July 1, 1913. 

President Taft, at San Francisco on 
October 14, broke ground for the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition, to be 
opened in 1915. 

The Federal Government won its 
suit against the so-called bathtub trust 
in a decision of the United States 
Circuit Court at Baltimore on October 
13. 

Seven persons were killed and twen- 
ty-one injured, four of them seriously, 
in a collision between a Missouri Pa- 
cific passenger train and a fast freight 
train near Omaha, Neb., on Octo- 
ber 15. 

The cost of living in the United 
.States has been going down during 
the last five or six weeks, according 
to the figures compiled by the mer- 
cantile agencies at New York City. 

Two bodies were recovered from 
the flood wreckage at .Austin, Pa., on 
October 12. This makes the total 
number of bodies recovered seventy, 
out of seventy-four supposed to be 
missing. 

Amid scenes of vvild enthusiasm the 
flag of the Chinese revolutionists was 
raised in the Chinese quarter of Hon- 
olulu, T. M., on October 14, follow- 
ing the publication of reports of the 
progress of the revolt. 

The plan for the dissolution of the 
American Tobacco Company, in com- 
pliance with the decision of the United 
States Supreme Court, was made pub- 
lic on October 14. The trust will be 
divided into four separate companies. 

The Borden Ministry of Canada 
was sworn in on October 10 by the 
Governor-General. The oath of the 
Privy Council and that assigning to 
the departments were administered by 
Earl Grey in person. 

The criminal cases against more 
than a score of firms and individuals 
alleged to be in the bathtub trust will 
come up at the November term of 
the Federal Court at Detroit. All the 
defendants have pleaded not guilty. 

The United States Supreme Court 
convened on October 9 after a four- 
months' recess. It will remain in ses- 
sion until the last of May and will 
consider as many of the 800 cases 
now on the docket as the conditions 
will permit. 

.Associate Justice John M. Harlan, 
of the United States Supreme Court, 
died at Washington, D. C, on Octo- 
ber 14, after a brief illness, aged 78 
years. He was the oldest member of 
the Court, having served thirty-three 
years, ten niontlis and twenty-five 
days. 

A VN'oman Suffrage amendment to 
the Constitution of California was 
adopted by a majority of several thou- 
sand at a special election on October 
10. Twenty-two other amendments, 
including Initiative and Referendum, 
Recall and Workmen's Compensation 
were also adopted by large majorities. 
.An order from Washington paroling 
John R. Walsh, the former Chicago 
banker and railway president, was re- 
ceived at the Federal penitentiary at 
Leavenworth, Kas., on October 14. 
Walsh up to the time of his parole 
had served one year, eight months 
and twenty- six days of his five years' 
sentence. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sallora' 
Union OfDce are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Aass, Oscar 
Abhors, Arne 
.Adolfsson. Fritz 
Aga, Johan 
Ahloff, W. 
Alirens, W. 
.\lbrecht, Kmll 
Albertson, Chris 
Amundsen, Albert 
Anders, Frledrich 
Andersen, Adler 
Andersen, Carl L. 
Andersen, Christian 
Andersen, -992 
Andersen, Aksel 
Andersen, Peder 
Andersen, Nils 
Anderson, Anders 
Anderson, E. B. 
Anderson, A. 

B.Tardsen, Tellef 
Baardsen, S. 
Bacltlund, John 
liaardscn, George 
Balda, Alfonse 
Bau, Martin 
Bauke, H. 
Baunian. Chas. 
Bausback, E. 
BcausanK, E. 
BeiiKtsson, -1924 
Benthien. Wm. 
Benson, -1765 
Benson, J. 
Bentzen, Bent 
Berg, H. J. 
Benson, Chas. 
Bergcjuist, C. 
Berlin, Adolph 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Bjornsen. Conrad 
Bladen, Pete 
Blpcha. Alfons 

Caen, P. 

Campbell. Martin 
Carlsen, Martin 
Carlsen, C. W. 
Carlsen, John 
Carlson, R. 
Carlson, F. 
Carlson, Mr. 
Carson, Chas. 
Causon, Harry C. 
Ceelan, John 
Christiansen, Fred. 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Chri.stensen, Sigwald 

Dahler. Peter 
Day, H. E. 
Deans, Taff 
Deegan, John 
iJiller, Edw. 
Doense, -30R 
I>olimann, Fred 
Dosl, Theo. K. 

Rck. Chas. 
Ekendalil, Waino 
Ekwall. Gust. A. 
Elfstrom, A. 
Ellis. W. W. 
Eliassen, C. 
Eliassen. Sigurd 
Engelman, G. 
Engdahl. F. 
Engstrom, M. R. 



Anderson. Ole 
Anderson. Martin 
Anderson. K. E. 
Anderson. -1240 
Anderson. -1420 
Anderson. -1520 
Andersson, -1215 
Andresen, Anton 

-1635 
Antell, Fred 
Antonsen, -1768 
Antonsen, Mariu.s 
Apostolakos, Peter 
Aronsen, Halfdan 
Asnry, Chas. 
Asp. Gust L. 
Axelsen, Axel 
Aylward, Jas. 
Azinl, Giuseppe 

Bodahl, Hans O. 
Bohm, Emit 
Bonamie, J. 
Boe. Carl R. 
Boers, M. 
Bohm, Emil 
Boldt, Chr. 
Bolt, Tony 
Borg, Antonio 
Boye, H. H. 
Brams, Carl S. 
Brandsten, Ernst 
Bredesen, Johan 
Breekke, Hans 
Broders, Hajo 
Brose, Dick 
Bryning. Wm. 
Brvde, Karl M. 
Brun, Axel -1839 
Burton, Chester 
Burmelster, John 
Busford, D. R. 



Christensen. -1095 
Christensen. -1332 
Christensen, Olaf 
ChristoffcTsen, C. W 
Clausen. J. 
Clausen, Chr. 
Clyde, H. R. 
Collins. T. W. 
Corty, Caesar 
Crangle, Jas. 
Creijg, Enriques 
Cross, Leander D. 
Cunningham. An- 
drew 

Doyle, Wm. 
Dracar, Edgardo 
Drager. Otto D. 
Dunn, C. W. 
Durholt, Hugo 
Duval, Bernard 
Duvel, Wilhelm 

Ericson. E. R. 
Erlcksen, L. H. 
Eriksen. Edward 
Ericksen, Brick 
Erickson, Victor 
Erie, Andrew 
Espersen, Anton 
Espeland, August 
Evensen. John 



Fasig, Don 
Fischer, Wilhelm 
Fisher, H. H. 
Fisher, Torsten 
Fjeldstad, Olaf 
Folvik, L. C. 

Gabrielsen, EUing 
Gaede, W. 
Garvin. F. 
Garden, Joe 
Georgensen, A. 
Gerdeh, J. A. 
Glbbs, H. D. 
Glesen. Billy 
Gilling, John 
Gjardahl. Soren 
Glase, Gust 
Gonda, Cornelius 

Haas. Oscar 
Haagensen, M. 
Hafke, Peter 
Hagglund, Chas. 
Haier, Fred. 
Hakansson, Axel 
Hakansson, Ingvar 
Hamniargren, Oscar 
Hana. O. O. 
Hannus. Alex 
Hannus. Peter 
Hansen. -1969 
Hansen, -968 
Hansen, Ole D. 
Hansen, Walter 
Hansen, Carl -1910 
Hansen, Hans F. 
Hansen, Bernat 
Hansen, John 
Hansen. Olaf 
Hansen, -1746 
Hansen, -2177 
Hansen, -2124 
Hanson, Anton 
Hanson, H. C. 
Hansson. Chas. G. 
Hartung, Richard 
Haug. H. H. 
Heggstrom, H. 
Heggebo, I. 
Hein, M. 
Iversen. Sigwald B. 

Jackson, John 
Jacobs, G. C. 
Jacobsen, Edward 
Jacobsen, Otto J. 
Jakobsen. Joakim 
.lakobsen, Ole 
Jausson. Frederick 
Jenssen, J. 
Jensen, P. F. 
Jensen, John 
Jensen. Hans -2014 
Jepson, Nela 



Forberg. Alex. 
Foster, Mr. 
Frank. Bernard 
Freiberg, P. 
Fuss. Henr.v 

Gower. Jolin 
Griffin, Jim 
Gronman, Karl 
Gronholm, W. 
Guger, August 
Gundersen. Krlstlan 
Gundersen, John 
Gusjaas, Oscar 
Gustafsen. Gust. 
Gusjaas, Oskar 
Guttenberg, Gus. 

Hein, F. 
Heino, S. 
Heinaz, C. 
Heinlg, Johann 
Helenius, Oskar 
Helmros, G. 
Heltwood. A. S. 
Hengst, Otto 
Henderson. Hans 
Henriksen. Andreas 
Henriksen, Otto 
Henriksen. -1737 
Hermansen. -1622 
Hermansen, Fritz 
Hetman. Walter 
Hilling, Albert 
Hinck, John 
Hofgaard. Hans 
Hogan, Jim 
Holmes, Alex. 
Holmes. Gus 
Holmstrom, Harry 
Holstein. Rudolf 
Hoseth, August 
Housman, H. J. 
Housler, Otto 
Hubertz. Emil 
Huishneek, W. 
Humphrey. W. P. 
Hunt. Thos. 
Husche. Henry 



Johnson, John 
Johnson, J. M. 
Johnson, -1300 
Johansen, Chas. 
Johansen, H. C. 
Johanson, -880 
Johanson, -1908 
Johanson, -1620 
Johansson. -1856 
Johansson, John 
Johansson. E. R. 
Johnson, G. Alb. 



Jefferson, Victor 
Jelman, J. 
Jensen, P. 
Jensen, Hans -2062 
Jewers. Frank 
Johnson, Julius 

Kaasik, A. 
Kallas, Aug. 
Ivallas, Martin 
Kallasinan, Edward 
Kallberg, Arvid 



Karl berg, 


Karl Alf 


Karlsson, 


Oscar, 


-1399 




Karlsson, 


Karl J. 


Kelly, T. 


F. 


Kelly, W 


E. 


Kernup, 


Edward 


Keskula, 


John 


Kielman, 


Joe 


Kihlnian, 


Charles 


Kin say, Wm. 


Kleblngat, F. 


King, Harry 


Kittelsen 


I^auntz 



Dang, Axel E. 
Darsen, Anders 
Darsen, Klaus L. 
L,arscn, -1550 
I,arsen, Charles E. 
Larsen, F. A. 
Larsen, Ingvard 
Darsen, Chr. S. 
Larsen, John -1643 
Darsen, Herman 
Larsen, Klaus 
Larssen, Soren M. 
Larson, Karl 
Larson, Max 
Latham, T. H. 
Lauritzen, E. J. D. 
r.,eeberg, Gustaf 
Leighthott, Chas. 

Maatson, Olot 
Madson, Thorolf 
Magnusson, Gust. 
Magnusson, C. G., 

-691 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Magnusson, G. W. 

-1147 
Majuri, -1912 
Mallenin, Chas. 
Marin, Joe 
Martin, Howard 
Martinusen, Olaf 
Martinsen. K. -1721 
Markmann, Heinrich 
Mathson, Mauritz 
Matson, Johannes 
Mattson, William 
Mattson. J. M. 
McCull, James 

Nedberg, August 
Nelsen, Ed. -1044 
Nelson, Carl W. 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nessenberg, Frl. 
Nielsen, Wm. 
Nielsen, -1072 
Nielsen, Kris. F. V. 

C. 
Niederracher, L. 



Johnsson, Herman 
Jones, H. 
Jordt, Peter -1737 
Jordfald, Th. 
Jorgensen, Joh.in 

Knudsen, Matthias 
Kohne. Ernest 
Konkila, Jolian 
Kopperstad, O. 
Kilkeny, M. F. 
KJarsgaard, Hans 
Krane, Anton 
Kralvik. O. 
Kreft, Paul 
Kristensen. Marius, 

-1088 
Kristlansen, K. S. 
Kristansen, -1355 
Krotcliin, H. 
Kuhlman, Wm. 
Kumel, K. 
Kumlander, E. 
Kupper. Alfred 
Kylander, Herman 

Lepsoe, Oscar 
Lersten, J. O. 
Lewenson, John 
Lind, Chas. 
Lind, W. 
Lindholm, E. A. 
Lindroth, E. 
Lindgren. Chas. 
Linder, Chas. 
Litalien, Gust. 
Ljungberg, Herman 
Long, Robert 
Loughlln, M. J. 
Luckman, E. 
Lude, Thorwald 
Ludvigsen, A. -1249 
Luhrs, L. -1179 
Lundstrom, T. 

McKenzie, Jas. 
McKenzie, Duncan 
McKenna, Barny 
Mehrtens. Herman 
Meidell, John 
Mersman, L. 
Meskell, Mat. 
Meyer, Otto 
Meyer, Erwin 
Mikklesen, Alf. 
Miller, Walt. 
Mlsterman, Paul 
Moe, John 
MoUer, Nels 
Moller, Hans 
Moore, Wm. 
Morse, Harry W. 
Muir, F. W. D. 
Muller, John 



O'Neill, Jas. 


O'Daly, John 


Olavsen. Christian 


Olmann, P. 


Olsen, 


A. P. 


Olsen, 


-1187 


Olsen, 


H. -478 


Olsen, 


H. -1169 


Olsen, 


John A. 


Olsen. 


BilUe 


Olsen, 


Chas. 


Olsen, 


O. 


Olsen, 


Olaf D. 



Packham, J. 
Pactlaw. Edw. H. 
Pagel, B, 
Palmer, Joseph 
Paludan, Chas. 
Papeijoglon, Con- 

stantinon 
Paul, Peter G. 
Pearson, N. F. 
Pearson, John 8. 
Pearson, S. 
Pearson, O. T. 
Pedersen, Laurits 
Pekman, Ernest 
Pendville, N. 
Persson, A. F. 
Persson, M. F. 
Perlsen, N. 
Petersen, Harry 
Petersen, Gert 
Petersen, H. A. R. 
Petersen, Berthel 
Petersen, N. -1235 



Nilsen, Hendrik 
Nilsen, Ingvald 
Nilsen, Alfonse 
Nilson. N. 
Nilson. Albt. 
Nllsson, C. M. 
Nolan, John 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norris, Edward 
Norris, N. A. 

Olsen, O. S. -1123 
Olsen, O. E. -991 
Olsen, S. -1119 
Olson, Blrger 
Olson, G. B. 
Olson, G. F. -562 
Olson, Hans 
Olson, O. H. 
Olsson. Carl G. -1101 
Opperman. Wm. 
Osell, Teddy 
Osterman. Oscar 
Ozard, Wm. 

Petersen, Oscar 
Petersen, C. L. 
Petersen, Meier 
Pettersen, S. A. 
Peterson, Johan 
Peterson, S. 
Peterson, J. -1138 
Peterson, L. 
Peterson, Victor 
Petterson, H. A. 
-1154 

Peterson, W. A. 
Peterson, Otto 
Petterson, Victor 

-1447 
Phillips, Max 
Phillips, Geo. 
Pierce, Jno. 
FMetschman, Gfo. 
Pletlte, Th. 
Pihplck, Ch. 
Pommer, John 
Prlede, Wm. 



Wagner, W. -1071 
Walsh. Michael J. 
Walters. A. B. 
Wanack, M. 
Wash, Henry 
Waterloo, T. 
Waunquist, E. 
Welin. Herman 
Westman, A. 
Wesch, Henry 
Wesic, Gustav 
Wiberg, John 
Young, Peter 
Zimmerling, F. 
Zillig, Albert 



Wikstrom, Emil 
Wlliberg, Karl 
Willman. -1020 
Wills, George 
Willartz. Fred 
Wilson, A. B. 
Wilhclnison. S. 
Wold, Olaf 
Wucst, Walter 
Wug, Frank G. -1241 
Wunstorf, Aug. 

Ysarngeio, Za. 
Ziepke, Fiitz 
Zoe, Frank 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



.\aga, Johan 
.\lbrecht, Emil 
.\ndrf'sen, Anton 
Baisieux, M. 
Balda. Alfonso 
Becker, Chas, 
Dyrness, L. E. 
ICdwardsen, Louis 
Eliason, C. 
Espersen, Anton 
Fasig. Dan 
Gustafson. K. O. 
Haggar, F. 
Hannus, Alex. 



Johnson, John U. 

-2161 
.lohansen. John 
Ludviksen. Arne 
Malmin. 'I'homas 
McPherson, Peter 
Nilsen, Ingvald 
Pearson, J. T. 
Sjoblom. Carl 
Seiren. Alfred -2443 
Thoresen. Theodor 
Thilo. Peter 
Winblad, M. 
Wilson, John C. -642 



Hartmere, C. -1245 Wahl, Robert 
Johannsen. Carsten 

Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, A. Dewandoski. Andrew 

Almeida. J. C. Laine, A. W. 

Aalto, Almo Larson, Christ. 

Aken, Emil Lehtonen, John 

Aleksandersen, Halv Lindgaad, John 
Andersen, -1119 Lundberg, John 

.Andersen, Emil Lindroos, A. W. 

Andprsen, Andrew Lorentzen, Ernst 
Andersen, Olaf -1118 Lundberg, H. 
Anderson. Martin Lundberg, C. 



Svend 



Anderson 

Hugo 
-Anderson, John 
.Anderson, G. A. S. 
-Anderson. Frank 
Ando. J. G. 
Bastian. Wm. 
Baxter. W. J. 
Benoit, Dewail 
Benson, Charles 
Bergland, A. 
Bianca, F. 
Bohm. August 
Bodahl. Hans -1746 
Buve, Anton 
Callow, A. W. 
Christensen, Hans 

Chrosthonsen, Harry O'Neill. Frank J. 
I>avis. J. Olsen, Olaf T. 

Kricksen, A. Paul, Peter 

Evensen. Andrew A. Pista, J. 
Fardig, Wm. Pettersson. -1065 

Flother. James G. Petersen. -1093 
Gunderson, Andreas Perdtes, John 
Gunderson, Krlstian Petersen, Frank A 
draff. Otto Price, Thurman 

Gilbert, A. Rasehtun, Franz 

Orafft. Otto Ra-stnussen, -341 

Gustafson, Wicktor Rasniu.ssen. -485 
Gundersen. Andrew Rasmuss. Peter 
Hansen, O. Reitter, F. 

Hansen, J. T. Rentern, Axel 

Hansen, Jack Rossbeok, Gust 

Hanssen, Ernest Rustanius, John 



Larsen, Andrew 
Levander, Ernest 
Laas, J. 
Muller, R. 
Moris. Oeon R. 
Mattlson, J. M. 
Mesketh, Robert 
Molher, S. D. 
Morse, H. W. 
Mehent, T. 
Nass, F. M. 
Nel.son, Jack 
Nil.son, H. 
Olson, Waldem.ar 
Olsson, p:rnest -966 
Opperman, Wm. 
Olsen, -966 



Hanson, Henry 
Haraldson, JoFin 
Haraldson, -874 
Henig, .1. 
Heyke, F. 
Hvid. Hans 
Holm, Carl 
Hooley. Alex 
Hubner, H. 
Hardlof. Sigurd 
Helander, J. E. 
Hansen, John 
Hansen. Andreas 
Ho.seth. Krlstian 
Haaversen, Otto 
Haraldsen. John 
Hansen, ll.ans B. 
Jacobson, P. J. 
Jansson, l-rouis 



Rasmussen, N. C. 
Rasinussen. S. -128 
Sansflber, Paul 
Saniuelsen. Ingwald 
Schnlder, Henrlch 
Smith. J. S. 
Svedstrup, E. F. 
Skattel, A. 
Seidel, Willy 
Sindahl, Jens 
Stange, Fritz 
Svendsen, E. 
Svenson. Bernard 
Syvertsen, H. 
Summers, James 
Swanson, Carl 
Toosen, Carlos 
Tohn. Robert 
Tervakalli. S. A. 



Jenson, John Frank Thomas, Henry 



Quarnstrom, Alex. 
Ramberg, B. 
Rasmussen, -525 
Rasmusen, -497 
Rasmussen. Peter 
Rasmussen, Oscar 
Redmond, Mr. 
Reed. W H. 
Reek, John A. 
Renf, Niel 
Reuter, Ernest 
Reutern. Axel 
Rlgnell, J. 

Saar, F. A. 
Saalman. Joseph 
Saftstrom, Niels 
Sahlit, E. 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Sandstrom. Ivar 
Sanderfeld, Fred 
Saul. Th. 
Schall. Carl 
Schroder, Paul 
Srhluter, Paul 
Schmidt, Hans 
Sfhecl. Carl 
Schuster, Jacob 
Scott, Emil G. 
Selin, -1565 
Sexon, Chas. 
Sjogren, John 
SJolund, Henry. 
Sjostrom, Gus. 

Teras, John 
Tervakalllo, G. A. 
Theorin, J. E. 
Thomasson, Andee 
Thompsen, Peter 
Thorsen, Arthur 
Thomas, Henry 
Ulappa, K. 
Ulbrand. Wm. 
lUni. Gustave 
Valentine, Geo. 
Valens, John 
Van Poelyen, P. 
Venema, Harry 



Qulnn, Wm. 
Roaldson, F. E. 
Robsham, W. 
Roose, Otto 
P.Rost. Chas. 
Rosenwold, I. 
Reinhold, Arvid 
Reinhold. Ernst 
Rosenthal, J. 
Rustamus, Julius 
Ryerson. Geo. 
Rytko. Otto 

Smith, Johan 
Smith, Max 
Sommer, J. 
Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Soler, Emanuel 
Sorger, G. M. E. 
Sorensen, N. M. 
Soto, Santos 
Starr, T. 
Steen, Hilmar 
Stenlund, John 
Stettenberg, Einar 
Stimsen, Harold 
Sullivan, Jerry L. 
Svane. A. 
Svanson, Chas. 
Svanson. S. G. 
Svenson, Peder -2209 
Svensson, L. G. 
Swanson, Ovel 

Thomson, G. E. 
Tillman, Chas. 
Tompson, Gunvald 
Topel, Fred. 
Trentani, Louis 
Tscheekar, F. 



Johnsson, C. A. 

Johnsson. -A. -1874 

Johnson, Chas. 

Johansen, Fritz 

Johanson, Carsten- 

Johnson. P. T. 

Julian, A. B. 

.faiohsen. Peder J. 

Johanson. Andrew 
! .lohanson, E. A. 
j Karlsson, A. M. 
i Kjelman, Joe 

KJar-sgaard, Hans 

Klahee, Kawe 

Klobu, Kave 

Koikin, F. 

Krauzer, Otto 

Klahn. K. 

Kumlander, Emil 
[ Klahn, K. 

Kumlander. M. E. 

ALASKA 



Thomas, F. S. 
Thorsen, Chas. 
Tillman. Chas. 
TTlappa, K. 
Uidall, Hans 
Woldhouse, John 
Weehauf, Henrv 
Wiljanen, W. V. 
Wuest, Walter 
Zorner, Chas. 
Zebrowski, P. 

PACKAGES 
Berge, John 
Hansen, John 
Julius, P. 
Lehtinen. Kaarlo 
Pedersen. Peder 
Polison. Tom 
Svendson. Edelmond 
LTggla, Fred. 

FISHERMEN. 



San Francisco. 



Upplt, w. 
Ursin, Jno. 

Vireck, A. H. F. 
Vis, Jacob 
Voightlander, Felix 



Aaa-s, O.secar 
-Aiillo. Francesco 
-Anderson, Isaac 
-\nderson, John 
Anderson, John E. 

-305 
Ballod. P. 
Beonhard. Oscar 
Bona, VInce 
Bruno, Antonino 
Cardinale. Frank 



Dahmeyer. Herman 
Leiandro, Andrea 
T-exa, N. 
Dombardo, Nene 
Lunde, Ole 
McCormack, J. 
McGuinnes. Wni. 
Mercurio. Giuseppe 

D. 
Montalbano. Do- 

mlnico 



Cardinale. CJiuseppe Nelson. -Ax 
Cardinale. Salvatore Nielsen. Johan 



("arino. Rosario 
Catardo. A. 
Conte. Pietro L. 
Conte. Salvatore L. 
Daiigelo. N. 
Del Monte. J. D. 
F.vala. Francisco 
CJardoh. August 



Nielsen, Karl E. 
Nowakowskl. Mase 
Olsen. Nick 
Orlando. Mercurio 
Partinico. Salvatore 
Perea, George 
Rasmussen, Alfred 
Rann, 



Giuseppe, Lombardo Rngeness. George 



Fcrrante, Piazio 
H.igen. George L. 
Hardy. George 
Iversen, Olaf 
.lohannesen, Johan 
Kempf, Chas. 

Astoria 



Russo. .Antonio 
Salvatore, Lombardo 
Scrl.t. Pitlro 
Tiller. E. 
Wil.sgoard. iMniel 



Beck. Johannes 
Johnson. A. .7. 
Koehler. Albert 
Kure, Gedius. -263 
Jyarson. John R. 
Male, Ole Olsen 
Peterson, Edward 
-499 



Rlskc, Welkke -295 
Holmberg, O. B. 

631 
Knutsen, Alfred -261 
Karl-son. Wilhelm 
Lauberg, A. 
Marlinten, l.""redrik 
Swedbeig. Emil 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and MarVcets $ts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (THE GERMAN BANK) Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $ 1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,605,792.68 

Employees' Pension Fund 113,473.47 

Deposits June 30th. 1911 44,567,705.83 

Total Assets 47,173,498.51 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post 
Office, or Express Co.'s. Money Orders, 
or coin by Express. 

OflBce Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; 
First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; Sec- 
ond Vice-President and Manager, George 
Tourny; Third Vice-President, J. W. Van 
Bergen; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secre- 
taries, G. J. O. Folte and Wm. D. New- 
house; Goodfellow, Eells & Orrick, Gen- 
eral Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, 
Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, J. W. Van 
Bergen, Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, F. 
Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission Street, 
between 21st and 22nd Streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 
Clement Street, between 5th and 6th Ave- 
nues. For receipt and payment of De- 
posits only. W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. OfHce open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 FOLSOM STREET 

Near Third Street 

100 all sunny furnished rooms. Elec- 
tric light, hot and cold water. Rates, 
25c to 75c per day, $1.50 to $3.00 per 
week. Baths. Phone Home J 4230. Open 
all night. 



PATRONIZE HOIVIE INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 

Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia— All Union Made 

I'nlon Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Rf-low 5th, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 19««; Home J-19M 



„SONNER AV NORGE ' 

,,Henrlk Ibsen" Loge No. 7 
San Francisco 
Moter hver Fredagaften Kl 8, 1 Vet- 
erans' Hall, 431 Duboce Ave. 

Medlemskontingent $1: per Maaned: 
Sykebldrag $10: per Uke. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Union Label 
Goods 

This store is headquarters for Men's 

furnishing goods bearing the UNION 

LABEL. 

Shirts with the UNION LABEL. 

Collars with the UNION LABEL. 

Neckties with the UNION LABEL. 

Suspenders with the UNION LABEL. 



Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite Stb 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION tlATS 

Eureka, Cal., Letter Liat. 



Alexander, G. L. 
Bensen, S. 
Christensen, Ole 

Martin 
Christensen, Harvy 
Farrell, Henry D. 
Frick, John 
Grant, John 
Grosfetti, J. 
Hansen, Hans F. 

-1746 
Hansen, J. P. 
Ivars, Carl 
Jacobson, W. 
johansen, Arthur 
Johnston, R. 
Kolkin, Fred 
Krohn, John 



Langvid, Emest 
Lundquist, Alex. 
Menz, Paul E. 
Nelsen, Nels 
Olsen, C. 
Oterdahl, C. 
Paludan, Chas. 
Pedersen, Peter 
Pedereen, Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Petteson, Oscar 
Plottner, W. 
Rasmusen, Karl 
Rowke, Fred. 
Schivig, B. 
Wachmann, Hans 
Wallen, L. 
Wilson, John 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



DIAMONDS .- WATCHES -- JEWELRY 

ON CREDIT 



763 

MARKET ST. 

Upstairs 




San 

Francisco, 

Cal. 



Send for Handsomely Illustrated Catalogue— FREE 



C. BREINING Special Marine District Representative 



D.^EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



C. J. SWANSON 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 
HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 

Gold Braids and Gold Wreaths of 
All Descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 
Home Phone C-3486 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SESL CIGAR CO., MANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the address of 
Thos. Symington, age 59, last heard 
from in Seattle, Wash., 1908, will 
please communicate with John Sym- 
ington, 674 West Madison street, 
Chicago, 111. 

Information wanted of the where- 
abouts either of the parents or next of 
kin of Oscar Wilhelm Fredericksen. 
Fredericksen was born in Norway in 
1884; he was about five feet five inches 
tall; from light to medium build, blue 
eyes and blonde hair; had been on 
Pacific Coast of United States since 
1905; was a sailor. Write to F. R. 
Wall, Merchants' Exchange, San Fran- 
cisco, California, United States of 
America. Norwegian papers please 
copy. 

The Danish Con.'^ulate, 815 Mills 
Rldg.. San Francisco, Cal., seeks in- 
formation concerning a Danish sailor, 
Mr. Poul Christian Hansen, called 
Foul Hansen, born in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, January 28, 1870. His 
mother in Copenhagen has not heard 
from him since February, 1902, when 
he sent a letter from San Francisco 
to her. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Su. A. 
Anderson, V. 
Anderson, E. Alfred 
Barnard, C. 
Buckland, W. 
Buwmeister, I. 
Carlson, M. 
Carlson, Conrad -551 
Collins, E. F. 
Conrad, Fritz 
Driscoll, I. 
I>ublin. Gustaf 
Fors, Alfred 
Goude, C. 
(irove, Albert 
Gustafson, Johan 
Gustafson, Axel 
Hanson, H. I. 
Hakonson, Ingvar 



Hegan, Patrick 
Holten, Pete 
Jacobson. Erland 
Johanson, H. J. 
Karlson, N. 
Larson, Louis 
Lovik, Aron N. 
Lundbech, M. S. 
Marvin, Joseph D. 
Mlttemeyer, J. F. 
Nielsen, Wilhelm 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Nielsen, Chr. 
Nielsen, Niels -751 
Schclenz, Karl 
Smith. Max 
Sovig, Martin 
Stensland, Pan'. 
Weback, S. 




The trial of James B. McNamara 
for complicity in the destruction of 
the Times building, a year ago, began 
at Los Angeles, Cal., on October 11 
before Judge Bordwell. 

Teamsters in Barre, Vt., have gained 
a nine-hour day and a 10 per cent, in- 
crease in wages without a strike. The 
bakers have organized a union that 
embraces every man working at the 
trade in that city. 

At the convention of the Interna- 
tianal Association of Machinists, held 
in Davenport, la., $1,000 was appro- 
priated for the McNamara defense, 
and an assessment of 25 cents was 
recommended to the membership. 

Dos Moines' proposed street rail- 
way strike was officially declared oflf 
nil October 11, following the selection 
of the third member of the arbitration 
board in the person of John A. Gui- 
her, an attorney of Winterset, la. 

Approximately sixty men in two 
mines of the Cananea Consolidated 
Copper Company at Cananea, Mex., 
are on a strike, owing to the refusal 
of the company to reinstate a miner 
who was discharged because he re- 
fused to work in a stope which he 
considered unsafe. 

President Gompers, Vice-President 
Mitchell and Secretary Morrison of 
the American Federation of Labor on 
October 12 petitioned the District Su- 
preme Court to dismiss the charges 
of contempt preferred against them by 
a committee of lawyers appointed by 
the court last May. 

Lamp makers employed by the Hud- 
son Lamp Company, at New York 
City, have gained an important vic- 
tory, the company agreeing to recog- 
nize the union, granted a 9-hour day 
and time and one-half for overtime. 
Other important concessions were 
also granted. 

Thirty-five hundred custom tailors 
are on strike in New York City, but 
all indications point to a speedy set- 
tlement and victory for the work- 
men. Many of the employers have al- 
ready signed agreements with the un- 
ion and an average increase in wages 
of about 15 per cent, has been grant- 
ed. 

The United Labor Bulletin, of Den- 
ver, Colo., announces the successful 
termination of a strike in which Press 
Assistants' Union No. 14 secured a 
satisfactory agreement under which 
the cylinder pressmen's assistants 
get an advance of $1 a week from 
September 1, 1911, until September 1, 
1912, with an increase of SO cents a 
week thereafter for the succeeding 
two years. 

Three hundred men, women, boys 
and girls employed in the plant of the 
.American Druggists' Syndicate in New 
York have gone on strike as a protest 
against unbearable conditions. The 
strikers have been the recipients of 
exceedingly small wages and have 
been compelled to work from 7:30 a. 
m. to 6:30 p. m. Seventy-five men 
walked out and were followed by the 
rcni;iiii(lcr of the workers. 

Declaring that the cost of living 
has advanced with such rapidity that 
wages are entirely too low to provide 
a respectable existence, the Trades 
and Labor Council of Vallejo, Cal., 
on October 13 instructed its secretary 
to write the Secretary of the Navy, 
asking that a board of wages convene 
at Mare Island and rearrange the 
wage scale now in force at the Navy 
Yard. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



lias the Language. — Uncle Joe 
Cannon has taken up golf. He has 
passed the first examination in vo- 
cabulary very creditably. — Detroit 
News. 



Long Drawn Out. — "O. Bobby! 
You've been fighting that \\'ilfong 
boy again!" 

"Nope. Same old fight, mamma. 
Tliis was the ninety-seventh round." 



Plenty of Sand. — Food Inspector — 
Look here, you can't use this sugar. 
It's half sand. 

Confectioner — Oh, that's ail right. 
We use that for making rock candy. — 
Judge. 



Not Knocking Slattcry. — Mrs. Coo- 
gan — An' the little thing is the divil's 
own image of his father. 

Mrs. Slattcry — Yis, but I don't 
moind that so much so long as he 
kapes hilthy. — Puck. 



Aged. — "That," said tlic professor, 
"is an Egyptian Queen. She is at 
least 3000 years old." 

"My!" exclaimed the girl with 
large, fluffy hair; "I'll bet she'd be an- 
noyed if she knew you were telling 
it." — Washington Star. 



Her Crust With Her.— "What did 
she say when the Judge granted her 
a divorce, but forbade her to marry 
in this State again?" 

"She asked the Judge to make her 
husband provide her with traveling 
expenses." — Detroit Free Press. 



Not Such a Bad Idea. — "His wife is 
a business woman all right." 
"What makes you say that?" 
"She's installed a time-clock in the 
hall and he has to punch it when he 
goes out nights and when he gets 
back." — Detroit Free Press. 



Fostering Talent. — "You refuse to 
allow your son to study spelling and 
grammar?" said the teacher. 

"Absolutely," replied Mr. Groucher. 
"I want him to try his hand at cur-_ 
rent literature, and I don't propose 
to spoil his dialect and slang." — 
Washington Star 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They can not start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OI.D AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL. 

Is under the direct and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 

with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 

teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a knowl- 
edge of Navigation, and Navigation only. 
Conditions have changed, and the American 
seamen demand a man as a teacher with 
higher attainments than one who has only 
the limited ability of a seaman. The Prin- 
cipal of this School, keeping this always In 
view, studied several years the Maritime 
Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of Navigation and Its 
kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, for 
no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of common 
education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the depths of 
Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a comparatively 
short interval of time. WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nautical 
Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY 

J. COHEN a CO. 

Baltimore ClotHing Store 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 
have installed a Tailoring Department in their store and are now making 

Suits to Order 

Union Label, Union Tailors 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 




Eyes Examined Free 



Repairing Our Specialty 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock, at 

the Lowest Prices 

lamas 3i Soronsen ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 

jy#j antt Jrtoa. 



YEARS 



^<>o Issoid tJl MAiitl iinli ol tha co- ag 
— iVIKTBIiniONW. " 




UNION 



MA.De 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 




United States Nautical College 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

Member of California Teachers' Association. 

Candidates prepared in the shortest possible time for Masters, Mates, 

Pilots and Wireless Operators. 

Government E.xaminations. 

The Hitchfield system is the easiest and most modern in all branches. 

Do yourself the justice to investigate. 

320 Market Street, San Francisco. Phone Kearny 4686 



"Pay as You Sew" 

on Hale's 

"CRESCENT" 

Sewing Machine 

WINNER OF FIRST PRIZE 
AT 1911 CALIFORNIA STATE 
FAIR. 

.■\ m,-ichine that hurries to do its 
work, as it runs with lightnos. 
smoothness and speed. 

H.is features that make it more 
v.iluable than many higher priced 
agency makes; tlie reason why it 
todk l'ir>i i)rize at the 1911 State 
Fair when entered against other 
famous machines. 

lUiy this machine at Hale's on 
the club plan. $2.00 down, $1.00 a 
week. No interest. No extras. 
Xo collectors. 




Good good^ 

Market and Sixth Sts. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 



719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 
C. BREINING 

Representing Marine District 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

610 THIRD STREET 

Between Townsend and Brannan Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Kuinishing Uuuds, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises. Ba^s, Ktc, Uuots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Aut- 
(its a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest inarliet price, give us a call. IJO 
not make a mistake — Look for the Nam* 
and Number. 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



TSI 






ia^^ s-:.^ ^■5.-^ -..^ ^ v,virv ^ r.1. ^ ^ .»..^^g=Ka=srv^ 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, (or Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Juitice by Organization. 



VOL. XXV, No. 6 



SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 191 1 



Whole No. 2143. 



TO REVIVE AMERICAN SEA SPIRIT. 



Status of the Seaman. 

The law which set the seaman apart, 
making of him a thing outside of the Con- 
stitution of the country, seemed at first to 
have l)ut little power to modify either the 
people's temper or their mode of living. 
But the law, like the mills of the gods, 
grinds slowly, but finely and inexorably. 

Gradually the seamen learned their help- 
lessness and began to speak of their life as ac- 
cursed, a life in which there was no hope but 
death, no reward but toil. Alen on shore, 
aye, and women too, learned to look upon 
the seamen as their inferiors. This thought 
transmitted itself to the children and when 
the boy was asked to consider what he 
would be, when he grew up, he would more 
and more rarely think of the sea as a means 
of obtaining a li\'ing or upon which to find 
a career. 

In the forties boys ran away to become 
seamen; in the eighties they were sent to 
sea instead of to jail, and their mothers were 
heard to plead with the Judge : "Don't send 
my boy to sea, your Honor !" 

In the nineties a humanitarian association 
met in the city of San Francisco and con- 
gratulated itself upon the fact that it had 
done excellent work during the year among 
"criminals, prostitutes and sailors" ! Is there 
any wonder that these L'nited States have 
no seamen of their own? Is it a wonder 
that this land has so little of a merchant 
marine? 

Men and capital alike have sought other 
fields. To make the thing more complete a 
theory was evolved that no skill was wanted 
or needed at sea. Anybody that could be 
induced to go to sea was good enough, and 
hence it was not worth while to employ any 
l)oys. No skill being needed, therefore no 
training was needed ; hence boys were an 
expense, and it was decided to be good busi- 
ness not to carry any boys. 

If a young fellow was going to be master 
of a vessel, of course he was in need of some 
training and had to go to sea to obtain it. 
Accordingly he was sent to sea with some 
relative, and in the cabin, where his first 



lesson was to learn how to hold men who 
sailed before the mast in the utmost con- 
tempt. He learned to look upon the man 
in the forecastle as the "Southern gentle- 
man" looked upon the Negro. The man in 
the forecastle was a slave either from acci- 
dent or choice — but at any rate a slave. If 
he could do anything else he would not go 
to sea ! 

The shipowner would not carry boys ; the 
boys would not go to sea even when there 
was a chance. Ergo, very few American 
boys, very few American seamen. The Navy 
was filled with foreigners, and at one time 
when there was some possibility of war with 
a certain foreign power the men began to 
desert in very large numbers. The Navy 
Department then determined that the men 
in the naval service must be natives, or at 
least citizens ; but there was no body of 
natives or naturalized seamen to draw from, 
and they were finally sought for and ob- 
tained from amf)ng the farmer boys. The 
material was gooil, but it was only material 
and had to be shaped before it was of any 
value whatsoever. 

The Price of Sea Power. 

The people are now wanting both sea- 
men and ships, and are willing to do any- 
thing within reason to bring both cajjital 
and men to sea. 

Assuming that the laws be so amended 
that the seamen again regard themselves 
as men, the equals of other men, and that 
the earnings of seamen become such as to 
justify ordinary men seeking the sea for a 
living, yet there will be but a slow increase 
in Americans at sea unless the law shall be 
so amended as to compel vessels to carry a 
specific number of boys whenever they shall 
be obtainable. 

First, make the law such that it shall be 
a hcl]) instead of a hindrance in developing 
a body of native seamen, thus changing the 
Ijopular feeling about the sea. Then give to 
the .American boy the o|)])ortunity to be- 
come a seaman. Thus there shall be cre- 
ated sucii a body of seamen as the country 
shall need and can depend u])()n. 



Apprenticeship, you say ? No ; let them 
go to sea as boys ; let them live in the fore- 
castle with the men ; let them learn to do 
the work and at the same time to respect 
the men who are following the work for a 
living. Thus they shall ab.sorb the spirit of 
the sea, learn its traditions, learn to under- 
stand the feelings of the men with whom 
they are associated. In short, let them I)c- 
come seamen in the real and best sense of 
the term. 

You hesitate? Well, be sure of one thing. 
At no other price will you ever become a 
sea power. At no other price was sea power 
ever gained: at no other price was it ever 
retained. 

\\'hen a nation's men cease to be seamen, 
that nation ceases to be a sea ])ower. The 
Norsemen ceased to follow the sea, and sea 
power settled in the Hansa Federation. The 
people of the Hansa towns ceased to go to 
sea, because of ill-usage (.see their laws), and 
the ])ower on the sea went to the Italian 
cities. From the latter it ])assed to the pco- 
])les of Spain and Portugal, who, failing to 
conserve it by kee])ing ali\'e the sea spirit 
of the peo])lc, lust it to the Dulrh and the 
Ivnglish. 

The linglish i)ri)nght the sea s])irit with 
them to this country and were in a fair way 
of developing into a sea ])ower that might 
lake the sea from the Mnlhcr cnuntry. lUit 
the daughter wasted her heritage by injus- 
tice. -And now the niollier is going the same 
way. There is yet lime for the Mother 
country to retain its sea power by decent 
laws and the treatment of the seamen as 
I'leemen, and this roun'rv may have at least 
its share b\- just laws, h'ailing in this on 
the ])art of either or both, the scepter will 
|)ass to the yellow man. 

Do you wish sea power? Do you wish 
to be ca])ab!e of meeting the enemy before 
he lands on your shore? If so }'ou nuist 
have seamen. Wishing them, you nuist be 
willing to i)ay the price, ^'ou must be will- 
ing to do justice to the men of the sea. 

justice of yesterday is injustice of to-day. 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TRADE-UNION CONGRESS. 

The Forty-fourth Annual Congress of the 
Trade-Unions of the United Kingdom was 
held at the Town Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne, 
on Monday, September 4, and the five fol- 
lowing days. The Congress was presided 
over by the Chairman of the Parliamentary 
Committee, Mr. W. MulHn, J. P., the Gen- 
eral Secretary of the Amalgamated Associa- 
tion of Card and Blowing-Room Operatives. 
The standing orders of the Congress pro- 
vide that it shall consist only of representa- 
tives of trade-unions who are actually work- 
ing at their trades at the time of their ap- 
pointment, or who are permanent paid of- 
ficials of the unions they represent. Trade- 
unions may send one delegate for every 2,000 
members or fraction thereof, but many of the 
larger unions do not send the full number 
of delegates to which they are entitled. 
Voting on important questions is by card, 
on the principle of one vote for every 1,000 
members represented. 

The analysis into groups of trades given 
below shows the composition of the Con- 
gress, and the trade groups represented are 
compared with the corresponding figures for 
the Congress of 1910: 



Groups of Trade.s. 



1910 



1911 



za 



2:3 



<5 M 



Building 

Mining and quarry- 
ing 

Engineering 

Shiipbiiilding (inclu- 
ding lioilerm'kers) 

Otiier Metal Trades 

Textiles 

Clotiiing 

Transport (land and 
water) 

Cliemical, Gas and 
General Laborers 

Printing, Bookbind- 
ing, ete 

Pottery and Glass.. 

Woodworking, Fur- 
nishing, etc 

Baking and Cigar- 
making 

Knginemon 

Postoftice Employes 

Miscellaneous 



I 5 14 



3 10 

7 44 

14 I 98 

7 I 18 



14 



88.059 

566.830 
44,815 

71.620 

70,690 

235,229 

55,930 

143,466 

62,863 

61.553 
6,441 

22,932 

7,909 
51,834 
53,969 
95,713 



Oo 



.E 
2:3 



16 



-l- 



39,907 

565,513 
43,835 

76.346 

66,750 

234.846 

60,517 

171,064 

67.922 

58,893 
6.446 

28,639 

8,317 

53.093 

56,290 

107.129 



Total 1136 1496 11 , 639,853 1127 |520 (1,645.507 

The number of organizations accounted 
for in the above statement is 127, but some 
of these organizations are federations having 
members of several of their constituent 
trade-unions in attendance at the Congress. 
Allowing for such cases, members of about 
218 trade-unions attended as delegates this 
year out of about 1,154 unions in existence. 
The membership represented, however, com- 
prised more than two-thirds of the total 
membership of all trade-unions. The dif- 
ferences in the membership represented, as 
compared with the previous Congress, are 
partly due to certain trade-unions having 
been represented at only one of the Con- 
gresses. Thus the decline in the building 
group is due to the absence of representa- 
tives of the Amalgamated Society of Car- 
penters and Joiners, while the increase in 
the transport group is mainly caused by the 
attendance of representatives of the National 
Union of Sailors and Firemen, though part- 
ly also by growth in the membership of sev- 
eral unions which were represented at both 
Congresses. 

Among the principal subjects on which 
the Congress passed re^lutions were : Re- 
striction of the hours of labor to eight per 
day for workpeople generally; amendment 
of the Mines Regulation Act, the Factory 
and Workshop Act, the Shop Clubs Act, the 
Workmen's Compensation Act, and the Fair 
Wages resolution of the House of Com- 
mons; the wages and general conditions of 



labor of workers employed by contractors 
for the Government; labor exchanges; State 
insurance; evictions during trade disputes; 
State help for blind workpeople; and secu- 
lar education. 

The voting by Congress for members of 
the Parliamentary Committee for the en- 
suing year resulted in the election of rep- 
resentatives of the following organizations: 
Boilermakers and Iron and Steel Shipbuild- 
ers, Card and Blowing Room Operatives, 
National Dock Laborers, Gasworkers and 
General Laborers, Amalgamated Brass- 
workers, Miners' Federation, General Union 
Carpenters and Joiners, Railway Servants, 
Amalgamated Weavers, Associated Ship- 
wrights, Patternmakers, Shop Assistants, 
Bakers, Machine Workers, Printers, Ware- 
housemen, and Watermen, Lightermen and 
Watchmen. Mr. W. Thorne, M. P., was 
elected Chairman of the Committee and Mr. 
C. W. Bowerman, M. P., Secretary, vice Mr. 
W. C. Steadman, deceased. 



AUSTRALIA'S NEW CAPITAL. 



The Federal Government is pushing on 
with the preliminary work of building the 
Federal capital. The Commonwealth took 
over the area at the beginning of the year, 
and since that time has made great prog- 
ress in the work. Surveys have been made 
for railway lines, routes, reservoirs, and en- 
gineering works. Roads have been built 
and the culverts and causeways along 70 
miles of road cleared. The military college 
at Duntroon is now in working order, $110,- 
000 having been spent on it. The Dun- 
troon homestead, where the college is sit- 
uated, has been altered and additional 
buildings have been erected to meet the 
requirements of the students and the 
teaching staflf. A site has been selected for 
a national observatory, and the requisite 
buildings are in course of erection. Engi- 
neers are being employed to test the va- 
rious deposits in the territory with a view 
to ascertaining their value as regards build- 
ing material. A brick-making plant is to 
be erected at a cost of about $100,000. It 
is proposed to work the brick words, the 
lime kilns, and other undertakings by elec- 
tric power. 

An estimate of the cost of the necessary 
power plant has now been received from 
an expert, and tenders are likely to be 
called very soon. Altogether it is esti- 
mated that within the financial year $565,- 
000 will have been spent on works alone 
in the territory. This does not include the 
purchase price of the Acton estate, on 
which the administrative offices are to be 
erected. The idea of the Home Depart- 
ment is that preparations must be made 
for the supply of the needs of the large 
number of workmen required to build the 
future Parliament House, administrative 
offices and official residences. The above 
expenditure is, of course, preliminary to 
this end, and much more will have to be 
expended before the place is ready for the 
builders to commence. In order that the 
proposed Federal capital shall be built on 
the latest approved ideas, the Home De- 
partment has invited designs from archi- 
tects from all parts of the world. 

The plans embody Houses of Parlia- 
ment (for which the suggested dimensions 
are 600 feet frontage and 200 feet depth), 
so placed as to become a dominating fea- 
ture of the city, residences for the gov- 



ernor general and the prime minister, and 
also public offices comprising departments 
of the prime minister, external aflfairs, at- 
torney general, home affairs, treasury, trade 
and customs, defense, and postmaster gen- 
eral ; courts of justice, places of worship, 
mint, national art gallery, and library, state 
house, printing office. Government facto- 
ries, university, technical colleges, city hall, 
general postoffice, museum, central railway 
station, railway marshaling yards, military 
barracks, criminal and police courts, jails, 
hospitals, national theater, central power 
station, gas works, markets, stadium, and 
parks and gardens. In addition areas are 
to be laid out within the city for commer- 
cial, residential, and industrial purposes. 
Provision is to be made for tramways, 
ornamental water, a water supply on the 
basis of 100 gallons per head per diem, 
which will be delivered from a service res- 
ervoir at an elevation of about 2250 feet 
above sea level, and sewerage and sewage 
works. For the purposes of the design the 
population is assumed to be 25,000. 

Granite is said to be available in large 
quantities in the territory, but sandstone 
is not obtainable except at a distance of 
about 100 miles. Railway transport, how- 
ever, will be provided. It is anticipated 
that bricks of good quality can be made 
locally, and there is an ample supply of 
material for road construction. 



DUNDEE WHALERS PROSPEROUS. 



The dividend of 34^ per cent, just de- 
clared by the whaler Balsena of Dundee 
has attracted attention to the handsome 
profits at present being realized from this 
industry, which a few years ago was be- 
lieved to be on the point of extinction. 
Last year the dozen or so of whalers which 
prosecute the fishing from Dundee had the 
most successful season experienced for 
twenty years, and reports just to hand in- 
dicate that the Norwegian companies are 
also enjoying a high degree of prosperity. 

The usual course pursued by those Nor- 
wegian companies has been to buy second- 
hand British steamers and then fit them out 
with all the most modern appliances for 
whale catching and trying out. With such 
equipment the whole process of recovering 
the marketable products from the carcasses 
can be carried on at sea. 

The first trial was made in 1903 by a 
firm in Sandefjord, and two years later an 
expedition was sent to the Antarctic ocean. 
It met with immediate success, and since 
then the industry has increased rapidly un- 
til as many as twenty expenditions, with 
crews aggregating 700 men, are at work. 
Indeed, so marked was the degree of suc- 
cess which they met with that their in- 
creased supplies of whalebone were last 
year held responsible for the sharp decline 
in values which took place. 

Stimulated to emulation by their success, 
a Tyne firm is about to dispatch five ves- 
sels, three whalers, a factory ship and an 
oil carrier, to operate in the vicinity of 
Kerguelen Island, where the Norwegians 
already have stations. Three of the vessels 
will be adapted for fuel oil. Norwegian 
whaling companies are also reaping enor- 
mous dividends in southwest African wa- 
ters, and a German company has just been 
formed with a capital of £50,000 to par- 
ticipate in the industry there. — London 
Financial Times. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



McNAMARA DEFENSE FUND. 



ALL TRADE-UNIONS, INDIVIDUAL 
TRADE-UNIONISTS AND THE PUB- 
LIC AT LARGE ARE URGED BY THE 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE McNA- 
MARA DEFENSE FUND. CONTRIBU- 
TIONS MAY BE SENT TO THE OF- 
FICE OF THE COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL OR TO FRANK MORRISON, 
SECRETARY, AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR, 801-809 G ST, N. W., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



"Philanthropic" Steel Trust. 
American traditions are being shattered and 
American customs obliterated by the trusts. 
In the State made famous by the "Minute 
Men" and glorified by the struggle on Bunker 
Hill women are being slaughtered to provide 
dividends for the corporations. Following the 
dreadful revelations in the works of the Blake- 
Knowles Pump Company at East Cambridge, 
Mass., comes another exposure in Worcester, 
Mass., revealing the horrible fact that frail 
women are employed in the wire mill of the 
Billion Dollar Steel Trust and are compelled 
to perform tasks that would shorten the lives 
of strong men. This is what tlie Boston 
American has to say about it : 

Women lift as much as 5,200 pounds of wire 
daily at the wire-making branch at the plant of 
the Billion Dollar Steel Trust at Worcester. 

The women work at this killing labor for ten 
hours a day. 

They have to stand all the time. 

The atmosphere in which they toil is heavy 
with dust. This dust is part dirt, part metal 
particles. It imperils the health of the women 
through contact with the delicate tissues of the 
body. 

Outside of this peril the work is dangerous in 
itself. The "snapping" or "back-coiling" of wire 
in the spooling and drawing rooms causes loss of 
fingers, or even of an arm or leg at times. 

Clergymen, physicians and others condemn this 
terrible employment of women in the Worcester 
Wire Works. The women say: "It is fearful. 
But one must live." 

Here is a brief quotation from one woman's 
own description of her work: "This is what I do. 
I work in the spool room where the wire is wound 
from a can to a spool. These spools weigh ten 
pounds each. I average 260 spools a day. I 
have to lift these spools twice each and carry 
them from one end of the room to the other. You 
can figure out how much lifting I have to do." 

Worcester is the second city in Massachusetts. 
It boasts itself as the "Heart of the Common- 
wealth." Its manufactured goods go to all parts 
of the world. 

The biggest manufacturing plant in Worcester 
is that of the American Steel and Wire Com- 
pany. This is one of the subsidiary corporations 
of the United States Steel Corporation. 

In the North Works are women, widows and 
mothers, many of them, who spend ten hours a 
day in heart-breaking, soul-killing, back-bending 
toil. They toil and toil without hope. They la- 
bor while they last. Tiien go to their miserable 
homes to rest. Sometimes they return to the wire 
works to take up the burden of life again. Some- 
times they do not return. Others fill their 
places. 

Worcester is one of the cities that the ex- 
ponents of the "Open Shop" claim as their 
own. They have boasted that they have killed 
off the forces of organized labor, and intro- 
duced a class of "free and independent work- 
men." The Steel Tru.st is also an exponent 
of the "Open Shop" and employs only free 
and independent workmen. The above ter- 
rible indictment, not from organized labor but 
from an independent source shows conclusive- 
ly the necessity for the organization of the 
workers if they would preserve American tra- 
ditions and the spirit of American justice. 



Trade-unionism still lives in Worcester and 
it will yet purge the city, and save the work- 
ers from thraldom. 



A Mighty Demonstration. 

Washington, Oct. 14. — With a shout, the 
echo of wiiich will ring over distant Los An- 
geles, the people of Philadelphia have voiced 
their protest against the un-American act of 
kidnaping the McNamara brothers, ten thou- 
sand men and women, of that class that rep- 
resents the bone and muscle and intellect of 
the Republic paced with steady tread the streets 
of the "City of Brotherly Love" and 15,000 
citizens acclaimed every utterance of the cham- 
pions of organized labor who declaimed for 
liberty and the preservation of the traditions 
of our land. It happened on the evening of 
Tuesday, October 10, and the following ex- 
cerpt from the Public Ledger of Philadelphia 
tells the story : 

Fifteen thousand workers — members of all the 
various unions in the city — filled and surrounded 
the Labor Lyceum, in Sixth street, last night and 
gave to Samuel Gompers, President of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor; Frank Morrison, Sec- 
retary of that organization, and Frank Ryan, 
President of the International Iron Workers' Un- 
ion, a wild ovation. 

The occasion was one that stirred every good 
union man's heart to speech and song. The dem- 
onstration was one of protest — protest against 
any adverse decision that the Los Angeles courts 
might make against the McNamara brothers, John 
J. and James B. — who are to be placed on trial 
to-day charged with complicity in the dynamiting 
of the plant of the Los Angeles Times. Gompers, 
Morrison and Ryan, the latter an intimate asso- 
ciate of the defendants, who belonged to the un- 
ion which he heads, stirred the 3,000 persons 
crushed inside the big brick edifice to a very rage 
of enthusiasm. 

When the venerable head of the federation rose 
to speak the cheering lasted for five minutes and 
could be heard distinctly two squares away. Mor- 
rison's address was punctuated with roars of ap- 
proval and snatches of the French battle hymn — 
the Marseillaise — taken up by the throng in the 
hall and roared by the responsive crowd in the 
street. 

It was by all means *:he greatest demonstra- 
tion that labor has ever made here. A great 
parade, in which at least 10,000 men and women — 
young and old — marched, preceded the meeting. 
That parade was one at which to wonder. And 
certainly the spirit that prevailed within its ranks 
was one with which to reckon. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Postal Strike Threatened. 

Reynold's Newspaper is authority for the 
following statement : "It would paralyze the 
whole trade of the country if there occurred a 
general strike of postal workers, and as there 
is so nnich discontent with the system in 
vogue, the ramifications of which are very ex- 
tensive, the men may one of these days take 
the matter into their own hands and stop 
work. One can easily imagine what the effect 
would be. To discuss in this column the nu- 
merous grievances of the postal employes 
would be impossible, but the leaders of the 
Postmen's Federation are doing their best to 
prove to the Postmaster-General the difficul- 
ties which the employes have to contend with. 
Hut up to the present the leaders have only 
met with rebuff. There is very grave and 
serious discontent, and something will have to 
be done to rectify matters. The Postmaster- 
General has been asked to appoint a select 
committee of the House of Commons to in- 
quire into the grievances and claims of the 
employes, but so far nothing has been done. 
Arrangements are being made to hold a series 
of meetings in London to acquaint the public 
with the facts of the case. The casual labor 
.system, which affects over 70,000 men and 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 1J4 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Atlantic District. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Uniteu Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palrnerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Dubois- 
straat 12, Antwerp, Belgium. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritinies de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, 15 Rosenberg gar- 
den, Bergen, Norway. 

. SWEDEN. 

.Svenska-Sjomcns-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnclgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nedcrlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nedcrlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Fcdcrazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova, Tiazza L. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Ilandcls-Transport, Vcrkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbcitcrinncn Ocstcrrcichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

SPAIN. 
Fcderacion Nacional de Obrcros de Mar de 
Bufjucs v pucrto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoncta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 
Fcderacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Firt- 
me:.), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World^s Workers. 



A succcsslui IiKiustrial Bazaar, for 
tlu' purpose of raising funds to or- 
ganize women, was Iield in the Trades 
Hall. Sydney, .'\us., recently. 

Building operations at Hobart, Tas- 
mania are "hung up" because the em- 
ployers won't pay fair wages to the 
bricklayers. 

The Government harness factory, 
near Melbourne, .\us.. is now in full 
swing, and 80 men are engaged in the 
manufacture of accoutrements. 

The British Home Secretary's De- 
partment was represented for the first 
time at the Trade-Union Congress, at 
Newcastle-on-Tyne (Eng.), recently. 

Ten thousand operatives at Lodz, 
the "Manchester of Poland," have 
struck work against low wages and 
the tyrannic;il rule of their masters. 

There are carpenters working in 
Bowen, Aus., for 10s. per day, which 
is lower than the wages board rates 
for Brisbane. 

It is understood that the Brisbane 
(.\us.) Men's and Boys' Clothing 
Trade Wages Board will arrive at a 
determination sotne time before the 
close of the present century. 

The strike at the Dowlais (Eng.) 
steel works has ended in a victory for 
the men. The employers have agreed 
to recognize all the unions and do 
business with their representatives. 

Auckland (N. Z.) waterside workers 
are taking a ballot on the question of 
severing their connection with the lo- 
cal Trades and Labor Council, with 
the object of joining the New Zea- 
land Federation of Labor. 

The report of the Labor Depart- 
ment of the British Board of Trade 
shows that the general level of wages 
in Britain in 1910 was the highest 
since 1893. Still there are millions of 
people in England who are on the 
verge of starvation. 

At a recent meeting held at Caxton 
Hall, London, under the auspices of 
the National Anti-Sweating League, 
a young woman, who has been work- 
ing in a factory for thirteen years. 
stated that many women worJ<ers had 
to subsist — not live — on a three-half- 
penny meal a day. 

The West Australian Timber Work- 
ers' Union, formed four years ago, es- 
timates that it has secured an extra 
£25,000 a year at least for its 2000 
members — something over £10 a year 
on the average — and all that it has 
had to pay out over strikes and lock- 
outs is about £18,000. The Union re- 
cently provided scholarships for the 
sons and brothers of members, at a 
cost of £1600. 

In Uruguay there is being proposed 
an eight-hour w-orking day for all 
workmen, including industrial and 
commercial employes; one day of rest 
after every six working days. State 
pension for working women just be- 
fore and after confinement, during 
which period they will not be allowed 
to work, such pension to be paid by 
the State pending legislation on in- 
surance and workmen's savings banks. 

A report issued by the Labor De- 
partment of the British Board of 
Trade, shows that in August there 
were on strike 148,000 railway work- 
ers, 78,000 dock laborers, carmen and 
others; 35,000 dock workers, seamen, 
etc., at Liverpool and Birkenhead; 
3,000 carters at Manchester, and 2,5(X) 
and 1,000 tramwaymen at Glasgow 
and Leeds, respectively. There were 
100 new disputes during the month af- 
fecting 365.256 more than in .'\ugust 
last vcar. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

SAN PEDRO California 



M. BRONVIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

427 l-'ROINT STWEET SAIN f>Ht>RO 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct froin Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to inspect our stoclt. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




him. Loose labels 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
in retail stores are counterfeits. 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New Yorl<, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 



Fourtii Street 
Between Front and Beacon 
SAN PEDRO 



Sts. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 
Medicines, Soaps and Toilet Articles 

FRONT ST., GPP. S. P. DEPOT 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

Wa Call and Dellvar 

The French Dye Works 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Alex Eduard Malmberg, born 
Malmo, Sweden, 50 years old, tall, 
blond. Mr. Malmberg has been a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific in 1908. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about 50, last 
heard of at Melbourne, Australia, is 
inquired for by his brother. Address 
Martin Johansen, 839 Centennial ave- 
nue, Alameda, Cal. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building, San Francisco. 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



llnlon ^^mk^ "Ale 

MADE g^^^a *ND 

5e<T 1 ^^^ J Pon«r 

^^J»o Of America r^Dyr 

COPYRIGHT STRAOE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Hans Merz, who went to Alaska in 
the spring of 1910 on the schooner 
Ottilie Fjord, and upon return left the 
vessel in Tacoma and has not been 
heard from since, is inquired for by 
the secretary of the Marine Cooks' 
and Stewards' Association of the Pa- 
cific Coast, 51 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Will Martin Billington, who was 
employed at Hallverville Cannery last 
summer, communicate at once with 
F. R. Wall, attorney for Otto Schel- 
lin, 324 Merchants' Exchange, San 
Francisco? 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



.\ndcrsen. Axel B. 
Anderson, A. -1447 
Anderson. V. -16C0 
Aiiibrc, Francesce, 

-,"),'i5 

Andersson. O. -1363 
Anderson. Anders 
.Anilor.st'U. Hans C. 
.\iider.son. Sum 
Anderssen. Hildlng 
.\ndorson, Chas. 
Berndt. Hugo 
Berg, H. T. 
Berggren. Otto 
Huehtman, F. 
Ro.ardsen, S. 
lUdander, B. B. 
Birnlsen. Fred 
Herner, Axel 
Backlund, John 
Carl.oon. Oskar 
Cliristensen, A., 

-1325 
Chrislensen, L., 

-1360 
Christensen, Lorentz 
Kaugal, A. 
Dempsev, Harry 
K( kart. Th. G. 
Krickson. Edward 
Engstrom, Richard 
Eugene. .John 
Fors. A. 
Frank. Maurice 
F\iss. H. 
Felsoh, Chas. 
Kasig. Don 
Fischer, W. 
FiSL-her, J. -56G 
Glaase, Gustav 
Gouda, C. 
Gravier. Eugene 
.Graf. Otto 
Ilansson. Johannes 
Hansen. Nikolai 
Hagen, Sigurd 
Huvey, Andrew 
Halsten. Axel 
Holmes, Oscar 
Hansen, Almar 
Holmes, Alex. 
Holm, Carl 
Heltwood, O. S. 
Halvorsen, H. E. 
Hansen. Berger 
Hoglund, .J. A. 
Hod, Fred 
Trwin. nobert 
Infoi'ssen, Jon 
John.son, Gunnar 
Jiicohsen, John 
.lohnsen. Ernst 
Johnson, I/Ouls M. 
Johnson. Hans -1422 
Johansen, Ernest 
.Tones. Harry 
.lohnson. J. A. 
Klahn. K. 
Kii.sik. M. 
Kallas. A. -921 
King. W. B. 
Kallas. Martin 
Krinkel. J. 
Kuline, W. 



Kalow, Robert 
Karlson. Uagnar 
IJster, W. 
I.utten, Then. -1653 
I>arsen. Maxsie 
I^arsen, Kristian 
Ludviksen, A. -1249 
Laine, E. 
I.under, BJorn 
Murie, T. 
Muhlberg. Arnold 
Madsen, M. J. 
Martin, \Vm. 
Makinen. Karl 
Mathiesen, N. -1296 
Martinsen, Martin 
Meyer. H. -1192 
Malmgren, E. 
McKae. A. 
Mellerup. Jens 
Meyer, H. -1792 
Martin, Jolm B. 
Miller, Cliarles 
Nyman. Gustav 
Nielsen. I^auritz 
Ochmichen, Fred. 
Oissoii. A. P. -1109 
Olsen, Harry -766 
Ossls, Andrew 
Olsen, O. S. -112.T 
Olsen, Anders 
Olsen, Hans C. 
Peterson, John 
Petersen, I.auritz 
Peterson. O. 
Rasmussen. S. Soren 
Richter, Richard 
Roed. I.eif 
Raymond. J. 
Strahle, Carl 
Sievers. Herman 
Sandseter. Henry 
Schneider, Henry 
Smith, Ed. 
Salo, Chas. A. 
Stube. Harry 
Sandell. John 
Slattery, W. H. 
Stephan. M. -14r)5 
Swansson, Hugo 
Sundslrom, F. 
Scott, Ed. 
Samuelsen, Victor 
Snow, W. 
Smith. J. S. 
Thorsen, Johannes 
Tillman. Charlie 
Thornlund. Jolm 
TTdby, Harald 
ITtby. Carl 
Wasserman, Hans 
Wasserman. M. -1261 
Youngson. E. 
Yuhnke, \V. (Reg. 

Letter P. O.) 
Zimmer, Walter 
Zimmerman. Fritz 
Zorning. Arthur 

Photos and Packages 

Grossl. Joe 
Pothofr. Harry 
Raustanius. J. 
Schultz, Albert 



4 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Nielsen, from .'Narhus, Den- 
mark, is inquired for by Christ Han- 
sen, 230 W. Thirty-second street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship Candida at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 

The U. S. District Court in New 
Orleans has decided the case of John 
Kauer vs. the SS. Dover in favor of 
the libelant, and the New Orleans 
Agent has collected the money. Any 
one knowing the address of John 
Kauer, please communicate with the 
Sailors' Agent in New Orleans, 
George C. Bodine, 514 Dumaine St. 

Lott Bartlett Walls, who has been 
sailing for years between San Fran- 
ci.'ico and China, is inquired for by 
his brother, John M. Walls, 2722 
Thomas street, St. Louis, Mo. 

John Percy Bawdcn, age 29: 7 
years on the Pacific Coast; last 
known address 52 Mission, is inquired 
for by his mother, Mrs. Bessie Baw 
den, 5 York Rd., Seacombe, Ches- 
hire, England. 

M. Samuelson, born in Gottenborg, 
Sweden, age about 44, last heard of 
in Honolulu, is incjuired for by his 
nephew, A. Johnson. Address, Sail- 
ors' Union of the Pacific, San Fran- 
cisco. 

John J. Griffin. No. 8107, L. S. U.. 
last heard of at Baltimore, Md., in- 
quired for by his sister, Mrs. Allen, 
4749 Ontario St.. Chicago. 111. 

Richard Standish, an English en- 
gineer, who left the S. S. Kansas 
City in July, 1909. Information want- 
ed by British Consulate, San Fran- 
cisco. 



I 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The steamer James M. Donahue, Adolph P. 
Polsson master, and the schooner O. M. Kellogg, 
Ole Olsen master, have been enrolled at San 
Francisco. 

Subject to safe arrival lionie. the British bark 
Marlborough Hill, now en route from the Sound 
to the United Kingdom, has been sold to Finnish 
buyers for $24,500. 

Without ceremony of any kind, the keel of the 
Jupiter, the million-dollar collier under construc- 
tion at Mare Island, was formally laid on October 
18. 

Another terrific storm lias swept the west coast 
of Mexico. One schooner is reported ashore at 
Mazatlan, and the "Frisco" wharf has been se- 
verely damaged. 

The Canadian Pacific steamship Princess Beat- 
rice, which went ashore on Noble Island on Oc- 
tober 14. was floated on the 20th. Temporary 
repairs were made by the salvors, and the ves- 
sel proceeded to Esquimalt. 

F. G. Pulis has been appointed master of the 
steamer Crowley No. 16, vice Alexander Mc- 
Laughlin; B. L. Weith of the steamer Sentinel, 
vice Louis Cordano; George \\'inkel of the steam- 
er Washington, vice Frank Patterson. 

The Canadian Pacific steamship Princess Bea- 
trice, running between Vancouver, Prince Rupert 
and the northern canneries, struck on Noble 
Island on October 14. .\11 hands were landed 
safely. 

The American schooner William Nottingham, 
which was abandoned off tiie Oregon-Washing- 
ton coast on October 13, was towed into Astoria 
on the ISth. The Nottingham's officers and crew 
reached Astoria on the previous day on the Brit- 
ish schooner David Evans. 

The battleship Oregon, rebuilt and modernized, 
moved under her own steam for the first time in 
six years on October 20 and made a trial spin 
from the Puget Sound Navy Yard across the 
Sound to Seattle, around the Seattle harbor and 
back to her anchorage at Bremerton. 

United States Local Inspectors Bolles and 
Bulger at San Francisco on October 20 handed 
down an opinion exonerating from blame Captain 
A. Anderson, master, and C. L. Hagen, second- 
mate, of the steamer Bowdoin, which grounded 
ofT Point San Pedro on June 10 of this year. 

News was brought by the steamer Zeelandia, 
which arrived at Victoria, B. C, on October 17 
from Australia, of the wreck of the .'Australian 
coaling steamer Rosedale, with all hands. The 
steamer ran into a heavy gale after leaving the 
north coast for Sydney and foundered. 

The steamship Victoria arrived at Seattle on 
October 18 from Nome, .Alaska, with a million 
dollars in gold Indlion and 841 passengers, the 
record for the season's southward passage. Half 
of the gold was consigned to Seattle banks and 
the assay office here and the remainder to San 
Francisco. 

The power schooner Bender Brothers, from 
Nome and the Kuskokwim River, passed in at 
Cape Flattery on October 14, disabled and with 
more than twenty-five people on board starving. 
Her gasoline engine exploded nine days ago, 
when the schooner was 180 miles off the Cape, 
severely burning the chief engineer. 

Lighthouse Inspector Henry L. Beck has rec- 
ommended to the Lighthouse Bureau at Wash- 
ington that what is known as a lightship buoy, 
a combination of an acetylene and a whistling 
buoy, be placed off Oxford Reef, at Cape Blanco, 
as an aid to mariners until an appropriation can 
be secured for a lightship there. 

Those interested in the .San Francisco whaling 
fleet have good reason to congratulate each other, 
for three of the whale hunters are now steaming 
back to the Golden Gate with cargoes of whale- 
bone worth several hundred thousand dollars. 
The Karluk netted ten and the William Baylies 
landed six bowheads. The whalers left Unalaska 
several days ago and are expected in about Oc- 
tober 26th. 

The four-masted British ship Dowan Hill has 
been sold to Norwegian buyers for $27,000. The 
Norwegian ship Prince George was recently put 
up at auction at Liverpool, withdrawn at a bid of 
$17,000 and finally sold for $17,850. The Prince 
George was originally the Calistoga. Later her 
name was changed to .Sierra Cadena, and when 
she was put under the Norwegian flag she became 
the Prince George. 

The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company 
has just contracted with the Maryland Steel Com- 
pany for the construction of five freight steamers 
of 10,000 tons each, to be used in the San Fran- 
cisco-New York service via Isthmus of Tehuan- 
tepec. They are in addition to the eighteen now 
owned by the company and will be named Min- 
nesotan. Dakotan. Montanan, Panamanian and 
Pennsylvanian. 

Negotiations are now being m;ide by the .Amer- 
ican-Hawaiian Steamship Company with the Los 
.•\ngelcs Harbor Commission for the exclusive 
use of lOOO feet of water frontage at San Pedro 
.It wliich the company has announced it will dock 
its eighteen big freight vessels now sailing on 



the Coast, and as soon as the Panama Canal is 
completed will dock five new passenger steam- 
ships now in course of construction. 

The schooner E. K. Wood, Captain Hellquist, 
bound from San Pedro for Grays Harbor, put 
into San Francisco on October 14 to effect re- 
pairs to damages sustained in a heavy blow off 
the southern coast. On the morning of the 8th, 
in latitude 43.10 north, longitude 134.30 west, the 
Wood was struck by a fierce northwest squall. 
The flying jibhoom, bowsprit, foresail and two 
jibs were carried away and considerable damage 
done about the decks. 

Reports of a successful season's work of the 
only floating cannery in the world, the old sail- 
ing ship Glory of the Seas, which has just re- 
turned to Tacoma from Southeastern Alaska, 
make it evident that the plan of placing a can- 
nery on shipboard is destined to be widely copied. 
Options have been closed by various firms on a 
number of old barges, and the next season will 
see at least half a dozen floating canneries in 
operation. 

The new schooner .\tlas wliich was built at San 
Francisco to replace the schooner Triton cleared 
on October 16 for Jaluit, Marshall Islands, in 
command of Captain Othmer. The .Atlas is of 
the type of South Pacific trader that is turned 
out in local shipyards. Schooner rigged, the 
craft is equipped with a powerful gas engine, 
which she can use to good advantage in calms and 
in plying among the many islands of the Marshall 
group. 

The S. S. Freeman Steamship Company of San 
Francisco has added to its fleet by the launching 
of a new steam-schooner from Aberdeen yards. 
She is called the Daisy Gadsby and will operate 
in conjunction with the Daisy, Daisy Mitchell and 
Daisy Freeman. The new craft has the distinc- 
tion of being the largest of the type to be con- 
structed at Grays Harlior. Her length is 196.5 
feet, her beam 41 feet and the depth of hold 14 
feet. 

An active volcano submerged forty fathoms 
below the surface of the sea is emitting its molten 
lava into the waters of the Pacific, according to 
an announcement made by the Hydrographic Of- 
fice at San I'rancisco in a notice to mariners. The 
volcano was discovered by the British man-of- 
war Torch while cruising in the South Seas a few 
weeks ago. It lies about nineteen miles north- 
west of Tongabatu Island, in the Tonga or 
Friendly group, its exact location being latitude 
20:50 south, longitude 175:33 west. 

The United States revenue-cutter Manning, 
which was on the Bering Sea patrol with sev- 
eral other vessels, has returned to San Fran- 
cisco from the far north. The Manning reported 
that there were few violations of the law. Three 
Japanese who landed on St. George Island were 
arrested and sentenced to six months in jail, but 
before their sentences expired they were deported 
on a Japanese sailing schooner, homeward bound. 
Four other Japanese who were caught sealing 
within the three-mile limit are now serving in the 
Valdcz jail. 

While the San Francisco whalers have had good 
catches, the masters have not been without their 
troubles. It is reported that desertions from the 
whale hunters were common. P'ifteen members 
of the crew of the Karluk. it is said.'attemiited to 
jump ship, but were rounded up. While the Kar- 
luk was in Unalaska an armed guard from the 
revenue-cutter Manning kept the men on the ves- 
sel. Deserters from merchant craft are a menace 
to the northern settlements, according to the 
revenue-cutter officers. The men can obtain no 
work and prey upon the natives and soon become 
a charge of the Government. 

With the addition of the Princess Alice and 
Queen Alexandra and the new coaster for the 
northern run now under construction at Paisley, 
Scotland, to the Canadian Pacific Railway fleet, 
the total aggregate of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way steamers will numl)cr seventy-six vessels, of 
twenty types. These vessels, if placed in a single 
line, would stretch for a distance of over three 
and one-half miles. Over 12.000 men are em- 
ployed in crews and shore staff, and about 3000 
tons of coal are burned daily by the fleet, which, 
if on rails at one time, would occupy seven trains 
of forty trucks. 

Dismasted and floating at the mercy of the 
waves, a schooner, sui)posed to be the wreck of 
the Oliver J. Olson, was sighted by the steamer 
San Jose a quarter of a mile west of Cape Falso 
on October 7, according to a report made by Cap- 
tain Follett, at Portland. The schooner, he said, 
was dismasted with her anchors down and a part 
of her deck load aboard. She was painted green. 
On the same day, rejiorts Captain I-'ollett, he 
sighted a derelict schooner with the stumjis of 
four masts standing ten feet out of the water, 
nine and a half miles northwest of Cape I*'also. 
Tlie derelict was half a mile from the beach. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND. Me.. 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa.. 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 4 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala.. 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS ANU >«'ATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va.. 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS. La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 Broad. 

Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New Yorlc Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 53 St. Anne St. 
BALTIMORE. MD., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 4 Conti St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 206 Moravian St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR. O.. 992 Day St. 
BRIE, Pa., 107 B. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
MARINE CITY, Mich., P. O. Box 773. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
HURON, O., Lake Seamen's Union. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 316 Kinzie St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., t,:, M.iin St. Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1101 W. Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St 
CHICAGO. 111.. 314 N. Clark S(. 
ASHTABULA, O.. 74 Bridge St. 
T0LEI30. O.. 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich . 7 East Woodbridge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St. 
CONNEACT, <)., 922 Dav St. 
OGDENSnUUG. N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA. N. Y.. 152 M.iln St 
StIPERlOU. Wis. 1721 N. 'I'liinl K(. 
BAY cri'Y, Midi., ins Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pn.. 107 E. Third St. 

SO^^TH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS it; advance. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - Jl.OO 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Paclflc, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 25. 1911. 



SANTA ROSA VERDICT. 



The verdict in the inquiry into tlie loss of 
the steamer Santa Rosa was handed down hy 
Local Inspectors Rolles and Bulger at San 
Francisco on the 16th inst. The verdict in 
the case of Captain Faria is as follows: 

Captain Faria acted in an unusual manner in 
giving the .second mate the orders on a piece of 
paper, and not giving them verbally at the same 
time; also in not seeing that he read the orders 
and signed them. Not having done so, he should 
have gone on the bridge when he was on deck 
at 12 o'clock (midnight) and seen that his orders 
had been carried out. When he was called by the 
third mate he should have inquired particularly 
for the time, as he must have known that it was 
after 12 o'clock (midnight) and, as he has stated, 
it was his wish to get a sounding to be sure of his 
position. When he came on deck a short time 
before the vessel stranded, he says the light on 
the port side did not look like .Arguello light. 
As he came on deck and saw the light well ahead 
on the port bow, had he hauled the vessel off 
shore until he could decide about it. he would 
have saved the vessel. As the Point Arguello 
light was a fourth order fixed light, it would not 
show up large or bright on a hazy night. 

.\ftcr the vessel stranded, had he got his life- 
line on shore, and his boats and rafts out as 
soon as it was daylight, when, by all the testi- 
mony, the sea and swell were much less than in 
the afternoon, he could have landed his passen- 
gers on shore with much less risk to them, and 
he would have had a clear ship to work on, and, 
having no passengers to take care of. he could 
have given all his attention to getting afloat if 
possible. 

We are satisfied that the charges of negligence 
and unskilfulness are sustained, and hereby sus- 
pend the license of J. O. Faria as master and pilot 
for twelve months from this date. 

Third-Mate Thomas is censured for not 
keeping a hetter lookout and failing to notify 
the master as to the lights seen. His license 
is also suspended for one year. No action is 
taken by the Inspectors regarding the respon- 
sibility of the Pacific Coast Steamship Com- 
pany for the delay in landing the passengers 
and the consequent danger and discomfort to 
which they were subjected. 

This omission constitutes the most impor- 
tant feature of the Inspectors' findings. The 
suspension of the officers' licenses may be jus- 
tifiable as the law stands. Morally, however, 
the justice of the sentence imposed upon Cap- 
tain Faria and Third-Mate Thomas can not 
be determined apart from consideration of 
the "rules of the Company," which, as likely 
as not, arc in conflict with the rules of sea- 
manship. 



\Miatever the iniluence from "Headquar- 
ters" brought to bear upon the officers of the 
Santa Rosa to make them neglect the dictates 
of good seamanship, it is certain that the 
Coinpany was directly responsible for the fail- 
ure to land the passengers at the earliest pos- 
sible moment and, incidentally, for the subse- 
quent loss of three members of the crew. As 
already stated, the failure of the Inspectors to 
take cognizance of this feature of the wreck 
is the most important part of tlicir report. 

Accidents will happen in the best regulated 
ships. In such cases the most important ques- 
tion is not "How did the accident happen?" 
but, "What steps were taken to minimize the 
danger to passengers and crew?" The report 
of Local Inspectors Bolles and Bulger tells us 
how the accident to the Santa Rosa happened, 
but is absolutely silent upon the more impor- 
tant question. True, the report finds that had 
Captain I'aria "got his life-line on shore, and 
his I)oats and rafts out as soon as it was day- 
light ... he could have landed his pas- 
sengers on shore with much less risk to thein." 
This, of course, is quite obvious. Equally ob- 
vious, but entirely ignored by the Inspectors, 
is the fact that Captain Faria acted upon in- 
structions from "Headquarters" in keeping 
his passengers on board pending the negotia- 
tion of "satisfactory terms" for their trans- 
shipment ! 

Notwithstanding the stress laid by the news- 
papers upon the attitude of the Company, at 
the time of the wreck, little notice has been 
taken of the findings. The wreck of the Santa 
Rosa has long since ceased to be a nine-days' 
wonder ; consequently the press is now silent, 
and will remain so until another afifair of the 
kind takes place, when the press will again 
tell us "all about the big wreck!" A notable 
exception to this rule is presented by The Bee, 
of Sacramento, which comments upon the ver- 
dict of the Inspectors, as follows : 

For negligence and lack of skill in the manage- 
ment of the steamer Santa Rosa, before and after 
she was wrecked near Point Arguello in July last, 
the captain and third-mate have been suspended 
for a year. 

The sentence is a just one, altogether sup- 
ported by the circumstances, but it should have 
been followed by censure of the Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company for the despicable part it 
played after the unfortunate accident in bicker- 
ing over the terms of rescue. 

Not a word was said by the United States In- 
spectors, who conducted the inquiry, in criticism 
of the company for sending a flood of wireless 
telegrams directing the captain what terms to 
make and negotiating the price of rescue with 
another vessel. 

Technically, the inspectors had a right to ig- 
nore the testimony as to the company's malicious 
intrusion, as the captain was absolute master of 
the vessel by all maritime rules, and never should 
have relinquished his independence for a moment. 
Nevertheless, he was an employe of the company, 
and felt himself bound to give some heed to the 
commands from headquarters. He was not a free 
agent in the full sense of the term. 

The company, therefore, merited severe cen- 
sure, both as a punishment for its conduct in re- 
gard to the Santa Rosa and for the sake of the 
effect on other vessel owners who might try the 
same thing in the future. 

As The Bee points out. the Inspectors were 
technically within their rights in ignoring the 
Company's instructions to Captain Faria, fol- 
lowing the wreck. Right here arises the ques- 
tion as to whether such technical compliance 
with the law is in keeping with public policy. 
Another question that naturally suggests itself 
is as to whether the law which holds the ship- 
master solely responsible for the management 
of his vessel may, or may not, be adapted to 
present methods in the maritime world. It is 
quite apparent that the theory under which a 
shipmaster is monarch of all he surveys doesn't 
jibe with the practice of instructing the ship- 
master by wireless from "Headquarters." Be- 
tween the theory and the practice here stated 
exists a gap through which the innocent 



third i)arty — i. e., the passenger — is apt to fall, 
and perchance be drowned. In our opinion the 
theory of sole responsibility in the shipmaster 
is as well founded to-day as it ever was. 
Consequently we believe that any interference, 
by wireless from "Headquarters" or other- 
wise, with the shipmaster ought to be con- 
demned at least as strongly as any mistake 
made In- the shipma.ster himself. 



THE McNAMARAS AND LABOR. 



Some misunderstanding seems to exi.st con- 
cerning the attitude of the labor movement 
toward the McNamara trial, now proceeding 
in Los Angeles. Briefly, the position assumed 
in certain quarters is that organized labor is 
unduly active in defense of the McNamaras, 
thus bringing into question its own motives. 
The reasoning upon which this view is based 
is made clear by the following, from The Bee, 
of Sacramento: 

The Bee views the McNamara case in Los An- 
geles as a travesty upon justice and a shame 
upon American jurisprudence, in this — it looks as 
though it were to be a trial of the principles of 
Labor Unionism and not of men accused of mur- 
der. 

There is absolutely no reason under the 
heavens why the trial of these McNamaras should 
not be completed as quickly and with as little 
venom and bitterness on either side as would be 
the trial of anybody else accused of such a capital 
crime. 

There is only one question before the court, 
and there should be only one question before the 
jury. That question is: Did the McNamaras 
commit a fiendish murder? If they did it should 
not take a year or two to establish that fact. If 
they did not, it should not take a year or two to 
show their innocence. 

If they are innocent, they and all their friends, 
champions and allies should invite the fullest ex- 
amination, should court all the proof. 

Our contemporary, influenced no doubt by 
its wishes, is in error in assuming that "there 
is only one question before the court." We, 
too, wish it were so; but every detail of the 
case, since the destruction of The Times ^build- 
ing, proves the contrary, proves that the one 
question before the court, if indeed there be 
but one question, is a question not of the 
guilt or innocence of the McNamaras, but of 
the standing of the labor movement before the 
world. Of course, there ought not to be any 
such question involved in the trial, but there 
is, and he would be blind who should fail to 
recognize the actual fact. In like vein is the 
following, from the Public Ledger, of Phila- 
delphia : 

The McNamara parade by union labor in this 
city on Tuesday night, on the eve of the begin- 
ning of the dynamiting trials in Los .'\ngeles, was 
very impressive as a physical demonstration of 
the solidarity of labor and of the loyalty of union 
men to their comrades; but it is to be questioned 
whether it will be deemed a wise proceeding at 
some later day when union labor shall be led and 
counseled by wiser men than those who now give 
the commands. Unionists would not receive the 
respect of their fellows if they did not prove loyal 
to them in times of stress, and there can be no 
objection to the eager, enthusiastic effort by 
union men generally to see to it, if they are in 
doubt, that the indicted men shall have every as- 
surance that they shall have a fair hearing. But 
there is a vast difference between loyalty to labor 
on the one hand and on the other a frank spirit 
of hostility to the administration of the law. 

The attitude of labor toward the suspected 
dynamiters seems to indicate not that their sup- 
porters wish justice, but rather that they wish to 
prevent justice. The whole McNamara campaign 
from the day the evidence was produced in In- 
dianapolis has had too much the appearance of 
an attempt to overawe the courts and to check 
the orderly administration of justice. 

The Philadeljjhia demonstration was of a piece 
with the agitation elsewhere. The transparencies 
declared that if the McNamaras are hanged there 
is an army that will know the reason why, and 
the frank intimation is that it will be unsafe to 
punish the defendants because they belong to a 
body which is so numerous and powerful that it 
must not be touched by the arni of justice 
whether the men are innocent or guilty. 

We are not prepared to defend the trans- 
parencies or other media by which the labor 
movement expresses itself. Possibly some 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



things are said that had better be left unsaid ; 
possibly, too, some interests are at work os- 
tensibly in the interest of labor but in reality 
in the interest of other elements. These con- 
siderations, however, are of secondary impor- 
tance. The main point is that the enemies of 
labor in Los Angeles and everywhere else are 
now, have been since the beginning and will 
be until the end, engaged in an effort to prove 
the labor movement particeps criminis in the 
The Times explosion. 

The labor movement does not wish to pre- 
vent justice to the McNamaras, neither does 
it propose to incur the risk of injustice to itself 
by taking for granted the professions of the 
prosecution as to its singleness of purpose. 
Those who wish to see justice done will sup- 
port, rather than oppose the labor movement 
in its determination that the McNamara trial 
shall not be made a means of exploiting the 
views and gratifying the ambitions of union 
haters. Only by so doing can the friends of 
justice derive assurance that there shall be 
"only one question before the court," and that 
the question of innocence or guilt on the part 
of the accused men. 



"A GRAND OLD MAN." 



Under the above caption the Portland ( Or. ) 
Labor Press publishes its views concerning 
one of California's greatest citizens, as fol- 
lows : 

While congratulations and glory are being passed 
around in California over the sweeping victory 
of the people in carrying the Initiative, Referen- 
dum and Recall by a vote of three to one, there is 
one man above all otliers now alive who deserves 
the crown of wild olive leaves that the simple 
Greeks of two thousand years ago placed upon 
the heads of faithful servants of the state. 

This man is now the Grand Old Man of Cali- 
fornia. He never held an office. He led the van 
without insignia and without rank. His paper for 
over a quarter of a century issued at a financial 
loss, and in spite of threats and boycotts of the 
privileged classes that kept it a weekly, never 
ran out an issue without a demand for the Ini- 
tiative, the Referendum and the Single Ta.x. In 
season and out of season he hammered and thun- 
dered for democracy, for justice, for freedom, for 
MEN. 

Not until his life is run will the people of Cali- 
fornia rear monuments to the greatest journalist 
save Henry George that California ever produced 
— for such is the way of democracies — but there 
are two more things that he would rather see in 
operation now than all the honors, titles and 
emoluments that could be heaped upon him. One 
is to ride in a municipally owned and operated 
street-car to the Beach. The other is to see the 
Single Tax in California as far advanced as in 
Vancouver, B. C. 

No paper ever did more for liberty and de- 
mocracy. "For the cause that lacks assistance; 
'gainst the wrongs that need resistance" has been 
in spirit and in fact heading the columns for more 
than twenty-five years. Not always right, not 
always wise, not always diplomr;tic, but always 
just, always for freedom, always for the workers, 
always for the great plain, common people, it has 
done more for California than any paper ever 
published in that corporation-ridden, special priv- 
ilege-cursed State. 

"When the roll is called up yonder" — and may 
it not be called for this Tribune of the People 
for years to come — a bright and brilliant Star, 
scintillating with the liglit of truth and love for 
mankind, will throw its rays upon the sturdy 
spirit of James H. Barry. 

"Well done, thou good and faithful servant!" 

So .say we all of us ! The Journ.\l heartily 
echoes every word of the foregoing. Every 
honest man and publication in California will 
join in acclaiming James H. Barry a prophet 
who is NOT without honor in his own country. 
The Star — Piarry's Star — has for a generation 
been the guiding" star of our hopes. When it 
comes to passing round the honors due for 
the recent victories of democracy in Califor- 
nia one man and one paper may truly and 
without invidiousncss be said to "lead all the 
rest," and that same is James H. Barry and 
Barrv's Star. 



TO REVIVE AMERICAN SEA SPIRIT. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



The conception of justice is changing, de- 
veloping. To the men of the sea must be 
given the full share of that development. 
Nothing short of this will do, because you 
have given to all men the benefit of knowing 
how to read. Knowing this, man will asso- 
ciate with the best minds, learn from them, 
insist upon gradually bringing the actual 
conditions of life nearer to the ideal thus 
formed. Failing in this he leaves the call- 
ing or country where this is denied. 

The seamen's bill, H. R. 11372, introduced 
liy the Hon. William B. Wilson, of Penn- 
sylvania, will, when adopted, do much to 
rectify present wrongs, to redress existing 
grievances. May the seamen have your sym- 
pathy and your support ! We ask for it in 
the name of fairness, justice and fair play 
to us, and in the best interest of yourself as 
a man and a patriot. 

Andrew Furuseth. 



FISHERMAN GETS DAMAGES. 



Demand the union label on all products ! 



San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 18, 1911. 
Editor Coast Seamen's Journal-: 

Sir — It is not often that a sailor and a fish- 
erman too gets anything in the way of dam- 
ages for personal injuries received by him, so 
that it will be of interest to your readers to 
know that a verdict for $4,800 v as returned 
by a jury in Judge Hunt's Court yesterday 
(October 17) in favor of Otto Schellin and 
against the North Alaska Salmon Company. 

.Scliellin went up on tlie George W. Curtis 
in the spring of 1910, and after working 
around the cannery at Hallerville for tliree or 
four weeks, was put to work on the fish dock, 
running the gasoline engine. On July 11, 
1910, he went up on the overhead platform 
to put the belt, which had slipped off, on the 
grind.stone pulley. While doing this, his 
clothing was caught at the waist band by a 
set screw, which stuck out about one-half inch 
from a collar around the shafting, which col- 
lar was about eighteen inches from the grind- 
stone pulley. Schellin was whirled around 
the shafting until his clothing was all torn off, 
when he fell naked to the floor, with his left 
leg broken in two places and his left arm 
broken just below the shoulder. The worst 
injury was the break in the bone of the left 
leg just at the hip joint. 

None of the recent laws enacted by tlie 
States of Washington, Oregon and California 
in favor of workingmen apply to cases where 
the men are injured while on shore in Alaska. 
The man has to trust his case to the old Com- 
mon Law rules covering the relations of mas- 
ter and servant, and these, you know, make it 
particularly difficult for him to recover. 

In view of the fact that a large majority of 
the men working on shore along the sea coast 
of Alaska are, in one way or another, seafar- 
ing men, it seems to me that it would be de- 
sirable for the unions of the seafarers of tlic 
Pacific Coast to make an effort to get the 
Congress of the United States to pass some 
sort of a Workmen's Compensation Act ap- 
plicable to the District of Alaska. It does not 
seem to be quite so hard to pass legislation of 
tliis nature as it is to get Congress to enact 
legislation putting the seafarer upon the same 
footing with the landsman in .so far as the 
contract between him and his emjiloycr is con- 
cerned, as is shown by the existence of the 
Safety Appliance Act in favor of the railway 
men. Yours very truly, 

F. R. Wall. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 23, 1911. 

Regular meeting came to order at 7:30 p. m., 
Chas. F. Hamniarin presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. 

Notice: The election of delegates to the Bal- 
timore convention of the I. S. U. of A. will be 
held in the regular meetings held at Headquar- 
ters and Branches on Nov. 6, 1911. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Bell Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C. Oct. 16, 1911. 
Situation improving. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1365, 



Tacoma .\gency, Oct. 16, 1911. 

Shipping slack. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle .Agency, Oct. 16, 1911. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 

4403. 



Port Townsend .A.gency, Oct. 16, 1911. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229y2 Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency. Oct. 16, 1911. 
Shipping medium. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Bo.x 6. Tel. 2002. 



Portland, Ore., Agency, Oct. 16, 1911. 
Shipping medium. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 17, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

JOHN W. ERTCKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 R. 



San Pedro /\gency, Oct. 16, 1911. 
Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu ,^gency, Oct. 9, 1911. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. TAUCER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 20, 1911. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Wm. Brisco in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shii)i)ing slack; plenty of men ashore. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary 

Piione Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 12, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping slack; prospects poor. 
LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
1003 Western Ave. P. O. Box 1335. Phone 
Sun Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 11, 1911. 
No meeting. Shipping cpiict; plenty of men 
asliorc. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



ilca(l(|uartcrs, Chicago, Oct. 16, 1911. 
.Situation unchanged. 

VICTOR A. OLANDER, Secretary. 
570 W. I,ake St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



IFcad(|uarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 16, 1911. 
Shiijping and [irospects good. 

WM. 11. FR.AZIER, .Secretary. 
IjAA Lewis St. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^^^* 



OIN THE GREAT LAKES, 



(Conlributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*^^* 



CITY OF DETROIT III. 



Detroit, the water-loviiiff, Detroit, the en- 
tliusiastic, recently went to Wyandotte to 
witness the lannching- of tlie side-wheel pas- 
senf>;er steamer City of Detroit III, the 
greatest Lake steamshii) of her kind. 

\ot a hitch marred the dip of the great 
steel hull that June I. next year, will leave 
the yards of the Detroit Shii)l)uilding Coin- 
l^any, the finest and largest fresh water ship 
designed for conveying travelers. 

Twenty-four hundred of those who wit- 
nessed the launching were guests of the 
Detroit Board of Commerce. They went 
from Detroit to \\'yandotte on the river ex- 
cursion boat Hritaimia. Returning, they 
saw the City of .\lpena. which more than 
thirtv vears ago was christened City of De- 
troit, the first to have the name. 

When the Alpena came out Frank Kirby, 
who has designed all of the Detroit & Cleve- 
land Navigation Company's steamers and 
who is the dean of passenger boat architects 
on the Great Lakes, met with opposition 
from those who owned her, as the boat was 
thought to be .so large she never would at- 
tract enough business to pay expenses. 

The City of Detroit 1 1 1 is seven times as 
large as the City of Alpena. Sixty-four 
staterooms is the extent of the .Alpena's ac- 
commodations while the new steamer will 
have 500. The first City of Detroit is 245 
feet long and sixty-four feet wide, over all. 
'I'he new ship is .500 feet long and ninety- 
eight feet wide, over all. No larger ship 
can navigate the harl)()rs of Lake Erie and 
at ])rescnt she will not l)c able to enter Cleve- 
land. The management of the D. & C. fleet 
intends using her between Detroit and Buf- 
falo until the E. 9th street pier station at 
Cleveland is completed. 

The new boat will cost when completed 
ap])roximately $L500,000. Her hull is of 
steel and her top sides extend to the prom- 
enade deck instead of the main deck, as 
usual. This construction is part of the fire- 
l)roofing system which includes fire walls 
and a cargo hold wherein a fire, should one 
start, could not escape to the cabins. 

Passenger cabins on the new ship will be 
more complete than those of the City of 
Cleveland. The lobby will be on the Doric 
order and ceilings will be supported with 
huge marble columns supporting bronze 
capitals and resting on bronze bases. The 
woodwork will be Spanish mahogany inlaid 
witli ebony and other foreign woods. The 
rest of the ship will be finished in etjually 
elegant style. Lighting has been given spe- 
cial attention. 

\\'hen the ship enters service, the present 
City of Detroit will be rename*! City of De- 
troit III. Four boats will be put on the 
Cleveland run at that time, two of which 
will ply between Cleveland and Mackinac 
Island. Captain .Alexander J. McKay will 
be master of the Citv uf Detroit III. 



The steamer Alary E. Ilarijcr and the 
barge Salem, bound from Ecor.se to the 
Coast, will load coal at .\shtabida for Mon- 
treal. They will be the last of four steam- 
ers and seven barges of the Harper Trans- 
portation Company to leave for the Coast. 



NEW DOCKS FOR CLEVELAND. 



Passenger boats docking at the foot of E. 
9th street, on new steel and concrete piers is 
what is promised by the Detroit & Cleveland 
and the Cleveland & Buffalo boat companies. 
The biggest boats on the Lakes, of too great 
size to dock in the Cuyahoga River, will 
make Cleveland a regular stopping point 
and Cleveland will benefit by the increase 
in all the accommodations these modern 
boats offer to the traveler. 

The forecast that the boats will be tying 
up at the foot of E. 9th street, is made by 
T. F. Newman, general manager of the 
Cleveland & Buffalo Transit Company. The 
fulfillment of his p'-ediction is contingent 
upon the decision of the Supreme Court, to 
which litigation over the Lake front will be 
carried this fall. Xewman is confident the 
higher courts will concur with the common 
pleas ruling. 

"We have a cpiarter of a million dollars 
ready to put into the new piers, the minute 
we get the word from the Supreme Court," 
.said General .Manager Newman. "There 
won't be any delays after the courts get 
through with this matter. Our money is all 
ready, the contracts will be let without de- 
lay and nnich of the work could be done 
this winter, I think. In the spring the job 
would be rushed and we could have the 
docks ready for the boats before August L 
next. 

"If the courts ajjjirove our contract with 
the city for the lease of the docks, the Cleve- 
land and Huffalo Transit Company will at 
once |)lace an order for the construction of 
the biggest side-wheel passenger boat in the 
world. She will be even bigger than the 
City of Detroit III, launched recently at De- 
troit. F. M. Kirby of the Detroit Shipbuild- 
ing Company is working on the design for 
this" vessel now. 

"Watch how the Lake transportation 
business increases if the courts open our 
Lake front to the transportation companies 
and the public. There is a great quantity 
of freight that Cleveland shippers would 
send by water, but they hesitate about haul- 
ing up and down the long hill to the river 
front. The new piers will be a trade stimu- 
lant to Cleveland, aside from better travel- 
ing conditions." 

The City Council made contracts with the 
boat com|>anies a year ago. The lease cov- 
ers a period of forty years. Suit to enjoin 
the city from carrying out its contract with 
the boat companies was started by the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, which corporation lays 
claim to Lake frontage in the lease. John 
G. W'hite seeks to restrain the city from 
disposing of any of the Lakeview Park land, 
claiming that under the provisions of the 
deed to the city the park must not be used 
for any but i)ark purposes. -A violation of 
this. White sets up, forfeits the contract and 
the land reverts to the heirs of the original 
owners. 



The tug .\. C. Harding will tow the No. 
S7 to Sarnia and the 120, which will trade 
to Detroit, will be towed by the tug J. M. 
Truby. 



FIRST GAS ENGINE ON LAKES. 



Quite a new departure in the type of ves- 
sel navigation in inland waters, has been 
created by the arrival in Canada of the ship 
Toiler, as she is the first vessel driven by oil 
engines that has ever been seen in this coun- 
try and is, consequently, the pioneer oil \ es- 
sel to be einployed in Canadian trade. 

Oil combustion furnishes the propelling 
power instead of coal. She is remarkabk- in 
appearance as well as in her engines. Ow- 
ing to the nature of her motive power she 
possesses no funnels and practically no 
masts, beyond a couple of small spars used 
mainly for hoisting freight. This unique 
ship w-as designed and built by Messrs. 
Swan, Hunter and Wigham Richard.son, 
Ltd., the well-known shipbuilders of Walls- 
cnd-on-Tyne, England, who designed and 
built the Mauretania and other ships of re- 
nown. 

The Toiler was built at Neptune yards, 
and is consigned to Clarence I, de Sola, of 
Montreal, who is in control of the business 
interests of Swan, Hunter and Wigham 
Richardson in this country. Mr. de Sola will 
take over the vessel on arrival and she will 
be operated in the trade between Mon- 
treal and Lake Superior. 

The vessel is propelled by two sets of two- 
cycle reversible Diesel oil engines. In many 
ways .she is more economical than a steam- 
driven boat. She has a greater deadweight 
capacity, owing to the fact that the Diesel 
engines are much lighter than steam en- 
gines, and as there are no boilers, the boiler 
s])ace is saved, moreover, the oil fuel is car- 
ried in the double bottom in place of water 
ballast, thus saving bunker space. The con- 
sumption of oil is much less in weight than 
the consumption of coal for steam engines. 

The deck machinery and enginerooni ac- 
ces.sories of the Toiler are driven by com- 
l)ressed air being furnished by a compressor 
driven by a Diesel engine. The electric light 
with which the vessel is fitted obtains its 
power from a paraffin engine. The accom- 
modation is heated by hot water, the heat 
being obtained from the exhaust gases of the 
main engine. There is thus no steam on 
board the boat. The officers' and men's 
quarters are elegant and comfortable. 



RESCUE NINE FROM HAYWARD. 



Nine seamen were taken off the steamer 
Hay ward when that vessel foundered off 
W'hite Rock on October 6. The Harbor 
I'each life-.saving crew responded to the call 
for help and rescued the seamen while the 
lumber laden boat was pounding on the 
rocky shore. The I lay ward was bound 
down from Duluth to Buflfalo. .A heavy 
sea caused the boat to go ashore at a point 
about ten miles l)elow Harbor Beach. A 
tug was dispatched from Port Huron on Oc- 
tober 6 to release the vessel. The Hay ward 
is owned by Gilbert Lacroix of Mt. Clem- 
ens, Mich. She is 137 feet long, with 28 feet 
beam and L^ feet depth. She was built in 
1887 and has a gross tonnage of 304 and a 
net tonnage of 224. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



LUMBER RATE ADVANCED. 



The supply of coal tonnage is in excess 
of the demand, but owing to the crowded 
condition of the docks vesselmen are turning 
down cargoes for the Canadian head of the 
Lakes. Delays of a week have been quite 
common at Ft. William, and some of the 
coal carriers will be held at that port for ten 
or twelve days. It is understood that a big 
steel steamer that loaded at Cleveland a 
few days ago for Ft. W illiam was paid a 
premium and boats to load this week could 
get an advance. 

There is still a large amount of coal to go 
to the Canadian head of the Lakes and ship- 
pers that are depending on wild tonnage 
will have trouble sending cargoes forward, 
as there will not be much imi)rovement in 
the dock situation. 

Tonnage for other ports is offered freely, 
and there are vessels on the market for early 
loading that have not been ])laced. Dis- 
patch is slowing up all around and coal car- 
riers are spending more time in port than 
they did a month ago. 

The grain freight situation is unchanged. 
From the head of Lake Superior to Bufifalo, 
a cent on wheat was offered recently and 
some tonnage was lined up. The shippers 
are in the market for boats for the last trip 
and winter storage, but no charters were re- 
ported. The ore trade is taking care of very 
little wild tonnage. 

The lumber rate from the head of the 
Lakes to Lake Erie ports was marked up 
25 cents, and has been firmly established at 
$2.50. The steamers Robert Holland and 
Argo and the schooner Chester B. Jones 
were chartered at the advance. More car- 
goes were offered and the owners look for 
a good demand during the lialance of the 
season. Boats that trade t(t the head of 
Lake Superior can only make a few more 
trips. 



CHARGES AGAINST COMPANY. 



The long list of ciiarges against the Amer- 
ican vShipbuilding Company and the Haw- 
good Brothers, prominent vesselmen, was 
increased in length recently, when attorneys 
for the Commonwealth Steamship Company 
filed suit in common pleas court against the 
American Company, James E. Wallace, R. 
C. Wetmore, H. Hawgood and W. A. Haw- 
good. Wallace is IVesident and Wetmore 
Vice-President and Treasurer of the ship- 
building company. 

The litigation, involving more than $350,- 
000, closely follows five suits for rescision 
of contracts made by the Commonwealth 
Company with the American Company. 
The latter suits, which involved more than 
$L0O0,00O, were filed in Federal court. The 
sale of two ships since the filing of the cases 
in Federal court, cuts the numlier of re- 
scision suits to three. 

Although Attorneys Griswold & White 
and Thompson & Hine are back of the suits 
against the Hawgoods, the pleading was filed 
in the name of Attorney C. R. Bissell. It 
was announced that another case similar in 
nature would be started. 

The Commonwealth Company's representa- 
tives say the Hawgoods received commissions 
from the American Company for the sale of 
three boats. These commissions, it is assert- 
ed, aggregate $30,000. '\'hv I lawgoods, as 



agents for the Commonwealth, received $5,000 
for the sale of each boat, tlie petition says. 

Boats sold by the Commonwealth, men- 
tioned in the suit, are the W. R. Woodford, 
sold to the Inland Steel Company : the W. .A.. 
Hawgood, to M. A. Hanna & Co., and the 
A. H. Flawgood, to the Inland Steel CompauN-. 
The vessels averaged about $75,000 each. 

The Hawgoods, those bringing the suit 
claim, can not act for two ])rincipals at the 
same time. L'pon this basis the petitioners 
ask judgment from the defendants of $189,- 
935 and interest, amounting to approximately 
$75,000. 

.Attorneys fighting the i lawgoods and tiie 
American Siiipbuilding Company have not yet 
finished the taking of dei)ositions. Until they 
do. none of the cases will come to trial. 



NO SUPPORT TO BOAT COMPANY. 



Frnm the ])rosent outlook, reorganization 
of tlic (lilchrist Transportation Company 
will be done by creditors without the helj) 
of stockholders. Stockholders had until 
close of business recently to signify their 
willingness to share in the revamping plan, 
but they did not do so. 

On November 11 the Guardian Savings 
& Trust Company, acting as trustee, will 
jnit up at auction sale $3,000,000 second 
mortgage bonds of the vessel companj^ ; 
these bonds had been put up as collateral for 
loans from a number of Cleveland institu- 
tions. 

Foreclosure proceedings on the vessel 
company's property will follow, the property 
to be bought in by those interests which 
decide eventually to reorganize the com- 
pany. Stockholders are not finally pre- 
cluded from taking part by their failure to 
do so up to date. 

The Gilchrist Transportation Company 
went into receivers' hands in February last 
year. It has outstanding $1,852,000 first 
mortgage bonds and receivers' certificates 
of something o\er $700,000, besides its debts 
to the American Shipbuilding Company, the 
chief other creditor. The Gilchrist Coiu- 
])any's property has been appraised at more 
than $5,000,000. 



LUMBER TRADE MORE ACTIVE. 



The lumber business in the Duluth dis- 
trict has experienced considerable improve- 
ment of late. More actual sales and in- 
(|uirics are reported than in many months. 
The Virginia & Rainy Lake Company, 
with mills at Virginia and in Duluth. has 
sold 10,000,000 feet in the past week. Sales 
not heretofore reported will approximate 
15,000,000 feet. These figures refer entirely 
to the cargo trade. The car trade is also 
enjoying great activity and is in satisfactory 
shape. 



CLOSE TO THE RECORD. 



Ore reccii)ts for Sei)teniber set a new 
mark for a month's receipts ff)r the ])ast two 
seasons and came near passing the month's 
record mark totaling 1,238,431 tons. The re- 
cei])ts for the sea.son to date are 5.250,881 
tons, as com])ared with 5,289,261 tons for the 
same time last year. 'J'he foreign shipiucnts 
during the month were very heavy, the value 
of exi)orts l)eing $401,129.06. Cement ship- 
ments were good, 31,900 tons being sent out 
from the local port. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persua- 
ding seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas Reid, marine fireman, 45 Assump- 
tion street, Detroit, Mich., is inquired for by 
his mother. 



Joseph Orlick, last heard of on steamer 
Santa Marie, in 1908, is inquired for by 
Carl Stocket, 71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



NOTICE TO MASTERS. 



The following notice was reccntlv sent 
out by direction of Cf)loncl John Millis, Uni- 
ted States Engineer: The gas buoy at the 
entrance to Ashtabula Harbor is out of or- 
der. It will be repaired as soon as possible. 
A red lantern will mark the spot at night. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY, 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 
570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
Telephone, Franklin 278. 
BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR. 21 High Street 

Telephone 652. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

TOLEDO. O B4 Main Street 

Telephone Bell East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

ERIE, Pa 107 E. Third Street 

Telephone Bell 699 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 

HURON, O Lake Seamen's Union 

MARINE CITY, MIoh p. Q Box 773 

PORT HURON, Mich 617 Water Street 

KINGSTON, Ont Box 96 

HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT. MICH.. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth. Minn. S.aRlnaw, Mich. 

Esrnnaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Mich. Sliol)oyK;in. \V\f>. 

HouKhton. Mich. Sturgeon Bay. Wis. 

TiUdington, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

ManlstPi, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ICEBERG DETECTION. 



During the summer of 1910 experiments 
were made in the northern portion of the 
Gulf of St. Lawrence with a new type of 
marine thermometer, the results of which 
promise to aid in the detection of icebergs 
in fog and at night. A detailed account of 
the invention is published in the supple- 
ment to the Forty-third Annual Report of 
the Canadian Department of Marine and 
Fisheries. 

By means of this new type of marine 
thermometer it is possible to record accu- 
rately and continuously sea temperatures to 
one one-thousandth of a degree centigrade. 
The microthermometer is of the electrical 
resistance type, in which variations of the 
resistance of the metal wire serve to give a 
measure of the changes of temperature of 
the medium in which the instrument is im- 
mersed. The resistance of the wire is 
made so high that small variations in tem- 
perature produce comparatively great 
changes in the resistance. 

The coil is made with a resistance of 125 
ohms and consists of 250 feet of pure iron 
wire silk covered and wound on a copper 
cylinder about 4 inches in diameter and 6 
inches wide. The cylinder is fitted accu- 
rately inside a second copper cylinder. The 
ends of the cylinders are carefully soldered 
and rendered water-tight, while the con- 
necting wires pass out through the middle 
of the outer cylinder. A stout copper tube 
is riveted on to the outer cylinder, to which 
other copper tubes can be fastened. The 
wires pass through a lead cable to the 
chart room, where they are connected to 
the bridge for obtaining a measure of the 
temperature resistance. Thus the absolute 
temperature, as well as the small varia- 
tions, can be accurately measured. By 
means of a suitable modification and combi- 
nation of a Calendar recorder with the wire 
bridge it is possible to record automatically 
the temperature to one one-hundredth of a 
degree. Readings can be taken every half 
minute, and curves are plotted showing the 
variations of water temperatures. 

The instrument is supported over the 
side of the ship about 5 feet under the sur- 
face of the water. It has been found that 
the exposure of the bulb of the thermome- 
ter by the waves produces no irregularities, 
as the temperature of air in direct contact 
with the sea does not differ from that of 
the water. 

Heretofore the proximity of icebergs has 
been determined by means of the bridge 
thermometer and by immersing a mercury 
or alcohol ship thermometer into buckets 
of water drawn up from varying depths. 
These instruments are not, as a rule, grad- 
uated to less than a single degree, which 
represents an interval on the stem of only 
one-eighth of an inch. Temperatures taken 
in this manner, even as often as four times 
in an hour, in a ship going at 8 knots give 
temperatures only every 2 miles. The tem- 
peratures of the sea change rapidly in the 
immediate vicinity of an iceberg, hence 
comparisons made between observations 
taken at intervals c>f even one mile are of 
no value in determining the presence of ice- 
bergs. The oscillations can be observed 
only on a continuous record. On the scale 
of the new electrical thermometer a single 
degree of temperature is represented by an 
interval of two feet, so that variations 
which would be imperceptible on an ordi- 



nary thermometer have a great effect on 
this sensitive instrument. 

Dr. Otto Pettersson (Geographical Jour- 
nal, vol. 30, p. 295) has shown that in the 
neighborhood of ice melting in salt water 
three different currents are discernable : 
One on the surface, being produced by the 
cold and light fresh water running down 
the iceberg; another current at intermediate 
depths, which runs straight toward the ice; 
while a third current, consisting of water 
cooled by the ice, sinks to lower depths. 

Numerous tests were made with the new 
microthermometer in the vicinity of ice- 
bergs near the coast of Labrador. The re- 
sults of these tests tend to show that tem- 
perature variations are nil at a distance of 
more than one mile from the iceberg; that 
going toward the berg there is at first a 
rapid rise of temperature, followed by a 
sudden drop. The sharp rise before the 
sudden fall can be taken to indicate the 
entrance of the ship into the surface cur- 
rent of the berg, and furnishes an indica- 
tion of the close proximity of ice. If the 
rise is followed by a rapid fall below the 
mean temperature of the water, the pres- 
ence of ice may be taken as fairly assured. 
The details of one observation, in illustra- 
tion of this, follow : At 7 p. m. the ship to 
which a microthermometer was attached 
passed within half a mile of a very large 
iceberg. The temperature first commenced 
to rise at 6:45 p. m., reaching a maximum 
of 4.6° C. (40.28° F.) at 6:50 p. m.; and it 
immediately fell with extreme rapidity to 
about 2.3°' C. (36.14° F.) at 7:03 p. m., after 
which, as the ship drew away from the 
berg, it rose rapidly to about 3.6° C. 
(38.48° F.). As this ship was making about 
nine knots, it was easy to draw a chart 
showing variations of temperature with dis- 
tances. 

Boundaries of currents and their varia- 
tions of position with tides, seasons, etc., 
can be easily worked out from a series of 
continuous temperature records of the 
character described. Near the shore there 
arc generally colder undercurrents, which 
are turned up to the surface by the grad- 
ually shoaling bottom and there are also 
temperature disturbances due to currents 
of fresh water from streams and rivers 
along the coast. These factors produce dis- 
turbances which, recorded by this new ma- 
rine thermometer, will serve as warnings to 
ships running too close to such obstruc- 
tions. 

The inventor of the thermometer is Mr. 
Louis V. King, lecturer in physics, McGill 
Universitv. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



The supi)ly of cheese in England has been 
greatly reduced by the drought and there 
has been a consequent rise in prices. The 
stock in Canada is also below normal. Al- 
though the imports from New Zealand 
during the year ended June 30, 1911, were 
only 20,256 long tons, a decrease of nearly 
2.400 tons over the previous year, a much 
greater quantity is expected during the pres- 
ent year. Experts state that Canadian cheese 
would be more suitable for the British trade 
from June to September if shipping were 
delaved until the cheese is more matured. 



A new British Columbia law prohibits the 
practice of medicine after January 12, 1912, 
of any person who can not produce a diploma 
from a college of medicine which requires 
at least five years of study. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the .American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

LS. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 6.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



UNION 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cat., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 165 Cordova St., West. P. O. 
Box 1365. 

T.VCOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SE.\TTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 66. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Qulncy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore.. 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

El'REKA, Cal., 227 First St.. P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

IIONOLULTT, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V4 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND. Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 574. 



1 

J 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building. P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORI.\, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

L.\ CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
S.\N FRANCISCO, Cil., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore , P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can lif 111'" nil. 1 I'V sp.inion .Tt 
any of the aliove-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OP AUSTRALASI/ 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



women, is one of the serious grievances. At 
a meeting held during the week at Manches- 
ter, there was for the first time in the history 
of the postal service a gathering of inspectors 
as well as telegraphists, postmen, and sub- 
postmasters. They, one and all, agreed that 
there was sweating in the postal service, and 
that the treatment meted out to them was caus- 
ing unrest and discontent. Wages in the 
postal service have practically been at a stand- 
still for the past twenty years, despite the in- 
creased cost of living, whilst the work of the 
postal employes has greatly increased. It 
was decided to again call on the Postmaster- 
General to appoint a committee of inquiry." 



The McNamara Trial. 

All eyes are now turned to Los Angeles, 
where one of the greatest trials of the century 
is going on. The National Manufacturers' As- 
sociation and its auxiliaries are attempting to 
fasten a crime on organized labor and will 
spend millions of dollars to accomplish that 
end. Organized labor, strong in its sense of 
innocence, is giving battle to the organized 
employers, and their attorneys say they will 
present a defense so strong that its enemies 
will be confounded. 

The following facts and figures give an ap- 
proximate idea of the magnitude of the Mc- 
Namara trial : 

Number of witnesses to be called by the 
prosecution, 425. 

Number of witnesses who will probably be 
called for the defense, 135. 

Number of lawyers who will appear in the 
courtroom for the defense and prosecution, 
10. 

Number of lawyers associated with the de- 
fense and the prosecution who will not ap- 
pear in the courtroom, 40. 

Number of detectives employed, 600. 

Length of time estimated for the first trial. 
180 days. 

Estimated number of words which will be 
contained in official transcript of the case, 7,- 
200,000. 

Approximate expense to the defense and the 
prosecution, $2,000,000. 

Number of States where witnesses will be 
secured, 15. 

Number of correspondents who will report 
the trial, 64. 

Number of spectators wlio may secure daily 
entrance to the courtroom, 74. 



British Miners Favor Strike. 

Unless some arrangements can be made be- 
tween the colliery proprietors of England and 
the miners in regard to a minimum wage, there 
may be a national strike of miners. The trou- 
ble has been brewing for many months, espe- 
cially in regard to the rate of pay for working 
in abnormal places. A large number of miners 
have had sectional strikes over the question 
of work and wages, and now the Lancashire 
and Cheshire miners are up in arms regarding 
a demand for an increase in wages for the day 
wagemen and the boys employed in the pits. 
The coal owners have agreed to meet the 
men's representatives, and if no settlement is 
reached, 100,000 miners will strike. The 
miners in many districts are also demanding 
the abolition of piece work. The coal owners 
have already expressed their opinion that they 
are afraid that men working in abnormal pla- 
ces may not work fairly, and may be guilty of 
malingering, hence their decision not to give 
way on the question of a minimum wage. It 



is to be hoped, however, that some solution 
of the difficulty will be found, or there is bound 
to be a national strike of miners in the near 
future. 



Those Spreading Rails. 

The railroads continue to cripple and maim 
the people; cars continue to jump the tracks 
and again the same reason is given, "spread- 
ing rails." Two trainmen were seriously in- 
jured and several hundred passengers badly 
shaken up when train No. 9 running toward 
New York over the Lackawanna Railroad was 
derailed near Delaware Water Gap. Spread- 
ing rails caused the accident. If railroad com- 
panies emplo3'ed a sufficient number of main- 
tenance of way employes, paid them living 
wages and established a schedule of working 
hours that would give them sufficient time to 
rest and recuperate there would be few acci- 
dents on account of spreading rails. The 
maintenance of way employes on the Lacka- 
wanna Railroad were compelled to strike re- 
cently on account of intolerable conditions of 
labor, and now the traveling ptiblic is sufifer- 
ing- as a result. 



Some Judges Are Corrupt. 

The late Senator George F. Hoar, of Mas- 
sachusetts, did not believe that all judges were 
incorruptible. While a member of the House 
of Representatives in 1876 he said : "My own 
public life has been a very brief and insignifi- 
cant one, extending very little beyond the 
duration of a single term of Senatorial office. 
But in that brief period I have seen five 
judges of a high court of the United States 
driven from office by threats of impeachment 
for corruption or maladministration. I have 
seen in the State of the Union foremost in 
power and wealth four judges of her courts 
impeached for corruption." 



Becky Fisher, True Blue. 

All movements for the uplift have had 
their heroes, heroines and martyrs, and the 
labor movement is no exception to the rule. 
The strike that is now going on in Cleveland 
has developed many noble characters, among 
them Becky Fisher, a frail young girl, 17 
years old, who has displayed great courage 
and instilled confidence into her fellow- 
strikers. And she is only one of several 
hundreds of girls who are gallantly holding 
the fort of unionism and repulsing every 
attack of unscrupulous employers who are 
daily attempting to scale the breastworks of 
organized labor. A better fight has never 
been witnessed. The girls are exhibiting a 
spirit of self-sacrifice that stirs the hearts of 
all lionest men and women. 

For fifteen weeks 600C) members of the 
International Ladies' Garment Workers' 
Union have been on strike in Cleveland, O. 
Two thousand of the strikers are women 
and girls, and no advance movement has liad 
braver or more self-sacrificing exponents 
than tiie girl strikers, who are now fighting 
for the very life of their union in the home 
city of Jolin 1). Rockefeller. 

Hounded by the private detectives and 
sluggers of the avaricious employers, driven 
from the streets and arrested by the city 
police, the women have maintained the 
picket line, and with undaunted spirit con- 
tinue the fight for living wages, reasonable 
hours of labor and industrial freedom. Even 
the specter of the jail with all its attendant 
horrors for frail women has not kept them 
from responding to the call of duty, and 
scores of them are arrested daily for at- 



tempting to exercise the riglit of American 
citizens. 

Humiliating and mortifying trips in the 
patrol, ainise at the hands of bullies, private 
detectives and city police, and even confine- 
ment in vile cages in station houses have all 
failed to break the spirit of the strikers, and 
the ])attle is l)cing waged with undiminished 
vigor and marvelous courage. There can 
only be one ending for such a conflict and 
that a complete victory for the strikers. 

Becky Fisher has been arrested thirty-nine 
times in eleven weeks and driven in the 
patrol to the station house because she re- 
fused to surrender her right to talk to her 
fellow-workers and try to persuade them not 
to take the places of the strikers and help 
unscrupulous employers to defeat honest 
toilers. She has been insulted and abused 
Ijy those who should have been her pro- 
tectors. Becky has never flinched. Re- 
leased from durance vile, she has always 
hastened back to the scene of the fray to 
succor and cheer her fellow-unionists. 

She has a horror of the police, the patrol 
wagon and the jail, but her union is as 
sacred to her as was Old Glory to Barbara 
Freitchie, and fear is an unknown quality 
to this little girl when she is fighting for her 
loved union and the cause it represents. 

Becky is now on the road pleading for 
funds to enable her brothers and sisters to 
continue the struggle against the Cleveland 
labor crushers. Her appeal is from the 
heart and should meet a ready response from 
all union men and women. 

The strikers want a 50-hour instead of a 
75-hour week, the abolition of the sub-con- 
tract system, and the charge of 25 cents a day 
for the use of the machines and many other 
very ol)n(>xious conditions. 



Doing Things in Erie. 

Reports from Erie, Pa., show that the 
unions are up and doing and that very en- 
couraging results are being attained. Mem- 
bers of the various unions have been con- 
ducting a campaign for higher wages and 
have been remarkably successful. The 
Painters, Carpenters, Fish Dressers and the 
Stone Masons' Unions have secured sub- 
stantial increases in wages for their mem- 
bers, and other unions are about to make 
similar demands with assurances of success. 

\Miile the old unions have been making 
gains in membership and wages, the non- 
union workmen, realizing the necessity for 
concerted action, have been getting into line, 
and as a consequence new unions of sheet- 
metal workers, chaufi^eurs, bookbinders and 
street-carmen have been formed. Men of 
other crafts and callings are seeking to profit 
through organization, and the union men of 
the city arc rendering them every assistance 
in their effort to l)ecome a part of the laI)or 
movement. 



Industrial Council Established. 

l'"or tile settling of industrial disputes the 
I'ritish Government has establisiied an indus- 
trial council, consisting of leading representa- 
tives of employers and the working men, un- 
der the chairmanship of Sir George Ranken 
Askwith, of the Board of Trade. 

According to the original plan of Sydney 
Ikixton, President of the Board of Trade, the 
council was to be composed of ten leading em- 
ployers and ten prominent labor representa- 
tives. 



Demand the union label on all products! 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Domestic and Naval. 



The revenue-cutter Seneca has de- 
stroyed the lunihcr-laden derelict re- 
ported October 5 in latitude 41.56, 
longitude 66.23. 

The new thrce-ma.sted schooner Ed- 
ward R. Smith was launched October 
10 at Phippsburg. Me. She sailed on 
the 11th for Palatka. Fla. 

The ship Edward Scwall, from 
Philadelphia for San Francisco, was 
spoken on October 8 in latitude 39.19 
north, longitude 70.12 west. 

The Southern Steamship Company'.^^ 
steamer .Mgiers. reported ashore at 
Marcus Hook bai", was floated on Oc- 
tober 12 and proceeded to her dock 
at Philadelphia. 

President Taft. in a speech at San 
Francisco on October 14, declared 
himself in favor of granting free pas- 
sage to .■\merican ships through the 
Panama Canal. 

The schooner .\nnie E. Russell, of 
Camden, X. J., stranded on Cold 
Spring bar on October 11. She was 
floated on the 12th and towed to Se- 
well Point in a leaking condition. 

It has been learned that the British 
bark which sank with all on board on 
September 30 at the entrance to the 
Bay of Fundy. was the .\beona, reg- 
istered at Bridgetown. Barbadoes. 

Mrs. William G. Hulett, master and 
pilot of the steamer Mary, belonging 
to her husband, is the only woman 
steamboat master in the Alton sec- 
tion of the Mississippi Valley. 

The .American Cup defender Co- 
lumbia which won from Sir Thomas 
Eipton's Shamrock, will be fitted out 
as a pleasure boat at Baltimore. Her 
owner is Charles Tucker, of that city. 

The North German I-loyd liner 
Chemnitz has been substituted for the 
Hanover in that line's Philadelphia- 
Bremen service. The Chemnitz will 
sail from Philadelphia in November. 

-After serving eighteen years on a 
lightship on Diamond Shoals, off Cape 
Charles, and as master of the light- 
ship No. 46. in the Chesapeake Bay, 
Captain J. E Bowling, of Baltimore, 
has resigned. 

The ship William P. Frye, from 
Honolulu for Delaware Breakwater, 
was spoken on October 10 in latitude 
32.19 north, longitude 74.44 west, by 
the steamer .Mba. The vessel left 
Honolulu on May 22. 

A message was received at St. Eouis 
on October 19, telling of the sinking 
of the United States light tender Eily 
in the Missouri River, near Camden, 
Mo. It is assumed that no lives were 
lost. The boat was in charge of Cap- 
tain W. C. I'.agon and had a crew of 
twenty men. 

George von L. Meyer. Secretary of 
the Navy, on October 17 gave out the 
first official statement bearing on the 
cause of the Maine disaster which has 
been made by the Navy Department 
since the work of moving the wreck- 
age began. His statement confirms 
the theory of external explosion. 

The afiRliated Norwegian and Swed- 
ish-Mexican steamship lines have ar- 
ranged to extend their services to 
North .Xtlantic ports, including Phila- 
delphia and New York. The vessels 
of these lines will be principally cargo 
carriers, but some provision is to be 
made for passengers. 

The Cunard Steamship Company is 
defendant in two suits at Boston in 
which the plaintiffs claim that the cor- 
poration broke an agreement to trans- 
port them to Sydney. .Australia. The 
])IaintifFs were landed at Eivcrpool 
and they aver that there were no ac- 
commodations on the next boat out for 
their port of destination. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

When in port come up and give us a trial. 
The newest 25-cent house in town. 
New building, new furniture. 
Special attention to mariners. 



FREE BATHS 



Special Weekly 
Rates 



J. H. KLINE, Prop. 



Residenc-; Phone Ind. Green 185 



School Phone Ind. A 4484 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
204 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



The Northwest 
Navigation School 

Applicants prepared for Master's, 
Mate's and Pilot's License of all 
grades. Ocean, coast and inland 
waters. Terms reasonable. 

CAPT. E. SNELLENBERG, 

Graduate New York Nautical Col- 
lege; licensed master of ocean steam 
and sail vessels (unlimited); pilot of 
various inland waters; adjuster of 
compasses. 333 Globe Bldg., First 
Ave. and Madison St., Seattle, Wash. 




THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all Its 
Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation In a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor In Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave. SEATTLE. Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SE.\TTLE, WASH. 

Seattle, Wash., Letter LUt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
PosiofHce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vernon W. Buck .Arthur C. .McLane 

Carl G. Ben.son 

BUCK, BENSON & McLANE, 

Lawyers and Praetors in Admiraity. 

I'rcc Advice to Seamen. 

764-5-6 Empire Building, 
Seattle, Wash. 

V'i t.-iia og r-krilva de nordiska spra;ig. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Andersen, K. E. 
Andersen, J. G. 

-1534 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Hoe, E. L. 
Carlson, Jacob 
Carlson, C. E. 
Dahlgren, A. 
Derdlo, F. 
Dennett, J. 
Uell, Herman 
Elwood, J. 
Ellison, Chas. 
Ellifson, otto 
Elsted, J. 
Erikson, A. -1732 
Erikson. O. -606 
Erikson, Fridbjof 
Erikson, Aug. 
Eugene, J. 
Fager, J. 
Farnan, W. L. 
Fellix, P. 
Felix, L. 
Feeley, T. 
Fjelstad, K. M. 
Franzell, A. 
Garbers. G. 
Hansen, C. J. -967 
Hansen, C. -1476 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Haak. C. 
Haga, A. A. 
Hansen, Harald 
Herman, Axel 
Ilenrikson, H. 
Ilolmstrom. C 
Holm. H. P. 
Ivorson. Iver 
Ingebretsen, Olaf 
Jacklin, C. 



-1773 

A. 



Jacobson. John 
Jensen, H. -1141 
Jensen, John 
Jensen, H. -2014 
Johansen, Ludvig 
Johanson, Olaf K. 
Johanson, Aug. W. 

-313 
Johanson. O. W. 

-139 
Johnson, John N. 
Johnson, Alf. -1700 
Johnson, Alex. 
Kalning, Jacob 
Karell. J. H. 
Kenny, J. 
Kittelson. C. T. 
Kiesow, P. 
Klrst, H. 
Knappe, Adolf 
Koptze, C. 
Kerwin, W. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kreutz, Karl 
Kroon, Z. 
Larsen. Alfred 
Lathi, J. H. 
Larsen, C. H. 
Lorln, K. 
Lundquist. John 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, O. P. 
Olsen, Bvor 
Olsen, J. H. 
Olsen. Oscar 
Olssen, Frank 
Olsen, Erik 
Ommundsen. T. 
Osterberg, Gust. 
Paul, P. G. 
Peterson, Axel -1223 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 

My Work Is My Best Advertisement 

W. H. MIDDLETON 

TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, Cutter 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In Every 

Garment 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three doors south of James, SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13 



Peterson. C. V. -644 
Petterson, O. -710 
Peterson, E. -668 
Reime, T. 
lieinink, H. 
RpinlioUi, A. 
liiuinak, H. 
Scftveit, J. 
Saar, J. 
Saniiiel-sen, A. R. 

-732 
Scott, Alf. 
Scarabosio, M. 
Schultz, Wm. 



Schafer, I'. 
Satto, S. 
Stor, W. T. 
Suomlnen, Alex. 
Swenson, L. G. 
Swanson, Gu."; 
Slor, W. 
Ttiocke, E . 
Tollffsen, Andrew 
Tergersen, Kasper 
Turner, T. 
Wilde, H. 
Zechel, W. 
Zwahlen, R. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

Brewed by 
HUMBOLDT BREWING CO, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLfF KARLSE.V, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street - - Eureka, Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Bror Utter, a native of Bornhus, 
Gefle, Sweden, last heard from in 
New York, in 1905, is inquired for by 
his parents. Address, Maskinisten 
Utter, Bornhus, Sweden. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

The United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at Philadelphia, Pa., re- 
quests the following named seamen to 
communicate with him: 

Gust Leyrle, arrived at Philadelphia, 
October 2, 1908, on ship Dirigo. 

Gnstav Mattson and Victor Wilson, 
on schooner Charles Davenport. 
March. 1911. 

Jf)hn McCaulcy. whose brother 
Cyrus McCauley (late of barge Har- 
risburgh) died in Marine Hospital. 
Philadelphia, on May 17, 1911. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes 
Groceries and Notions 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty 

You Know the Place 
320 S. F. St., near Sailors' Union Hall 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen 

Trade with JUKKA SAHLSTEIN. 

New store. Everything is new and sold 
at right prices. 304 South F St., near 
Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen, Wash. 



SMOKE 
THE RED SEAL CIGAR 

GRAND CIGAR STORE 

300 S. F. St., in front of Sailors' 

Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
6tand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEGE- 
TABLES. Shipping supplied at lowest 
rates. Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. 

Port 



Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Waterman ^ Katz 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Complete stock of Ship Candlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, Etc., Etc. Honest 
and fair dealing la our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 
Union Label Goods 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



JS[Pll880, 

Issued by AuWoriiyof uie Cigar MaKers' InternaUonal UnlonorAmenca 

Union-made Cigars 

Uhi$ Sfdifif^. TlatUaatincaitamlliiUiliVnhmbeRinaMliyariCtQESWirln 

i HlHicn OF TH[ OCM Itucn 'ihtuutiohu union </ AM.ica. u oruninboi devoled h> It* id- 
»jnc!mtiitor*c«ORAlHiTDlWjndlNIElUailAIWtirAR£OfTHtOWT. n»n<ort M racoaaeod 

AiJ Mii/)q«iatiiu «pon Uus Lahci «iJ b« punched icortfn^ toUM. 



F«C 

' smiLC 






■/■fa wy i 'm 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H.T^MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats. Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts. 
Quilts, Blankets and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 
Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall 2320 N. 30th Street, Old Town 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WorKingmen's Store 

Importer and Dealer in 
Fine Custom and Ready-Made Clothing 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots. Shoes, Rubber and Oil Clothing, 
Trunks, Valises, Etc. 

ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

23 N. Third Street Near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

Wanted 

By the United States Bureau of Labor, 
Washington, D. C, the following num- 
bers of the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Volumes 1 to 4 
Volume 5, Nos. 2, 20, 22, 27, 30 
Volume 6, Nos. 14, 17, 20, 31, 
45, 46, 48 

Anyone having any of the numbers 
indicated above will please communi- 
cate with the United States Bureau of 
Labor, Washington, D. C. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 



MATES, AHOY! 



GO TO THE 



Union Cigar Store 

For Your CIGARS, TOBACCO 
and SMOKING SUPPLIES, also 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

RAYMOND, - - WASH. 

MARINE COOKS' LETTER LIST 
Seattle, Wash. 



Areas, Chas. 
Barbo, M. 
Barnett, H. 
Bergstrom, F. 
Bradley, A. J. 
Bushby, Mr. 
Bonnell, H. 
Brown, F. C. 
BrpwDlee, Tom 
Connolly, Tom 
Chivers, L. 
Engstrom, Swan 
Flores, Augstlne 
Grace, Richard 
Giradelli, A. 
Hanlon, Jack 
Hedger, A. 
Laugan, Jas. 
Law, Willie 
Lawson, John 



Morris, Ernest 
Morgan, H. E. 
Morgan, L. 
Morris, John 
Moyes, Andrew 
Murphy, E. M. 
McCall, Wm. 
O'Farrell, Jas. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Parrott, I. 
Pierce, Claude 
Stacey, Frank 
Stollery, Joe 
Stevens, Jas. 
Stevenson, J. 
Tllibury, H. 
Tinoco, Joe 
Taylor, W. 
Vanhear, Jas. 
Van Ermen, H. 



INFORMATION WANTED, 



The Danish Consulate, 815 Mills 
Building, San Francisco, wants for 
the relatives in question, information 
regarding: 

Carl Jensen, born March 13, 1877, 
in Troelstrup, near Haslev, Denmark. 
Mr. Jensen has been a member, of the 
Sailors' Union and was in 1907 on 
board the schooner Henry Nelson. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton stieet, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Carl Sofus Frandzen, born in Co- 
penhagen, February 11, 1881. Left 
Denmark in 1901; employed in United 
States Navy, 1902. His father wants 
to get into communication. 

Jesper Christian Jespersen, who has 
been a member of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific up to 1900. Has been 
employed on various life-saving sta- 
tions on the Pacific Coast and later 
on sailed a scow on the San Fran- 
cisco Bay. His brother in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

George Ulrich Rune, whose ad- 
dress in 1909 was care of Sailors' 
Union Hall, Tacoma, Wash. His 
father in Denmark wants to get in 
communication with him. 

William Ernst Ludvig Hansen, 
called W. E. Hansen, a native of Co- 
penhagen, Denmark. Mr. Hansen was 
in 1907 in the employ of the Alaska 
Packers' Association at Karluk, Alas- 
ka. Since then nothing has been 
heard of him. His sister in Copen- 
hagen wants to get in communication 
with him. 

Jens Peder Lauritz Pedersen, ma- 
rine engineer and fireman, born in 
Dalby, near Thureby, Denmark, April 
14, 1878, and supposed to have ar- 
rived in San Francisco in the winter 
of 1907-8, is inquired for by the Da- 
nish Consulate, BIS Mills Bldg., San 
Francisco. Cal 



News from Abroad. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



English suffragettes i)lan the organ- 
ization of a military force of women 
to dcfciul the country. 

Italy's fourth Dreadnought, the 
Giiilio Cozare, was launclu-d from the 
.Anzaldi Navy 'S'anl at Genoa on Oc- 
tober 15. 

Tlie legend that Leo Tolstoy is still 
;ilivc flourishes in Tolstoy's i)rovince, 
Tula, also in Kazan, Kurski and sev- 
eral other governments. 

Italy announces tliat no proposals 
of intervention will be entertained 
until the whole iirovince of Tripoli 
has been occupied by its troops. 

The Interparliamentary Union for 
.\rbitration may refuse to meet in 
Rome, as planned, because of Italy's 
action in waging war on Turkey. 

With a view to mitigating condi- 
tions resulting from the extraordinary 
rise in food prices the city of Berlin 
has gone into business as a wholesale 
food merchant. 

.\n expedition has set out from Ox- 
ford University with its objective a 
cannibal isle in the South Seas, where 
it expects to spend a year in studying 
the habits of the natives. 

The Prefect of the Seine has de- 
cided to levy a heavy tax on illumi- 
nated signs in Paris, representative 
architects and artists having protested 
against them. 

It is highly probable that Mnie. 
Curie, the famous chemist, will be 
elected to fill the vacancy in the 
French .Academy of Sciences eaused 
by the death of Louis Troost. 

The three days' battle between the 
Chinese Government forces from the 
north and the revolutionists, which 
has been raging at Hankow, has end- 
ed in a complete victory for the lat- 
ter. 

It is reported from Shanghai 
that the Chinese rebels have pro- 
claimed a republic at Wu Chang and 
that the leaders at Hankow have noti- 
fied the foreign consuls that a new 
government has been formed. 

The racing schooner Nordstern. 
which sailed from Gibraltar on Sep- 
tember 26 for Kiel, with a crew of 
twenty-four men, is missing. The 
Nordstern was formerly Emperor 
William's Meteor III. She was built 
in .America. 

The London Times confirms the 
statement that Turkey has agreed to 
allow free passage of the Dardanelles 
to neutral vessels carrying grain. It 
is believed that between 200 and 300 
such vessels arc now waiting in the 
Black Sea. 

The Nationalist press in Cairo is 
again raising a cry against the .\nier- 
ican Mission in Egyi)t, and is cilling 
upon the Government to repress by 
force the Christianizing of Moslem 
lads, on the ground that I'"gypt is a 
Mohannnedan count rj-, 

lender the leadership of Captain 
I'arker. an archaeological expedition 
has left London for Jerusalem to con- 
tinue the work of the last two years 
iin the site of the ancient Zion with 
the view of discovering the burial 
places of David and Solomon. 

Great Britain's largest and best ar- 
mored battleship. King George V, was 
launched at Portsmouth on October 
9. The George V has a displacement 
of 23,000 tons and her armament con- 
sits of ten 13.5-inch guns and twenty- 
four four-inch guns. Engines of 31,- 
000 horse-power arc expected to fur- 
nish a sjjced of twenty-one knots an 
lu)ur. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Eugene Ely. a well-known aviator, 
was killed by the collapse of his ma- 
chine at Macon, Ga., on October 19. 

The output of the Iditarod (Alaska) 
gold camp during the season just 
closing will total close to $3,500,000. 

Many women have registered in 
California, following the adoption on 
October 10 of the Constitutional 
amendment for Woman Suffrage. 

Officials of the Harriman lines re- 
port that the passenger business ob- 
tained during the colonist rate period, 
which ended on October 15, will ex- 
ceed the record made a year ago. 

Nathaniel Pitt Langford, a pioneer 
resident, who was one of the discov- 
erers of the Yellowstone Park, and its 
first superintendent, died at St. Paul, 
Minn., on October IS aged 79 years. 

Governor Wilson, of New Jersey, 
speaking in Morristown recently, de- 
clared the cause of business unrest 
is a feeling that things are being done 
secretly which could not be done in 
the open. 

The gross earnings of the Pullman 
Company from the operation of its 
cars in the fiscal year ending July 31 
increased about $1,000,000 over those 
of the preceding year to a total of 
$36,389,000. 

Law officers of Virginia, North 
Carolina and South Carolina have 
objected to the proposed plan for dis- 
solution of the Tobacco Trust, upon 
the ground that the plan offers no re- 
lief to tobacco growers. 

The United States Court of Com- 
merce has denied an application for 
an injunction to the Lehigh Valley 
Railroad against an order of the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission re- 
ducing rates on coal to tidewater. 

The southwestern Alaska coast was 
visited by another severe earthquake 
on October 17. Cordova cables say 
the shock lasted several seconds. The 
coast glaciers were shaken up and 
sluicing mining operations stopped. 

The total population of Canada is 
given as 7,081,8